planning to take Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course. help?

maniac0788
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 2:46 pm

planning to take Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course. help?

Postby maniac0788 » Tue Sep 14, 2010 2:34 pm

Hello Everyone,

I plan on taking Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course Manhattan. What do you guys think about that course? Is it any good? When do you guy's think I should take this course, right before taking the lsat or a long time prior to the test so that I can get the feel of the test and study on my own before taking the lsat? I plan on taking the lsat either in December 2010 or February 2010 depending on when I feel I am ready. I am not that familiar with the lsat. I started to study using Powerscore's logic games bible but than took a 4 month break due to vacation. Now I am back from vacation and ready to start again.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated
Thanks in advance

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LSAT Blog
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Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 9:24 pm

Re: planning to take Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course. help?

Postby LSAT Blog » Tue Sep 14, 2010 2:41 pm

Sometimes people fall behind with the homework during a prep course.

For this reason, and the fact that sometimes people need more time to let things digest, I'm of the opinion that it's better to give yourself plenty of time after the course to review things more thoroughly on your own before taking the exam itself.

However, this is dependent upon the idea that you'll be motivated/have time to study more after the course ends. If you're motivated and have the time, it's very worthwhile to give yourself more time afterward, but it really depends on you/your personality/your schedule and other obligations.

maniac0788
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 2:46 pm

Re: planning to take Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course. help?

Postby maniac0788 » Tue Sep 14, 2010 2:46 pm

Thank You very much for your response. I just completed college and have plenty of free time to study.

LSAT Blog wrote:Sometimes people fall behind with the homework during a prep course.

For this reason, and the fact that sometimes people need more time to let things digest, I'm of the opinion that it's better to give yourself plenty of time after the course to review things more thoroughly on your own before taking the exam itself.

However, this is dependent upon the idea that you'll be motivated/have time to study more after the course ends. If you're motivated and have the time, it's very worthwhile to give yourself more time afterward, but it really depends on you/your personality/your schedule and other obligations.

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Jeffort
Posts: 1896
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: planning to take Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course. help?

Postby Jeffort » Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:29 pm

maniac0788 wrote:Thank You very much for your response. I just completed college and have plenty of free time to study.

LSAT Blog wrote:Sometimes people fall behind with the homework during a prep course.

For this reason, and the fact that sometimes people need more time to let things digest, I'm of the opinion that it's better to give yourself plenty of time after the course to review things more thoroughly on your own before taking the exam itself.

However, this is dependent upon the idea that you'll be motivated/have time to study more after the course ends. If you're motivated and have the time, it's very worthwhile to give yourself more time afterward, but it really depends on you/your personality/your schedule and other obligations.


Since you mentioned taking either the December or February LSAT is it safe to assume that you are not planning on applying this cycle for fall 2011 LS admission?

If that is the case, you have plenty of time to master the test as best as you can. Powerscore classes and books/materials are solid. With their full length class, in addition to the classroom hours you get 100's of pages of helpful stuff and a bunch of online resources that go far beyond just a set of all the available LSAT questions.

In general I recommend that it is better to take a class that ends at least a week or more (several weeks is better) before your scheduled test date so that you have time to digest, practice, review and get everything to percolate in your brain and solidify in a way that makes it second nature that will work under the pressure of test day.

Good full length courses throw a lot of information, concepts, strategies, techniques, etc. at you in a relatively condensed amount of time, meaning that to really assimilate all of it you will need to spend a lot of time outside of class going over all it and most people need more time after the class is over to really make sure they 'get it' with everything so it all sticks.

However, LSAT Blog makes important points. If you are not the type that can self-motivate yourself to study on your own and follow a study schedule without having a class schedule to force you to do it, then you may be better off taking a class that ends shortly before your test date to prevent you from getting lazy in the weeks between the end of the class and the test.

maniac0788
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 2:46 pm

Re: planning to take Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course. help?

Postby maniac0788 » Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:37 pm

Thanks for your reply. I understand what you are saying. I would like to apply for a LS admission as soon as possible. But I don't want to have a low score on the Lsat. I am pretty much a beginner at this point. If I take the feb 2011 lsat when is the earliest time I can apply for a LS admission?

Jeffort wrote:
maniac0788 wrote:Thank You very much for your response. I just completed college and have plenty of free time to study.

LSAT Blog wrote:Sometimes people fall behind with the homework during a prep course.

For this reason, and the fact that sometimes people need more time to let things digest, I'm of the opinion that it's better to give yourself plenty of time after the course to review things more thoroughly on your own before taking the exam itself.

However, this is dependent upon the idea that you'll be motivated/have time to study more after the course ends. If you're motivated and have the time, it's very worthwhile to give yourself more time afterward, but it really depends on you/your personality/your schedule and other obligations.


Since you mentioned taking either the December or February LSAT is it safe to assume that you are not planning on applying this cycle for fall 2011 LS admission?

If that is the case, you have plenty of time to master the test as best as you can. Powerscore classes and books/materials are solid. With their full length class, in addition to the classroom hours you get 100's of pages of helpful stuff and a bunch of online resources that go far beyond just a set of all the available LSAT questions.

In general I recommend that it is better to take a class that ends at least a week or more (several weeks is better) before your scheduled test date so that you have time to digest, practice, review and get everything to percolate in your brain and solidify in a way that makes it second nature that will work under the pressure of test day.

Good full length courses throw a lot of information, concepts, strategies, techniques, etc. at you in a relatively condensed amount of time, meaning that to really assimilate all of it you will need to spend a lot of time outside of class going over all it and most people need more time after the class is over to really make sure they 'get it' with everything so it all sticks.

However, LSAT Blog makes important points. If you are not the type that can self-motivate yourself to study on your own and follow a study schedule without having a class schedule to force you to do it, then you may be better off taking a class that ends shortly before your test date to prevent you from getting lazy in the weeks between the end of the class and the test.

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Jeffort
Posts: 1896
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: planning to take Powerscore's LSAT Full Length Course. help?

Postby Jeffort » Tue Sep 14, 2010 4:08 pm

Ok, you are just at the beginning stages of trying to seek admission to Law School. You have a lot of research ahead of you to do.

I wouldn't plan on applying for fall 2011 admission given how everything works with rolling admissions and the deadlines for applying this cycle. February scores are not reported in time to be considered by most LS's for admission that same calendar year due to how the cycle works with deadlines and rolling admissions and all that.

Based on your situation I think that you would be much better off aiming to apply next cycle for fall of 2012 admission. You have an enormous amount of time consuming work ahead of you to be able to be a solid candidate at a quality LS.

Just prepping for the LSAT and getting your score into a good range for your favored schools (desired score range depending on your UG GPA and what LS's you are aiming for) can and should take at least 2-3 months, possibly more depending on where you start and how fast you are able to improve. Aside from the LSAT itself there is a lot of important time consuming work to be done researching potential schools, putting together your application materials, etc.


maniac0788 wrote:Thanks for your reply. I understand what you are saying. I would like to apply for a LS admission as soon as possible. But I don't want to have a low score on the Lsat. I am pretty much a beginner at this point. If I take the feb 2011 lsat when is the earliest time I can apply for a LS admission?

Jeffort wrote:
maniac0788 wrote:Thank You very much for your response. I just completed college and have plenty of free time to study.

LSAT Blog wrote:Sometimes people fall behind with the homework during a prep course.

For this reason, and the fact that sometimes people need more time to let things digest, I'm of the opinion that it's better to give yourself plenty of time after the course to review things more thoroughly on your own before taking the exam itself.

However, this is dependent upon the idea that you'll be motivated/have time to study more after the course ends. If you're motivated and have the time, it's very worthwhile to give yourself more time afterward, but it really depends on you/your personality/your schedule and other obligations.


Since you mentioned taking either the December or February LSAT is it safe to assume that you are not planning on applying this cycle for fall 2011 LS admission?

If that is the case, you have plenty of time to master the test as best as you can. Powerscore classes and books/materials are solid. With their full length class, in addition to the classroom hours you get 100's of pages of helpful stuff and a bunch of online resources that go far beyond just a set of all the available LSAT questions.

In general I recommend that it is better to take a class that ends at least a week or more (several weeks is better) before your scheduled test date so that you have time to digest, practice, review and get everything to percolate in your brain and solidify in a way that makes it second nature that will work under the pressure of test day.

Good full length courses throw a lot of information, concepts, strategies, techniques, etc. at you in a relatively condensed amount of time, meaning that to really assimilate all of it you will need to spend a lot of time outside of class going over all it and most people need more time after the class is over to really make sure they 'get it' with everything so it all sticks.

However, LSAT Blog makes important points. If you are not the type that can self-motivate yourself to study on your own and follow a study schedule without having a class schedule to force you to do it, then you may be better off taking a class that ends shortly before your test date to prevent you from getting lazy in the weeks between the end of the class and the test.




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