For those who have taught/tutored

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Indebted
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For those who have taught/tutored

Postby Indebted » Mon Jun 28, 2010 11:55 pm

What companies are the best to work for? Compensation is paramount, but total hours available, flexibility, training, and methods are also relevant. Do any companies have nice perks?

For those that tutor privately, any advice for getting started and building a business? Do you force your students into a particular schedule or just help with what they think they need? Does it vary client to client? I would think flexibility of instruction is one of the great advantages of hiring a private tutor.

Thanks for your insight!

r6_philly
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby r6_philly » Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:17 am

I am doing it on my own, I guess by word of mouth. I can't imagine any tutoring company will pay me anywhere near what I get... If you can do it on your own, do it on your own.

Audio Technica Guy
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby Audio Technica Guy » Tue Jun 29, 2010 6:19 pm

totally depends on what you're after. It's borderline impossible to make a great living as an on your own tutor. Advertising yourself adequately is difficult. If you succeed at all, you'll likely be given a cease and desist order from some company that thinks you're stealing their methods, or LSAC for stealing their questions, etc.

If you're just after a few dollars here and there for a part time gig, teaching on your own is a good bet.

Teaching for companies is your best bet if you want a steady income from it, as they'll be able to give you steady work, pay you for training, give you advancement opportunities if you're good, etc.

r6_philly
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby r6_philly » Wed Jun 30, 2010 1:27 am

I hope people who are capable enough to tutor can find gainful employment doing what they went to college for, which should be better than a job as a tutor. You can make average college grad salary if you private tutor 8 hours a week if you ask enough (and get it). But I find when you only charge someone 1 or 2 hours a week it is a lot easier to keep a steady, long-term client, and they benefit more too.

But I guess I am in a different boat since my day job has much better prospects than tutoring companies can offer.

Audio Technica Guy
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby Audio Technica Guy » Wed Jun 30, 2010 8:35 am

r6_philly wrote:I hope people who are capable enough to tutor can find gainful employment doing what they went to college for, which should be better than a job as a tutor. You can make average college grad salary if you private tutor 8 hours a week if you ask enough (and get it). But I find when you only charge someone 1 or 2 hours a week it is a lot easier to keep a steady, long-term client, and they benefit more too.

But I guess I am in a different boat since my day job has much better prospects than tutoring companies can offer.


Not sure what you're saying here. How do you have a "steady long term client" in test prep? Doesn't that mean you've failed?

I know people who make upper five figures with full benefits at test prep companies. Certainly not the norm, but if you're actually motivated, it's definitely feasible, as most people in test prep are notorious slackers.

r6_philly
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby r6_philly » Wed Jun 30, 2010 1:31 pm

Audio Technica Guy wrote:Not sure what you're saying here. How do you have a "steady long term client" in test prep? Doesn't that mean you've failed?


There are 4 administrations each year, to go through it slowly instead of cramming, you can tutor someone for about 3 month/12-15 weeks. Help with app prep and consulting too. Those are long term and you can certainly end up with a decent full schedule. So I guess I meant "steady clientele base".

I know people who make upper five figures with full benefits at test prep companies. Certainly not the norm, but if you're actually motivated, it's definitely feasible, as most people in test prep are notorious slackers.


upper 5's is not a lot of money. Fulltime that's 30-40 an hour doing customer service intensive work? You can charge twice as much tutoring and be more flexible in everything. Plus keeping a full-time job, or go to school, which I am doing both.

The downsides are valid, but if you can get it going by yourself it is much better. The only people that ever comes to my UG is Kaplan and they hire 90 percentile, it isn't hard to find disatisfied customers and do better. My tutoring gig started when people told me they needed an alternative to Kaplan.

Audio Technica Guy
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby Audio Technica Guy » Wed Jun 30, 2010 1:52 pm

r6_philly wrote:
Audio Technica Guy wrote:Not sure what you're saying here. How do you have a "steady long term client" in test prep? Doesn't that mean you've failed?


There are 4 administrations each year, to go through it slowly instead of cramming, you can tutor someone for about 3 month/12-15 weeks. Help with app prep and consulting too. Those are long term and you can certainly end up with a decent full schedule. So I guess I meant "steady clientele base".

I know people who make upper five figures with full benefits at test prep companies. Certainly not the norm, but if you're actually motivated, it's definitely feasible, as most people in test prep are notorious slackers.


upper 5's is not a lot of money. Fulltime that's 30-40 an hour doing customer service intensive work? You can charge twice as much tutoring and be more flexible in everything. Plus keeping a full-time job, or go to school, which I am doing both.

The downsides are valid, but if you can get it going by yourself it is much better. The only people that ever comes to my UG is Kaplan and they hire 90 percentile, it isn't hard to find disatisfied customers and do better. My tutoring gig started when people told me they needed an alternative to Kaplan.


I agree with your upsides, but at the end of the day, if you're doing a lot of it, I'd rather work for a company that deals with all the administrative stuff and never myself having to worry about getting reported to LSAC and whatever company's books I'm using to teach. And before you say that doesn't happen, I have certainly seen it happen. I've seen LSAC give out cease and desist orders to private tutors who photocopied materials. I've seen Kaplan and Powerscore give cease and desist letters out for people teaching using their methods. How it happens is there is one disgruntled student who wants their money back, you (justifiably probably) refuse and then he/she reports you.

Certainly upper 5's is not a lot of money and if you want to make into six figures you probably have to become a top dawg at your company (which is doable, but hard and takes a while). But you're probably also going to do that much if you genuinely like the job. I could probably make 20-30k more than I do now doing something else right now. I've made 80k more than I'm currently making. However, I'm pretty happy with this job. It's easy, but challenging and stimulating at the same time. People in your company and your students will basically worship you if you're good at your job (because, honestly, so few are very good at teaching LSAT). Yes, I could charge maybe 40 more per hour doing it on my own, but I can guarantee I'd have to put in a ton more hours selling the product and building business. I'd have to worry about collecting payment. I'd have to worry about coordinating logistics. All that stuff is certainly no big deal if you're just looking to make an extra 10K per year. But if you want to make a living doing it, you're pretty much going to want to work for a company.

On the flip side, do you have any idea how many people RIGHT NOW graduated from top 14 law schools and aren't making upper 5 figures right now? More than half of grads in the last few years.

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Atlas LSAT Teacher
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby Atlas LSAT Teacher » Wed Jun 30, 2010 2:19 pm

We're hungry for teachers in certain areas of the country and we pay $100/hr + $20/hr prep time. We hold fewer classes than the big guys, but our teachers are quite happy. Not many applicants are hired and the training is intense, but maybe we'd be a fit: http://www.atlaslsat.com/lsat-teachers.cfm

Good luck!

r6_philly
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Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby r6_philly » Wed Jun 30, 2010 2:23 pm

My situation is certainly unique... I can make big law money now if I chose to, but I don't like to slave and get paid for a fraction of what I generate (even at big law salaries), so I choose leisure work that allows me freedon and flexibility.

Anyhow, I don't use any outside material. Tests are bought by students from LSAC. I only provide help with understanding and improving performance. I can develop my own material if I want, I don't have the risks you speak of.

r6_philly
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Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 4:32 pm

Re: For those who have taught/tutored

Postby r6_philly » Wed Jun 30, 2010 2:24 pm

Atlas LSAT Teacher wrote:We're hungry for teachers in certain areas of the country and we pay $100/hr + $20/hr prep time. We hold fewer classes than the big guys, but our teachers are quite happy. Not many applicants are hired and the training is intense, but maybe we'd be a fit: http://www.atlaslsat.com/lsat-teachers.cfm

Good luck!


Aparently I don't qualify because I am only 98% lol I would have looked into your program.




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