A question of motivation

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Alex-Trof
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A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 12:56 am

I am fairly new to TLS forums so may have missed a threat where this have been discussed.

I am 0L doing research on law schools and came across a phrase like: "do not go to law school unless you're absolutely want to be a lawyer." It seems like an obvious point just like "do not go to Med School unless you want to be a doctor." But, can a person (me) be more motivated by financial prospects? I mean, suppose I've gotten accepted to a t10 school and do not have any really crazy desire to be a lawyer, should I just decline my offer? I am not saying that I hate law or find it boring/not interesting. I am just not the person who dreamed to be a lawyer since I was 5. I had no idea what I wanted to and tried many different things. Nothing really interests me more to be committed to for more than few hours a week as a hobby and thinks I like doing do not pay money.

Bottom line, I will probably not be crazy about doing anything that requires me to get up at 7 or 8 am and actually do anything meaningful or useful. I am, basically, lazy, but, with enough financial incentive and no other options will put up a necessary amount of work. Would it be wrong for me to go to law school? Will I be surrounded by people eager to join a workforce and dig into whatever pile of documents they will have in the office? Are there any people in law school who are doing it "for the love of money" or prestige? Lastly, do you think it will be difficult for me to get good grades or a job offer because of it?

I appreciate your feedback and please do not be judgmental. Not everyone was born to enjoy working.

ran12
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby ran12 » Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:21 am

Most people do it for the financial incentive and many have not been dreaming of being a lawyer since they were 5. Considering the debt that most law students incur, in the end, it is all about the money, whether by choice or not. Plus, law school is a professional school meaning the primary objective for people going to law school is to get good jobs and make money. There are definitely people who do it for love of law or justice but a lot of people who say things like that are just being pretentious.

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aspire2more
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby aspire2more » Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:22 am

I'm a 0L too so take my advice for what it's worth.

If you're not interested in being a lawyer, I don't recommend going to law school. I especially don't recommend going to law school and taking on $200K in student loan debt (which by the way, canNOT be discharged in bankruptcy!) if you don't want to be an attorney. That's a lot of money to pay back for someone whose real interests "do not pay money" and who can only say they don't "hate" law. Also, in this economy and with the currently oversaturated legal market, I wouldn't bank on getting a whole lot of money or prestige. You'll be lucky to get a decent job, period. Those prestigious jobs with great salaries are virtually exclusive to major firms. Your income will be offset somewhat by the massive amount of loans you may have taken out, and you will absolutely be working a lot more hours than your post indicates will be acceptable to you.

There's nothing written that says you have to want to be an attorney from childhood. I wanted to be a postal worker at age 5 and a doctor at age 16. I did not pursue either of those career paths. Through classes and internships in undergrad and then really falling into the first legal job I could find in the horrific 2008 economy, I got experience working with attorneys and finally figured out I wanted to be one. If you have zero experience with what it will be like to be an attorney, I highly recommend you get some before investing any time or money into the LSAT/application process. I would honestly think that your self-professed motivation and laziness would be a major hindrance to your success.

MCRemix
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby MCRemix » Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:23 am

Alex-Trof wrote:Bottom line, I will probably not be crazy about doing anything that requires me to get up at 7 or 8 am and actually do anything meaningful or useful. I am, basically, lazy, but, with enough financial incentive and no other options will put up a necessary amount of work. Would it be wrong for me to go to law school? Will I be surrounded by people eager to join a workforce and dig into whatever pile of documents they will have in the office? Are there any people in law school who are doing it "for the love of money" or prestige? Lastly, do you think it will be difficult for me to get good grades or a job offer because of it?


Buddy, most of us are from the generation of slackers, ignore anyone here that bashes you for being you. You're admittedly lazy and aren't bothered by the label, so hey, be you.

That said, the answers to your questions are (in order): No, Yes, Yes, Yes

Two major possibilities for you:
1-You succeed in law school despite your penchant for not working very hard and make it to BigLaw where you find that you absolutely hate the hours.
2-You end up in the bottom of your class and don't make it to BigLaw, but now you can barely afford your student loans (if you're employed at all).

I'm not saying it's wrong to want to be a bit lazy, do whatever you want friend, but I'd think twice about trying to make big bucks in law if thats the way you want to live.

Just my two cents, anyone else have something more motivating for our friend?

Renzo
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Renzo » Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:29 am

You can find much, much better jobs for a lazy smart person, and I say that as someone who admires a bit of laziness.

There are plenty of people in it for the money and/or prestige. But if they are successful, they tend to be so motivated by money and prestige that they do want to get up early and stay late, just to get more. Law isn't a good profession for someone who wants just enough money/prestige, and would be happy with that.

I came to law school as a second career, partially because I knew it would be long hours and lots of money, and I was working three jobs for no prestige and only decent money before the switch--not because I needed to work three jobs, but because I hate downtime. Law seemed like a way to work the same amount, but for more money and prestige.

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Alex-Trof
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 2:21 am

aspire2more wrote:I'm a 0L too so take my advice for what it's worth.
There's nothing written that says you have to want to be an attorney from childhood. I wanted to be a postal worker at age 5 and a doctor at age 16. I did not pursue either of those career paths. Through classes and internships in undergrad and then really falling into the first legal job I could find in the horrific 2008 economy, I got experience working with attorneys and finally figured out I wanted to be one. If you have zero experience with what it will be like to be an attorney, I highly recommend you get some before investing any time or money into the LSAT/application process. I would honestly think that your self-professed motivation and laziness would be a major hindrance to your success.


I thought about getting a job for a while and although it is going to be difficult, I think that I know how to BS my way into a decent job (have done that before on a few occasions). Besides I have some strong connections to a secondary market even if I end up in the bottom half of the class, not to brag, but I was also a part of somewhat prestigious public service organization that helps out their alumni in finding jobs really well. So I think I can find job if I really have to. Unfortunately, it is too lake for me to worry about LSAT and application process. I have already applied and been accepted to a top 10 school. Still waiting to see if I got any scholarships, probably not :-(. You are right however, in any case it is a huge gamble.

I know I probably should care about what attorney's day is like on the regular basis but I did some research and could fairly articulately imagine what it is like. Regardless, I know that any kind of work will not be anything that I will be crazy about. I tried many things. The way I look at it, if I have to work, I might as well apply myself and make some money. Besides, I feel that the fact that I make money and have a lot of debt that I cant get rid of will sort of push me to work harder than having no consequences to not working will. I don't know. Thanks for the advice everybody, very interesting to see what people have to say.

P.S. I did work a job that required 80 hour work weeks and it sucked, but it sucked no more than a job that required 40 hours. Jobs that are too relaxed seem to be very boring and make your time go by much slower when you are at work.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Hey-O » Sun Feb 20, 2011 2:32 am

Are you still in undergrad? Or just out of it? If so then I would definitely not go to law school, especially if you don't get a good scholarship. Get a job and see if you hate working as much as you think you'll hate working. Then go to law school.

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Alex-Trof
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 2:39 am

Hey-O wrote:Are you still in undergrad? Or just out of it? If so then I would definitely not go to law school, especially if you don't get a good scholarship. Get a job and see if you hate working as much as you think you'll hate working. Then go to law school.


Nope, have graduated 2.5 years ago. worked very many different things starting with environmental biology and anding with being financial analyst for an investment management company.Have enough experience to assume that I am just "not crazy about" working altogether regardless of what it is I do. And I do not want to wait any longer since there seem to be a bias against hiring older students.

Renzo
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Renzo » Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:29 pm

Alex-Trof wrote:
Hey-O wrote:Are you still in undergrad? Or just out of it? If so then I would definitely not go to law school, especially if you don't get a good scholarship. Get a job and see if you hate working as much as you think you'll hate working. Then go to law school.


Nope, have graduated 2.5 years ago. worked very many different things starting with environmental biology and anding with being financial analyst for an investment management company.Have enough experience to assume that I am just "not crazy about" working altogether regardless of what it is I do. And I do not want to wait any longer since there seem to be a bias against hiring older students.

You're nowhere near old enough to worry about age bias, so that's not a good reason to jump now. You ever consider another profession, where there's a bit more actual autonomy, like pharmacist or dentist/dental hygenist? Those would be less money than biglaw for a lot less work.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby AreJay711 » Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:39 pm

If you are motivated by money go into finance. It isn't easier than biglaw nor easier to get a job in but you can work your way up in finance (if you didn't got to hyp) and won't need to borrow 200k to start your career. I think the reason why people give the advice to only go to law school if you want to be a lawyer is because you will be stuck working as a lawyer for a pretty long time just to repay your loans and won't really be able to switch careers. In most careers, using finance as my example, if you don't like it, you can leave and use the experience to improve your resume for something you think you might like more without a whole lot of grief.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Renzo » Sun Feb 20, 2011 1:45 pm

AreJay711 wrote:If you are motivated by money go into finance. It isn't easier than biglaw nor easier to get a job in but you can work your way up in finance (if you didn't got to hyp) and won't need to borrow 200k to start your career. I think the reason why people give the advice to only go to law school if you want to be a lawyer is because you will be stuck working as a lawyer for a pretty long time just to repay your loans and won't really be able to switch careers. In most careers, using finance as my example, if you don't like it, you can leave and use the experience to improve your resume for something you think you might like more without a whole lot of grief.

Agreed. Since it sounds like you've got a real job now, work another year or two and get into a good MBA program. You'll have many more options for decent paying prestigious jobs, some of which might not require working like a slave.

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Alex-Trof
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 2:08 pm

Renzo wrote:
AreJay711 wrote:If you are motivated by money go into finance. It isn't easier than biglaw nor easier to get a job in but you can work your way up in finance (if you didn't got to hyp) and won't need to borrow 200k to start your career. I think the reason why people give the advice to only go to law school if you want to be a lawyer is because you will be stuck working as a lawyer for a pretty long time just to repay your loans and won't really be able to switch careers. In most careers, using finance as my example, if you don't like it, you can leave and use the experience to improve your resume for something you think you might like more without a whole lot of grief.

Agreed. Since it sounds like you've got a real job now, work another year or two and get into a good MBA program. You'll have many more options for decent paying prestigious jobs, some of which might not require working like a slave.


That is a possibility. However, I majored in finance and know what that kind of a job entails. Even if I do that I will have to work just as hard if not harder, will take on debt (maybe not as much but still), and will have just as much uncertainty about job prospects. It is even less attractive considering that there are no kids straight out of college in the MBA program and you basically compete with everybody on the same level regardless of grades. I am assuming, that interviewing for Bain or Goldman Sachs is more difficult than for a top law firm.

When it comes to the career prospects, there are two ways to make money after an MBA: consulting or investment banking. Both of those take insane amount of hours (especially investment banking) and often require travel (consulting). I don't think those professions tolerate slacking any more than law. Besides they are a bigger a gamble in sense that if I suck I am very unlikely to make any money in business. Law, I think, is somewhat less cutthroat. I don't know though. Thanks for advice guys.

P.S. Average age in most law schools I think is around 24. And even if it is not that big of a deal to be older, I will fill much less comfortable sacrificing my lifestyle to go back to school when I am older than do it now while I am young. There might be family obligations, debt load will look scarier. Besides it might suck to be one of those older people at a social mixer.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Renzo » Sun Feb 20, 2011 4:01 pm

Alex-Trof wrote:
Renzo wrote:
AreJay711 wrote:If you are motivated by money go into finance. It isn't easier than biglaw nor easier to get a job in but you can work your way up in finance (if you didn't got to hyp) and won't need to borrow 200k to start your career. I think the reason why people give the advice to only go to law school if you want to be a lawyer is because you will be stuck working as a lawyer for a pretty long time just to repay your loans and won't really be able to switch careers. In most careers, using finance as my example, if you don't like it, you can leave and use the experience to improve your resume for something you think you might like more without a whole lot of grief.

Agreed. Since it sounds like you've got a real job now, work another year or two and get into a good MBA program. You'll have many more options for decent paying prestigious jobs, some of which might not require working like a slave.


That is a possibility. However, I majored in finance and know what that kind of a job entails. Even if I do that I will have to work just as hard if not harder, will take on debt (maybe not as much but still), and will have just as much uncertainty about job prospects. It is even less attractive considering that there are no kids straight out of college in the MBA program and you basically compete with everybody on the same level regardless of grades. I am assuming, that interviewing for Bain or Goldman Sachs is more difficult than for a top law firm.

When it comes to the career prospects, there are two ways to make money after an MBA: consulting or investment banking. Both of those take insane amount of hours (especially investment banking) and often require travel (consulting). I don't think those professions tolerate slacking any more than law. Besides they are a bigger a gamble in sense that if I suck I am very unlikely to make any money in business. Law, I think, is somewhat less cutthroat. I don't know though. Thanks for advice guys.

P.S. Average age in most law schools I think is around 24. And even if it is not that big of a deal to be older, I will fill much less comfortable sacrificing my lifestyle to go back to school when I am older than do it now while I am young. There might be family obligations, debt load will look scarier. Besides it might suck to be one of those older people at a social mixer.


I'm significantly older than you. It's a little weird, but nothing to obsess about. Employers like it (up to the point where you're closer to the end of your career than the beginning), and most of my classmates don't care, but it does make it hard to relate to the 22 year olds who have never had a job or cooked their own meals in their lives.

As for your MBA/JD assessment, there isn't much difference between the likelihood of employment, the workload, expectations, or cutthroatness of biglaw v. consulting/banking. All of them offer almost no job security, and you can pretty much expect to be bounced out after a few years. The difference is in the flexibility of the MBA. It would be much, much easier to find (for example) a C-level job at a small-cap corporation that would pay the bills without requiring you to kill yourself after a few years in consulting than it would be to do anything but be a lawyer with a law degree. A law degree is great if you want to be a lawyer, but its a millstone around your neck if you ever want to do anything else.

I came to law school as an old man, because I was 100% sure I want to practice law for an entire career; if I was less sure what kind of work I wanted I would have gone for an MBA.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby kublaikahn » Sun Feb 20, 2011 4:12 pm

OP, you don't want to be a lawyer nor do you want to be corporate timber. What you want to be is an entrepreneur. Find a need and fill it. A variation on a theme. Import/export, go green, whatever. Own your job and you can wake up when you want.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby AreJay711 » Sun Feb 20, 2011 4:22 pm

kublaikahn wrote:OP, you don't want to be a lawyer nor do you want to be corporate timber. What you want to be is an entrepreneur. Find a need and fill it. A variation on a theme. Import/export, go green, whatever. Own your job and you can wake up when you want.

Easier said than done and most entrepreneurs work for other people first to get an understanding of the industry first and typically work even more than professionals (and probably spend more sleepless nights when not working worrying).

OP, to be honest I'm not sure that I will like biglaw myself (because I wasn't one of the smart ones that worked as a biglaw paralegal first) but I am at least sure that I want to be a lawyer and will be going to a school that has a very attractive LRAP program that covers any legal job rather than just PI legal work. I would consider how you would like being a lawyer with just a slightly above median income before I made the jump to pay over 100k for law school.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 4:59 pm

Renzo wrote:
I'm significantly older than you. It's a little weird, but nothing to obsess about. Employers like it (up to the point where you're closer to the end of your career than the beginning), and most of my classmates don't care, but it does make it hard to relate to the 22 year olds who have never had a job or cooked their own meals in their lives.

As for your MBA/JD assessment, there isn't much difference between the likelihood of employment, the workload, expectations, or cutthroatness of biglaw v. consulting/banking. All of them offer almost no job security, and you can pretty much expect to be bounced out after a few years. The difference is in the flexibility of the MBA. It would be much, much easier to find (for example) a C-level job at a small-cap corporation that would pay the bills without requiring you to kill yourself after a few years in consulting than it would be to do anything but be a lawyer with a law degree. A law degree is great if you want to be a lawyer, but its a millstone around your neck if you ever want to do anything else.

I came to law school as an old man, because I was 100% sure I want to practice law for an entire career; if I was less sure what kind of work I wanted I would have gone for an MBA.


That's true I might be able to get a job like that. The problem is that I right now have a C-level job at a small-cap corporation. It is ok, but really boring. People are too slow, I feel like half of the time I just sit there and read news. It feels like going to top law school will give at least some shot at being better than average.

Plus, given that I already have a degree in finance, there isn't much for me to learn in the business school. I also feel like MBA is not a real degree. You don't learn a trade, you learn to network and interview (especially people who had their undergraduate degree in a business field). Personally, I hate networking and would rather spend my time studying something remotely interesting and new in the library than endlessly bugging people I don't know about jobs. I am definitely more of a bookworm than a people person. That said, you probably are right that I still have time, but since I got accepted to a t10 school, I feel like I don't want to miss out on this opportunity now, especially since I may not be accepted to a good school next time.

And you are right about practicing law, but again, I don't want to do anything else either. I am not even certain that I wanna stay in business. Law degree might give me an opportunity to leave business world, MBA will not. There is, of course, one thing that I don't like. MBA is an international degree, which would allow me to work in places like Dubai or Singapore. Law degree, not so much.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:07 pm

AreJay711 wrote:
kublaikahn wrote:OP, you don't want to be a lawyer nor do you want to be corporate timber. What you want to be is an entrepreneur. Find a need and fill it. A variation on a theme. Import/export, go green, whatever. Own your job and you can wake up when you want.

Easier said than done and most entrepreneurs work for other people first to get an understanding of the industry first and typically work even more than professionals (and probably spend more sleepless nights when not working worrying).

OP, to be honest I'm not sure that I will like biglaw myself (because I wasn't one of the smart ones that worked as a biglaw paralegal first) but I am at least sure that I want to be a lawyer and will be going to a school that has a very attractive LRAP program that covers any legal job rather than just PI legal work. I would consider how you would like being a lawyer with just a slightly above median income before I made the jump to pay over 100k for law school.

\

+1 about entrepreneurship.

Yeah the school I am thing about going to has a decent LRAP program as well. Plus I have strong ties to a decent secondary market (Phoenix). Recently, I've read someone's confession about his experience in BigLaw in New York, I believe. That person claimed that job sucked and most people he worked with did not like it. He was there for the money and because couldn't find a job with a DA office (or was not looking that hard after getting an offer). I wonder if this is fairly common, because I just cannot picture people being thrilled about tax law or some complicated litigation, where you have to read tons of stuff that even the biggest nerds would find extremely boring.

Sometimes I feel that the fact that I expect my future job to suck, regardless of what it is, makes me more ready for it and less likely to be disappointed.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Renzo » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:16 pm

Alex-Trof wrote:
AreJay711 wrote:
kublaikahn wrote:OP, you don't want to be a lawyer nor do you want to be corporate timber. What you want to be is an entrepreneur. Find a need and fill it. A variation on a theme. Import/export, go green, whatever. Own your job and you can wake up when you want.

Easier said than done and most entrepreneurs work for other people first to get an understanding of the industry first and typically work even more than professionals (and probably spend more sleepless nights when not working worrying).

OP, to be honest I'm not sure that I will like biglaw myself (because I wasn't one of the smart ones that worked as a biglaw paralegal first) but I am at least sure that I want to be a lawyer and will be going to a school that has a very attractive LRAP program that covers any legal job rather than just PI legal work. I would consider how you would like being a lawyer with just a slightly above median income before I made the jump to pay over 100k for law school.

\

+1 about entrepreneurship.

Yeah the school I am thing about going to has a decent LRAP program as well. Plus I have strong ties to a decent secondary market (Phoenix). Recently, I've read someone's confession about his experience in BigLaw in New York, I believe. That person claimed that job sucked and most people he worked with did not like it. He was there for the money and because couldn't find a job with a DA office (or was not looking that hard after getting an offer). I wonder if this is fairly common, because I just cannot picture people being thrilled about tax law or some complicated litigation, where you have to read tons of stuff that even the biggest nerds would find extremely boring.

Sometimes I feel that the fact that I expect my future job to suck, regardless of what it is, makes me more ready for it and less likely to be disappointed.


Seems like you actually are in a pretty good position to make this decision, and you're right about job expectations. I am convinced that most of the people who hate biglaw passionately hate it because they don't understand that all work sucks and involves doing a bunch of boring shit for people who don't appreciate it--that's not unique to biglaw. At the same time, just make sure you aren't falling for a "grass is greener" delusion about law as compared to business. They aren't that different.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby rose711 » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:20 pm

Are you serious?

You will hate law school. You will hate your law job, should you get one.

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Alex-Trof
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:37 pm

Renzo wrote:
Seems like you actually are in a pretty good position to make this decision, and you're right about job expectations. I am convinced that most of the people who hate biglaw passionately hate it because they don't understand that all work sucks and involves doing a bunch of boring shit for people who don't appreciate it--that's not unique to biglaw. At the same time, just make sure you aren't falling for a "grass is greener" delusion about law as compared to business. They aren't that different.


Thank you for saying that. Makes me feel much better knowing that there are people here who do not think that working for a law firm is the greatest joy a person can have. Because I was reading someone's threat and that person was really angry about his friend who was in the top 10% of his class and was not sure about wanting to be a lawyer. The attitude was: "how dare this person take precious space in this law school without being 120% sure that law is the only thing that he wants to until death."

I have another question. It seems to me that people who go to better law schools do not seem to be as crazy about practicing law as someone who goes to say Appalachian State or Cooley (nothing personal against those who go there). Is it so?

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Alex-Trof
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby Alex-Trof » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:47 pm

rose711 wrote:Are you serious?

You will hate law school. You will hate your law job, should you get one.


Pretty serious. LOL

I actually think I will not hate law school. I think law school will be pretty fun. Not every class, of course, but given the flexibility of taking anything I wish, I think I will enjoy it. I do like theoretical debates and arguments. Short arguments was my favorite part of LSAT :-).

I wouldn't say I will necessarily hate "law job" (I assume we are talking about being an associate for a law firm), but I don't think that I will love it. But what else do you suggest? I will not like working regardless of what I do. I can't just sit at home, I need money to survive. At least I have a shot at making more money than an average person and some bragging rights.

P.S. My job counselor in college used to say: " Go to the bookstore and pick a magazine that you like to read the most and that should be your career." The only magazines I like to read are the ones with very expensive cars and beautiful women. I think that makes me a person that like "burning more than earning". I don't mind working to have nice things in life.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby BeenDidThat » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:54 pm

Alex-Trof wrote:
Renzo wrote:
Seems like you actually are in a pretty good position to make this decision, and you're right about job expectations. I am convinced that most of the people who hate biglaw passionately hate it because they don't understand that all work sucks and involves doing a bunch of boring shit for people who don't appreciate it--that's not unique to biglaw. At the same time, just make sure you aren't falling for a "grass is greener" delusion about law as compared to business. They aren't that different.


Thank you for saying that. Makes me feel much better knowing that there are people here who do not think that working for a law firm is the greatest joy a person can have. Because I was reading someone's threat and that person was really angry about his friend who was in the top 10% of his class and was not sure about wanting to be a lawyer. The attitude was: "how dare this person take precious space in this law school without being 120% sure that law is the only thing that he wants to until death."

I have another question. It seems to me that people who go to better law schools do not seem to be as crazy about practicing law as someone who goes to say Appalachian State or Cooley (nothing personal against those who go there). Is it so?


Being highly irrational is actually a requirement for admission at Appalachian State and Cooley.

And, my quip aside, I think I know what you're getting at. I think it's a symptom of a high correlation between analytical ability and realism (or, as some would say, cynicism). I'm not gonna go too deep down that rabbit hole right now, though.

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Re: A question of motivation

Postby BeenDidThat » Sun Feb 20, 2011 5:56 pm

Alex-Trof wrote:
rose711 wrote:Are you serious?

You will hate law school. You will hate your law job, should you get one.


Pretty serious. LOL

I actually think I will not hate law school. I think law school will be pretty fun. Not every class, of course, but given the flexibility of taking anything I wish, I think I will enjoy it. I do like theoretical debates and arguments. Short arguments was my favorite part of LSAT :-).

I wouldn't say I will necessarily hate "law job" (I assume we are talking about being an associate for a law firm), but I don't think that I will love it. But what else do you suggest? I will not like working regardless of what I do. I can't just sit at home, I need money to survive. At least I have a shot at making more money than an average person and some bragging rights.

P.S. My job counselor in college used to say: " Go to the bookstore and pick a magazine that you like to read the most and that should be your career." The only magazines I like to read are the ones with very expensive cars and beautiful women. I think that makes me a person that like "burning more than earning". I don't mind working to have nice things in life.


I'm gonna say that I think you should go to law school.

You sound like me. I don't particularly mind working, but I don't like it, and I highly doubt that I would ever derive happiness directly from anything that could qualify as "work". But I recognize that I can get more of the things I want by providing high-quality services to meet other people's demands, and that's cool with me. And law doesn't seem too bad compared to other professions.

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JazzOne
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Re: A question of motivation

Postby JazzOne » Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:01 pm

Renzo wrote:You can find much, much better jobs for a lazy smart person, and I say that as someone who admires a bit of laziness.

There are plenty of people in it for the money and/or prestige. But if they are successful, they tend to be so motivated by money and prestige that they do want to get up early and stay late, just to get more. Law isn't a good profession for someone who wants just enough money/prestige, and would be happy with that.

I came to law school as a second career, partially because I knew it would be long hours and lots of money, and I was working three jobs for no prestige and only decent money before the switch--not because I needed to work three jobs, but because I hate downtime. Law seemed like a way to work the same amount, but for more money and prestige.

+1

I was working two jobs with long hours for shit pay and no respect. I'd rather work one job with long hours for awesome pay and little respect. Of course, presuming you will get biglaw is a recipe for disappointment.

rose711
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Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2011 11:57 pm

Re: A question of motivation

Postby rose711 » Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:09 pm

Alex-Trof wrote:
rose711 wrote:Are you serious?

You will hate law school. You will hate your law job, should you get one.


Pretty serious. LOL

I actually think I will not hate law school. I think law school will be pretty fun. Not every class, of course, but given the flexibility of taking anything I wish, I think I will enjoy it. I do like theoretical debates and arguments. Short arguments was my favorite part of LSAT :-).

I wouldn't say I will necessarily hate "law job" (I assume we are talking about being an associate for a law firm), but I don't think that I will love it. But what else do you suggest? I will not like working regardless of what I do. I can't just sit at home, I need money to survive. At least I have a shot at making more money than an average person and some bragging rights.

P.S. My job counselor in college used to say: " Go to the bookstore and pick a magazine that you like to read the most and that should be your career." The only magazines I like to read are the ones with very expensive cars and beautiful women. I think that makes me a person that like "burning more than earning". I don't mind working to have nice things in life.


You don't know what you are talking about when you discuss law school.

And I said "law job" because I doubt that you will find a job at a firm, but possibly you might find a job related to law somewhere.

I'm not a career advisor but it sounds like the one you had was terrible. I can advise you on law, and I think you will hate it. If you are going into debt to go to school, you are making a mistake.

But, go ahead, give it a whirl and let us know how it goes after your first semester. You can always drop out without too much debt.




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