No Offer Guide and Support thread (no advice for SAs, 1Ls)

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No Offer Guide and Support thread (no advice for SAs, 1Ls)

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:02 pm

GUIDE TO GETTING NO OFFERED

I am a guy who got no offered back in summer 2012, and I wanted to write somewhat about my experience in not getting an offer from my SA firm. I considered posting this under my username, but this gets a little too personal, so I decided against it. Suffice it to say I am a TLS regular with over 5000 posts. You have probably read my posts before. If you think you know who this is, please keep it to yourself.

I wanted to write this guide because there is so much emphasis here on TLS about “just get that SA and then you’re golden.” Maybe that’s the case if you’re working at big NYC firms that tend to make offers to everyone every year, but that was not my experience. This is not a guide to how to get an offer or one of those threads where people share funny stupid SA stories. This is a guide about about how to deal with getting no offered or what to do after. People who do post about getting no offered tend to get inundated with “what did you do wrong bro” and “out that TTT firm,” as people want to convince themselves it can’t or won’t happen to them. But it can happen. Hell, I know at least two people who split their summer and got no offered from two firms. When so many people get offers from their summer firm and you don’t you will feel left out and alone. But you’re not. No offer rates were at 90% at NALP firms my year. ALWAYS REMEMBER YOU ARE NOT ALONE.

I know I felt at a loss when I did not get an offer from my summer firm, but I secured a job before I graduated and god willing I will pass the bar. I don’t know whether this experience made me a “stronger person” but I thought I’d share anyway. Not getting an offer and looking for a job as a 3L was a miserable experience.

This isn’t gonna be a guide to pat you on the back and tell you it’s all gonna be okay. I’m not gonna blow smoke up your ass and tell you that. It may not be okay. A no offer can majorly fuck you. But hopefully this may be of some help to you.

1. Getting the bad news

You will know you are getting no offered when you get the news that the firm is “unable to make you an offer.” This is the language that often gets used, as if the decision was totally out of the firm’s hands and not a decision the firm actively made about you. It’s some doublespeak horseshit. Let’s call a spade a spade; you just got no offered.

You may be called on the phone by the hiring partner. Now that is a shitty conversation because you’re probably going to be feeling a lot of anger and sadness when talking to someone who has always acted so happy towards you, has been so concerned about whether you’ve been having a good summer, was so excited when accepted your SA offer, etc. No way around it, this sucks. Keep the call short. You don’t want to talk to this person any more than you have to at this point. You can always call back.

You may get an email with the news saying to “call if you wish to discuss.” Don’t call until you feel you can talk to this person without wanting to scream at them for assfucking you. You can call later. They’re not going anywhere.

They may tell you in person. I only have heard stories about this so I can’t comment on this much.

Maybe you knew this call was coming. Maybe you didn’t. The point is now you’re here. You have been no offered

2. What to do when you get the call

If you are anything like me, you’re gonna feel pretty pissed, like you’re been stabbed in the back. This feeling is totally understandable. The firm probably told you garbage like “just don’t screw up and you’ll get an offer!” or “we have space for all of you!” You’re probably gonna feel pretty left out, as you’ve probably been hearing about your friends getting offers, and you didn’t, both at your firm and others.

There will be plenty of time to agonize about this, so feel free to give yourself a chance to mourn. Want to get drunk? Get drunk. I don’t suggest getting drunk with any of those happy fucks who got offers. Drink alone and talk to the bartender or with similarly situated people. Or play golf. Or go for a hike by yourself. Hang out with non law school friends. Do what you need to do to get away. Eventually you’re gonna want to get back on the horse. But now is not that time.

3. Figuring out why

Eventually, you’re going to want to figure out why you didn’t get an offer. This is important for a few reasons. First, you need closure on the experience, and to enable yourself to move forward you don’t want to keep wondering as to why. Second, you need something to tell to employers when they ask (and they might) about why you didn’t get an offer from your summer firm. Lastly, if/when you do get another job you need to know how not to make those mistakes (if you did make mistakes).

So you owe it to yourself to ask. Talking to the hiring partner from your firm, as distasteful as that may be for you, it is not a bad idea. It’s their job to tell you what happened. Sometimes they will tell you the reason and you already knew why. Maybe you fucked up a project or you just rubbed someone the wrong way who was in a decision-making position.

However, keep in mind that the hiring partner is not your friend, that he is looking out for you, and that he has his own interests to take care of. Do NOT blindly adopt what they say as truth. For your own mental health and to get in the mindset to talk to employers. Think critically and if you can, call someone else at the firm you can TRUST to talk about it, too. There may be another supplemental or ancillary reason they are keeping from you. This means you may never get a straight answer. Yeah that sucks, but you gotta ask.

Example. A friend called the hiring partner who told him a reason why he didn’t get an offer. He didn’t think the reason made a lot of sense. So he called up someone he trusted at the firm who basically said that every year the firm lies to summers and says they have room for all of them, when it’s not true. This trusted person said that the reason the hiring partner told him may or may not have been true, and told him it may also have come down to working in a less busy area, and the school he went to. I don’t think he ever figured out what really went down.

Another example. A friend of mine got no offered for I think it was “work product.” But after that went down, he found out that no offers were rampant in the city and a few too many people seemed to be leaving his old firm. He started hearing rumors about financial trouble. So while work product may have been a part of it, there may have been another monetary reason. He never really figured out why, either. Maybe it was a little of both. But it doesn’t take a genius to see why the firm might not have wanted to tell him “we are not doing so hot” right before OCI. In subsequent interviews, he was able to say with a straight face, “It was budgetary.”

Another example. A friend of mine got no offered because the hiring partner said he did not show as much “potential” as the others. What does that even mean? That sounds like complete shit.

Again, let me stress that you need to ask, but don’t just accept what they say as gospel, because they’re looking out for the firm, not you. My favorite part of my own call was when the hiring partner told me, “I know this probably won’t help, but everybody really liked you.” Lol, just lol. Of course that’s not helpful.

4. Dealing with the outside world

You’re probably gonna be feeling pretty shitty right now. While your friends have offers and are busy trying to decide what trendy area of Yuppieville they want to live in, you are wondering how you will eat or whether your parents will let you live in your old bedroom. People with offers are partying hard because they are stoked. You are partying hard because you have lost all hope or you are just drinking because you are sad. You look for jobs and you get rejection after rejection.

My advice: Do whatever you gotta do to maintain sanity

In my case that was basically avoiding everyone who had a job, which was a lot of my friends. Not because they weren’t trying to be supportive, they just didn’t really “get it,” the situation of being no offered. They didn’t know how to help, and many did not realize how lucky they were. “Did you apply for clerkships?” Yeah that’s not advice, that’s shit. “This experience will only make you stronger!” You have no idea what you’re talking about so shut your damn mouth. "I really hate the person who is going to be my office mate next year at biglaw!" I hope you rupture your appendix. Getting offers from their firms meant that they were totally insulated from the daily struggle of trying do 3L job search while trying not to fling myself off a bridge.

I hung out almost exclusively with non law people and people without jobs. Some of the people without jobs were in a tough place, drinking heavily and doing drugs to cope. But they were all way more supportive than 3Ls with jobs who had no fucking clue what was going on. My non law school friends were cool as well, including my non law school girlfriend. They were all pretty supportive, but by the end I think I was beginning to grate on them because I was depressing all the time.

One final note: I worked in the same city as my firm and used to see people from the firm around all the time. This REALLY sucked. Often I would try to avoid them. Sometimes they would recognize me and say nothing because they were embarrassed I guess or didn’t have anything to say. It was always very unpleasant seeing these people around because they were a constant reminder of something I was trying to move past. At first I talked to a couple of associates when I saw them, people I was friends with at work, and it didn’t make me feel any better. So I quit that. No point. Don’t do it for “networking” if afterward you feel like shit.

5. Dealing with it yourself

After I didn’t get an offer, my confidence was pretty shattered. I had a good experience (so I thought) at my SA and it was a shock when I didn’t get an offer. I worked really hard 1L year to get good grades, then really hard at OCI to get that offer, and I tried my best to do a good job at work. So when I didn’t get the job it basically just fucked my confidence. For months I would literally think about not having a job from the moment I woke up until the moment I went to sleep; it constantly occupied my thoughts and impaired some of my relationships as a result. Most days I alternated between wanting to break someone’s jaw all the way down to just breaking down and sleeping all day.

This goes without saying, but try not to go down the substance abuse path. Yeah, sometimes if feels really good to have a few drinks in the afternoon so the anxiety will go away, or to go to class drunk, but now is not the time to be developing a substance abuse problem. Some people I knew without jobs were self-medicating with drugs, tobacco, alcohol, and mood-altering pharmaceuticals.

If you can, talk to a counselor. Your state bar will probably have some free ones that specialize in lawyers and law students. You’re not weird if you do this. You’d be surprised at how many of your classmates go on the sneak. I went through that whole 5 stages of grief thing and counseling was very helpful to deal with some of those feelings. It was nice to be able to go in and just vent to someone else. By March (8 months later) I think I finally reached the acceptance stage (which was before I actually did get a job), though I’d be lying if I said I didn’t still harbor ill will today about what happened.

Just remember. You’re not an idiot or worthless; make a list of what you are good at. Seriously. Life will not end if you don’t get another big firm job (I didn’t), and it won’t end if you never get a legal job. Law school does its best to convince you that it’s the be all end all, and the grades/journal/OCI rat race can make it easy to measure your worth by those accomplishments. Don’t. It’s shit. Law is not some “calling” where it would be the only thing you’d be happy doing. If you honestly think that, you have some problems. Law is something you want to do because you think you’d be decent at it and because you can make a little money to do what ACTUALLY makes you happy. There is plenty of stuff you’d be happy and good at doing, career-wise, whether you realize that or not, and working as a lawyer or not working as a lawyer doesn’t have to define who you are. It’s easy to let it though – don’t.

6. Getting another job

I assume if you’re reading this you’re unwilling to starve on the street, so you’re gonna have to get another job. I’ll be frank with you, this process fucking sucks. Be prepared for a lot of rejection. There’s a reason why the thread is called the Vale of Tears.

On the plus side, your firm experience is valuable to firms. Firms want to hire people who want to work at firms. The downside is coming up with a good story to explain not getting an offer. This will be highly specific to each person, but the best answer will explain quickly why you didn’t get an offer without dwelling on it, and then stress why you want the job you’re interviewing for. Be really upbeat in interviews, say you had a good experience (even if you think it was shit, you probably learned something), and even if you are bitter, don’t look like you are. Above all, confidence.

Ex. “I did not receive an offer from my summer firm. My summer firm has a track record of not giving offers to everyone every summer, especially in this economy, this summer was no different. That said, I had a positive experience; I learned [XYZ]. I am especially attracted to working at your firm because of its strong specialty in [XYZ] and because [other reasons you want the firm].”

If you’re lucky, your interviewer may not ask. In 5 interviews, I think I was only asked once. I had an offer from state govt., and they didn’t ask. I just kept saying I really wanted to work in government. The firm I got an offer from did not ask either. I had relevant experience, an in at the firm, and I was interviewing back home, which I hit on HARD. I wasn’t even sure that my current firm knew what my summer firm was. YMMV if you worked at some massive Vault firm though.

If you can, get someone who can speak on your behalf from your old firm. Someone who can speak to the quality of your work. Be VERY careful with this. I remember reading at least one story in the Vale where a hiring partner told a person he would give a favorable recommendation, then later gave a less than favorable one. A friend of mine had a similar experience. Make sure it’s someone you can trust. Try to do a legal internship or something during that fall if you need another good reference.

If you CSO wasn’t helpful before, they are unlikely to be helpful now. CSO wasn’t that helpful for me personally. My CSO person was really nice, fairly knowledgeable, and a good person to bitch to/at, so I appreciated that.

Radlulz posted a good summary of the 3L job search in the Vale thread (check the OP). I’d like to add some caveats and gloss.

rad lulz wrote:There is no 3L hiring "season."


This is pretty much true. Obviously federal clerkships have the Plan (sort of), 3L OCI happens, and BigFed sometimes hires in the fall (all 12 of you lucky enough to get bigfed jobs). But I saw as many firms postings throughout the year as during 3L OCI. And state government is incredibly variable. People get all sorts of jobs during the year, while they study for the bar, and after they pass the bar. There isn’t really a season.

The list below did not mention clerkships. Those will be an option for you if you have the grades. If you are like me and had grades to get a firm job but not top 10% or whatever, clerkships (at least federal) probably won’t happen, especially because those are getting more competitive. Something to think about at least.

3L job search possibilities look like this

1) 3L OCI - HAHAURFUCKED


Pretty much. 3L OCI is small and mainly for people who want to trade up. They’re not really looking for no offered people. But you should participate. Do you have anything better to do? It’ll probably take at most one or two afternoons because hardly anyone shows up.

2) Mass mail - low return for even the minimal amount of time it takes to research/mail merge due to the fact that the firms you mail must want to hire and want to hire AT THE TIME you mail and often they are looking to fill a specific practice need


Pretty much. I heard a couple people who got offers from mass mails, including a guy who got no offered from my firm with me. And yes, 3L job postings tend to want someone for a specific practice area, not just a body. Yet another thing that sucks about the 3L search.

3) Networking - hope you got on that sometime over the past few years


The best relationships are the ones you’ve been nurturing for a while. If you haven’t started, get on it, but you’re behind the ball. This stuff you hear about “unadvertised positions” isn’t bullshit.

4) Symplicity - low response rate but better than mass mailing because those firms are ACTUALLY hiring when you submit your resume.


Agree with this. Add the Govt. Guide and state bar websites. Same idea. Again, postings tend to be specific.

5) Whatever your CSO can scrounge up for you - probably nothing


Nothing to add really

6) Small firm or govt you clerk/intern for during the year - decent option if you can do this; those places may want to hire you or know people who will


I saw these types of arrangements work out for quite a few people, including no offered people. No personal experience however.

Just for reference I included a list of the people I know who got no offered and where they ended up. To preserve anonymity, the lists are ordered by frequency of input and outcome, not by person.

Where people worked
8 – “regional biglaw” firm(s) (anything non-NYC/DC/LA/SF/SV/Chi/Tex)
4 – major market “biglaw” firm(s)
1 – “midlaw” firm(s)
1 – small firm(s)

Where people ended up
4 – unemployed as of this writing
2 – boutique firm
2 – firm they worked at the other half (split summer and got an offer from just one)
1 – “regional biglaw” firm
1 – major market “biglaw” firm
1 – AIII clerk
1 – State appellate clerk
1 – big 3 tax LLM
1 – contract attorney at same firm

7. Good luck

Good luck. I’ll take some Qs in this thread I guess. 3L year was miserable for me, and it may be for you, but I hope it’s not. Whatever you do, don’t give up on yourself.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Thu Jul 04, 2013 11:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:33 pm

Excellent post. Good advice in here, but more than that it accurately describes the experience. Someone (like myself) who was no-offered mostly just needs to know they are not alone and are not the first or last person to be no-offered.

For my part, getting over the confidence issue was a big thing. Someone who is an SA generally has been outperforming their peers for a long time. 12 years or regular school, 4 years of college, the LSAT, 1L, OCI, etc. It seems hard to comprehend that one could be in the top 10% of everything they do and then be one of the few biglaw summers not given an offer. At first that makes you feel worse, but then you realize those decades of work were not a fluke. You really are that smart and capable. Either you messed up in a few short weeks or you got screwed by office politics/the economy. No matter what, the things that made you successful in the past will continue to work in your favor.

Also consider that cliches are often cliches for a reason. The grass often is greener on the other side. Consider the recent (and monumentally obvious) studies showing how depressed biglaw associates are. Consider this a bullet dodged and go do what you really want. (If what you really wanted to do was pour over discovery documents for the Jones litigation, then a) you are beyond saving and b) there are other firms where you can do that and still make more than 95% of the world).

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby rad lulz » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:37 pm

Dood

Thanks for sharing

Ken give this dood $50

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Ludo! » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:51 pm

Awesome guide. Sums up how I felt/feel really well. Getting no offered was basically the worst thing that ever happened to me. I still don't have a job and it's starting to look like I'll never actually work as a lawyer.

If you fear that the bad news is coming I recommend being some place that you really love and being around people you really love. I was in Vegas with my fiance when the calls went out. That helped soften the blow a little bit.

Although, I was taking a shit when the actual call came and that really made it more pitiful. A grown man crying on the toilet is just a pathetic sight.

It does get better. Not in terms of your career recovering necessarily, although that happens for some people, but in terms of acceptance and finding a way to move on. It helps knowing that other people are going through the same thing as you, so I hope this thread helps some people.

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby ExBiglawAssociate » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:53 pm

rad lulz wrote:Ken give this dood $50

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby rad lulz » Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:12 pm

.
Last edited by rad lulz on Wed Sep 21, 2016 7:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:57 pm

I was told in person, on a Monday, when I still had 2 weeks to go. In fact all our clerks were told that week with a few weeks left. I remember the moment really well cause A.) It was awkward as hell and B.) When the hiring partner left my office all I could think about was "Wait, you expect me to do work after this shit happened for 2 more weeks? Yeah, ok." Its pretty crazy too cause at no other point in my life did a few sentences completely change my life that hard. I went from making good money, thinking I was locked in and pitying people who still had to look to basically being in the Vale. I later found a small firm to work for through 3L which told me that work was drying up and they couldn't keep me on after the bar. I am currently still in the Vale.

Oh, and also:

“Did you apply for clerkships?” Yeah that’s not advice, that’s shit. “This experience will only make you stronger!” You have no idea what you’re talking about so shut your damn mouth. "I really hate the person who is going to be my office mate next year at biglaw!" I hope you rupture your appendix.


This is the most amazing thing I have ever read. This shit happened to me day in and day out. 1. Everyone at the firm that no offered me said "You're gonna be fine. Seriously the economy is picking up and you should really aim for Reed Smith and Skadden". Yeah ok, thanks for the tip. When I told one of the partners that I was looking into working for a small firm he had the nerve to tell me he didn't think it was a good idea because small firms didn't pay a lot and I really should be looking higher up the food chain. I did you jackass, that was YOUR firm. That and the constant facebook posts from a few people about how excited they are for their new paychecks, how they are moving to a highrise in manhattan and how they are so glad they don't have to care about 3L grades anymore cause they succeeded at finding work basically made me want to punch walls.

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:06 pm

Which do you guys think is worse, getting no offered after 2L summer, or getting no offered before 2L summer

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby rad lulz » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:14 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Which do you guys think is worse, getting no offered after 2L summer, or getting no offered before 2L summer

After 2L summer, no question

3L job market is so bad

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby rad lulz » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:16 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I was told in person, on a Monday, when I still had 2 weeks to go. In fact all our clerks were told that week with a few weeks left. I remember the moment really well cause A.) It was awkward as hell and B.) When the hiring partner left my office all I could think about was "Wait, you expect me to do work after this shit happened for 2 more weeks? Yeah, ok." Its pretty crazy too cause at no other point in my life did a few sentences completely change my life that hard. I went from making good money, thinking I was locked in and pitying people who still had to look to basically being in the Vale. I later found a small firm to work for through 3L which told me that work was drying up and they couldn't keep me on after the bar. I am currently still in the Vale.


Dude that makes me awkward just reading it. That is absurd.

That and the constant facebook posts from a few people about how excited they are for their new paychecks, how they are moving to a highrise in manhattan and how they are so glad they don't have to care about 3L grades anymore cause they succeeded at finding work basically made me want to punch walls.


Dude I can't +1 this enough

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby mr.hands » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:16 pm

Great post. Thanks for sharing.

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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:30 pm

+1 to everything said previously.

I was also no-offered last summer. I hope you all enjoy my story as well:

A few weeks before heading to the first firm I discovered I had epilepsy and had seizures all of the time. I went on meds, which jacked me up-- this made me have periods of high efficiency followed by periods where I would freeze up/ blank out/ have seizures. I did not tell my summer firm what was going on. In my first week at my firm some 3rd year associate who looked like Ryan Seacrest ("Seacrest Bro") assigned me a bunch of extra diligence work. He also started talking mad crap about how much he hated his job-- I was like his outlet. I spent an extra 40 hours that week and the next doing his work in addition to the other work I had been given. I topped out at 70 or 80-something hours with tons of extra work to do. This caused other attorneys to think I was lazy because it was taking so long for work to be done. I told Seacrest bro that I had to get some other work done for another attorney, and he told the hiring partner I had a bad attitude.

From this experience, the hiring partner felt it was necessary to begin meeting with me weekly to discuss my problem attitude. It was seriously like a scene from office space-- I had no idea what I did wrong but people kept meeting with me. Things started going pretty well again, I had turned in good work and was getting good reviews. I had a few assignments due on this one day before we had to leave for a retreat. I had enough time to finish and felt like this was a turning point for me. However, once again, the Seacrest bro dumped some extra work on me that morning as a chance to redeem myself for wanting to get off of his project. I was basically faced with an unwinnable decision: 1) get labeled as lazy for not turning in the assignments I had already been assigned by these other attorneys, or 2) get labeled again as having "a bad attitude" for not helping Seacrest bro at the last minute.

Anyways, long story short, I did the extra work last minute, got labeled as having a bad attitude by Seacrest anyway, and got labeled as lazy by the other attorneys for having delayed my work while on this retreat. I did get a nice firm jacket on the retreat though. When I got back, the hiring team kept meeting with me, I started having seizures at work-- one attorney was ever like "what is wrong with you?? Are you even listening to me!?" as I had a seizure. The hiring partner gave me an evaluation in my office-- I had a seizure then too. The depressing part is that I missed most of his speech and was tweaking out, but he didn't even notice and then wanted me to tell him what was wrong with me as an attorney.

I stayed later than the rest of the summers, worked harder, but knew that it was over for me. It was easiest to tell it was over when the hiring team stopped checking in, and one of the summers felt the need to become my boss on assignments we were working on together because she had heard through the grapevine that I was a problem. She made errors, blamed them on me, I spend 8 hrs correcting the errors, and then she cried to the hiring team that I had made the errors (and then came to me in private and said "I'm so sorry for blaming you, are we good??"). They believed it, why wouldn't they? Its easy to have one scapegoat instead of two.

I made some good friends while at work-- like 5 or 6 attorneys, including a few partners. They knew I was getting screwed and we all just kicked back and joked about it for the last two or three weeks of the summer. They thought it was crazy what had happened, but helped me cope. I think this is what kept me sane-- they validated that I wasn't sucky, gave me pimp assignments, and we ate lunch at great places pretty much every day. They also made fun of how stupid the feedback I was getting was. Got no-offered over the phone by the hiring partner a few weeks later.

Anyway, I went to my second firm. Did my best. Stayed late every night. Even brought a few clients in. Was given a verbal offer on the last day of work. I got a call in December from the hiring partner saying "just wait, we will get back to you, having some issues." I didn't find out until February that the firm had split into three firms, and hiring partner had left for a different firm. One of the new firms that had formed said they wanted to hire me. I drove 2300 miles across the country to interview with them. Was forced off the freeway by a jerk semi truck during a winter storm and almost rolled my SUV with my newborn baby in the car on the way there. Couldn't afford new brakes or tires-- and maxed out my credit cards for this sure offer (I mean if the former firm offered you, the spin-off would right?) We were lucky not to crash down an embankment or roll. Spent over $1000 of my own money to get out to this interview. They made it sound like they were going to give me the job. I held off on a few other jobs because of this. They sent me a form rejection email with no explanation the day after I had brainstormed with the hiring partner regarding potential start dates. I wanted to cry, but remained hopeful.

On the way back from the interview I was going into Costco in a random flyover state-- I was freezing and forgot my jacket. I looked around in the car and spotted the warm jacket I got at the first firm's retreat under a seat. I had a bad gut feeling not to wear the jacked to Costco, and just buy a Volcom hoodie or something instead-- I thought "why would it matter, you are in the middle of nowhere." As I am checking out, the wife of one of the summers who got an offer at the firm comes walking up to me. She said "aren't you excited that you and my husband are going to be working together at the firm?!" I explained to her that I was going to be working somewhere else-- she then gave me this blank stare, looked at my jacket, and had this expression like "you just couldn't let go of the firm could you loser") Now, I am not only the summer who got no-offered, but some weird stalker guy who wears a jacket the firm gave me after getting no offered.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

NYstate
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby NYstate » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:38 pm

Great post OP.

Regarding recommendations- be careful trusting the hiring partner. They will be asked why their firm didn't hire you. To protect themselves and their firm, they will almost inevitably come up with some negatives. They are never going to say that they have budget issues and they don't want to look like fools for not hiring you in the first place.

If you have other options for recommendations particularly a partner in a specific practice group, maybe try them first.

NYstate
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Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 1:44 am

Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby NYstate » Tue Jul 02, 2013 7:53 pm

Anonymous User wrote:+1 to everything said previously.

I was also no-offered last summer. I hope you all enjoy my story as well:

A few weeks before heading to the first firm I discovered I had epilepsy and had seizures all of the time. I went on meds, which jacked me up-- this made me have periods of high efficiency followed by periods where I would freeze up/ blank out/ have seizures. I did not tell my summer firm what was going on. In my first week at my firm some 3rd year associate who looked like Ryan Seacrest ("Seacrest Bro") assigned me a bunch of extra diligence work. He also started talking mad crap about how much he hated his job-- I was like his outlet. I spent an extra 40 hours that week and the next doing his work in addition to the other work I had been given. I topped out at 70 or 80-something hours with tons of extra work to do. This caused other attorneys to think I was lazy because it was taking so long for work to be done. I told Seacrest bro that I had to get some other work done for another attorney, and he told the hiring partner I had a bad attitude.

From this experience, the hiring partner felt it was necessary to begin meeting with me weekly to discuss my problem attitude. It was seriously like a scene from office space-- I had no idea what I did wrong but people kept meeting with me. Things started going pretty well again, I had turned in good work and was getting good reviews. I had a few assignments due on this one day before we had to leave for a retreat. I had enough time to finish and felt like this was a turning point for me. However, once again, the Seacrest bro dumped some extra work on me that morning as a chance to redeem myself for wanting to get off of his project. I was basically faced with an unwinnable decision: 1) get labeled as lazy for not turning in the assignments I had already been assigned by these other attorneys, or 2) get labeled again as having "a bad attitude" for not helping Seacrest bro at the last minute.

Anyways, long story short, I did the extra work last minute, got labeled as having a bad attitude by Seacrest anyway, and got labeled as lazy by the other attorneys for having delayed my work while on this retreat. I did get a nice firm jacket on the retreat though. When I got back, the hiring team kept meeting with me, I started having seizures at work-- one attorney was ever like "what is wrong with you?? Are you even listening to me!?" as I had a seizure. The hiring partner gave me an evaluation in my office-- I had a seizure then too. The depressing part is that I missed most of his speech and was tweaking out, but he didn't even notice and then wanted me to tell him what was wrong with me as an attorney.

I stayed later than the rest of the summers, worked harder, but knew that it was over for me. It was easiest to tell it was over when the hiring team stopped checking in, and one of the summers felt the need to become my boss on assignments we were working on together because she had heard through the grapevine that I was a problem. She made errors, blamed them on me, I spend 8 hrs correcting the errors, and then she cried to the hiring team that I had made the errors (and then came to me in private and said "I'm so sorry for blaming you, are we good??"). They believed it, why wouldn't they? Its easy to have one scapegoat instead of two.

I made some good friends while at work-- like 5 or 6 attorneys, including a few partners. They knew I was getting screwed and we all just kicked back and joked about it for the last two or three weeks of the summer. They thought it was crazy what had happened, but helped me cope. I think this is what kept me sane-- they validated that I wasn't sucky, gave me pimp assignments, and we ate lunch at great places pretty much every day. They also made fun of how stupid the feedback I was getting was. Got no-offered over the phone by the hiring partner a few weeks later.

Anyway, I went to my second firm. Did my best. Stayed late every night. Even brought a few clients in. Was given a verbal offer on the last day of work. I got a call in December from the hiring partner saying "just wait, we will get back to you, having some issues." I didn't find out until February that the firm had split into three firms, and hiring partner had left for a different firm. One of the new firms that had formed said they wanted to hire me. I drove 2300 miles across the country to interview with them. Was forced off the freeway by a jerk semi truck during a winter storm and almost rolled my SUV with my newborn baby in the car on the way there. Couldn't afford new brakes or tires-- and maxed out my credit cards for this sure offer (I mean if the former firm offered you, the spin-off would right?) We were lucky not to crash down an embankment or roll. Spent over $1000 of my own money to get out to this interview. They made it sound like they were going to give me the job. I held off on a few other jobs because of this. They sent me a form rejection email with no explanation the day after I had brainstormed with the hiring partner regarding potential start dates. I wanted to cry, but remained hopeful.

On the way back from the interview I was going into Costco in a random flyover state-- I was freezing and forgot my jacket. I looked around in the car and spotted the warm jacket I got at the first firm's retreat under a seat. I had a bad gut feeling not to wear the jacked to Costco, and just buy a Volcom hoodie or something instead-- I thought "why would it matter, you are in the middle of nowhere." As I am checking out, the wife of one of the summers who got an offer at the firm comes walking up to me. She said "aren't you excited that you and my husband are going to be working together at the firm?!" I explained to her that I was going to be working somewhere else-- she then gave me this blank stare, looked at my jacket, and had this expression like "you just couldn't let go of the firm could you loser") Now, I am not only the summer who got no-offered, but some weird stalker guy who wears a jacket the firm gave me after getting no offered.


Dude. That sucks. I don't even have words to reply to your post but I'm glad you posted.

I know you might hate hearing shit like this but a firm that doesn't notice if you are having seizures what the fuck else could happen there? It sounds like you could literally die and they might not notice.

rad lulz
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby rad lulz » Tue Jul 02, 2013 8:13 pm

NYstate wrote:Dude. That sucks. I don't even have words to reply to your post but I'm glad you posted.

Anonymous User
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 8:44 pm

Amazing post. The part about the five stages of grief and the blow to self confidence is so incredibly true, but you have to keep in mind how much of this crap is pure luck.

I was an SA after my 1L summer. No offered because I rubbed someone on the hiring committee the wrong way, and she gossiped about it till my reputation was set in stone. After that, they questioned my work product, blamed every miscommunication on me, and made a huge deal about every small thing that wasn't perfect.

When I got the no offer, my confidence was completely shattered. I went from thinking of myself as a cool, funny, likable guy to thinking I must be the biggest aspie on the planet. I went from thinking I might have a shot at partner someday to thinking I'll never work as a lawyer because I'm just completely incompetent.

I managed to get another SA during OCI for after my 2L summer. Got an offer and was repeatedly told that I was the best summer associate of the group, that everyone loved me and thought I was hilarious, and that my work product was top notch.

Still took some time to regain my confidence and realize it was a one-off case of bad luck.

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Ludo!
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Ludo! » Tue Jul 02, 2013 9:48 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Which do you guys think is worse, getting no offered after 2L summer, or getting no offered before 2L summer


What does getting no offered before 2l summer mean? You mean like having a 2l summer job that you know won't result in a permanent offer? They're probably both bad in their own ways. But at least you have more time to prepare if you know going into 2l summer that you still have to look for a job.

I proposed to my girlfriend and started planning/putting down deposits for a wedding thinking that I was going to have a job. I spent the whole summer getting to know people and building relationships that I thought were going to last a long time. I told all my friends and family that I would be getting an offer "unless I do something really crazy like get drunk and jump in the Hudson River." I was pretty set thinking that this is where I would begin my career and that I was going to be a certain type of lawyer.

To have all of that ripped away from you is really fucking devastating. It's like having a steak in your mouth and then someone yanking it out and throwing it in the trash before you can even take a bite. I think I would rather have not have even tasted it at all.

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jeeptiger09
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby jeeptiger09 » Tue Jul 02, 2013 9:57 pm

Great thread, great advice. Just stopped in to say that if you are fortunate enough to get an offer, don't be that asshole who constantly posts on every social media outlet about your offer or your constant firm-world problems. There are enough assholes in law/school.

Anonymous User
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:00 pm

Seizure guy from above.

I just want to say that getting no-offered might not be the end of the world.

I may just be out of the norm, but everyone I know well who has been no-offered (like 6 people) subsequently got big firm jobs. None through OCI. All were through networking right after the summer ended except for one guy that clerked first. He was no-offered because he was the only SA in a practice group and in the office, his partner passed away, and the firm (V20 firm) forgot about him literally. It was only after he called the firm that they were like "oh crap, we forgot about this guy, his partner died and the practice group is gone... cut him." I think some of them were economy dings, some weren't.

09042014
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby 09042014 » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:07 pm

Anonymous User wrote:+1 to everything said previously.

I was also no-offered last summer. I hope you all enjoy my story as well:

A few weeks before heading to the first firm I discovered I had epilepsy and had seizures all of the time. I went on meds, which jacked me up-- this made me have periods of high efficiency followed by periods where I would freeze up/ blank out/ have seizures. I did not tell my summer firm what was going on. In my first week at my firm some 3rd year associate who looked like Ryan Seacrest ("Seacrest Bro") assigned me a bunch of extra diligence work. He also started talking mad crap about how much he hated his job-- I was like his outlet. I spent an extra 40 hours that week and the next doing his work in addition to the other work I had been given. I topped out at 70 or 80-something hours with tons of extra work to do. This caused other attorneys to think I was lazy because it was taking so long for work to be done. I told Seacrest bro that I had to get some other work done for another attorney, and he told the hiring partner I had a bad attitude.

From this experience, the hiring partner felt it was necessary to begin meeting with me weekly to discuss my problem attitude. It was seriously like a scene from office space-- I had no idea what I did wrong but people kept meeting with me. Things started going pretty well again, I had turned in good work and was getting good reviews. I had a few assignments due on this one day before we had to leave for a retreat. I had enough time to finish and felt like this was a turning point for me. However, once again, the Seacrest bro dumped some extra work on me that morning as a chance to redeem myself for wanting to get off of his project. I was basically faced with an unwinnable decision: 1) get labeled as lazy for not turning in the assignments I had already been assigned by these other attorneys, or 2) get labeled again as having "a bad attitude" for not helping Seacrest bro at the last minute.

Anyways, long story short, I did the extra work last minute, got labeled as having a bad attitude by Seacrest anyway, and got labeled as lazy by the other attorneys for having delayed my work while on this retreat. I did get a nice firm jacket on the retreat though. When I got back, the hiring team kept meeting with me, I started having seizures at work-- one attorney was ever like "what is wrong with you?? Are you even listening to me!?" as I had a seizure. The hiring partner gave me an evaluation in my office-- I had a seizure then too. The depressing part is that I missed most of his speech and was tweaking out, but he didn't even notice and then wanted me to tell him what was wrong with me as an attorney.

I stayed later than the rest of the summers, worked harder, but knew that it was over for me. It was easiest to tell it was over when the hiring team stopped checking in, and one of the summers felt the need to become my boss on assignments we were working on together because she had heard through the grapevine that I was a problem. She made errors, blamed them on me, I spend 8 hrs correcting the errors, and then she cried to the hiring team that I had made the errors (and then came to me in private and said "I'm so sorry for blaming you, are we good??"). They believed it, why wouldn't they? Its easy to have one scapegoat instead of two.

I made some good friends while at work-- like 5 or 6 attorneys, including a few partners. They knew I was getting screwed and we all just kicked back and joked about it for the last two or three weeks of the summer. They thought it was crazy what had happened, but helped me cope. I think this is what kept me sane-- they validated that I wasn't sucky, gave me pimp assignments, and we ate lunch at great places pretty much every day. They also made fun of how stupid the feedback I was getting was. Got no-offered over the phone by the hiring partner a few weeks later.

Anyway, I went to my second firm. Did my best. Stayed late every night. Even brought a few clients in. Was given a verbal offer on the last day of work. I got a call in December from the hiring partner saying "just wait, we will get back to you, having some issues." I didn't find out until February that the firm had split into three firms, and hiring partner had left for a different firm. One of the new firms that had formed said they wanted to hire me. I drove 2300 miles across the country to interview with them. Was forced off the freeway by a jerk semi truck during a winter storm and almost rolled my SUV with my newborn baby in the car on the way there. Couldn't afford new brakes or tires-- and maxed out my credit cards for this sure offer (I mean if the former firm offered you, the spin-off would right?) We were lucky not to crash down an embankment or roll. Spent over $1000 of my own money to get out to this interview. They made it sound like they were going to give me the job. I held off on a few other jobs because of this. They sent me a form rejection email with no explanation the day after I had brainstormed with the hiring partner regarding potential start dates. I wanted to cry, but remained hopeful.

On the way back from the interview I was going into Costco in a random flyover state-- I was freezing and forgot my jacket. I looked around in the car and spotted the warm jacket I got at the first firm's retreat under a seat. I had a bad gut feeling not to wear the jacked to Costco, and just buy a Volcom hoodie or something instead-- I thought "why would it matter, you are in the middle of nowhere." As I am checking out, the wife of one of the summers who got an offer at the firm comes walking up to me. She said "aren't you excited that you and my husband are going to be working together at the firm?!" I explained to her that I was going to be working somewhere else-- she then gave me this blank stare, looked at my jacket, and had this expression like "you just couldn't let go of the firm could you loser") Now, I am not only the summer who got no-offered, but some weird stalker guy who wears a jacket the firm gave me after getting no offered.


This is some 180 creative writing.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273359
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:12 pm

NYstate wrote:Regarding recommendations- be careful trusting the hiring partner. They will be asked why their firm didn't hire you. To protect themselves and their firm, they will almost inevitably come up with some negatives. They are never going to say that they have budget issues and they don't want to look like fools for not hiring you in the first place.

If you have other options for recommendations particularly a partner in a specific practice group, maybe try them first.


+ fucking 1

I think I may be the person OP is referring to when he (she?) said "I remember reading at least one story in the Vale where a hiring partner told a person he would give a favorable recommendation, then later gave a less than favorable one."

Story:

After I got the no offer call, they told me it wasn't my fault, and the hiring partner said he'd be more than happy to recommend me to others. Cool. So I get an interview with this midlaw firm I really like in an area I like. I do the phone screener and get the CB the next day. This is my only firm CB in the fall. They want some references, so I ask old firm hiring partner (OFHP) to be one, and OFHP is nice enough to even ask around his firm for me for any inside details about my interview. At this point I am down in the dumps and again, this is my only firm interview. I'm glad to have a good reference from my firm on my side.

So I get down there and I just KILL the interview. By this point I know a good interview when I see one. Everyone really likes me, and they even organize an impromptu meet and greet at a bar for me. These people were seriously awesome. Didn't even ask what happened to me this summer. Some people around town I know even called these guys on my behalf. At this point my self worth was still pretty tied to whether I could get a job, so I was feelin good.

I kept waiting for the decision. They tell me in November it's between me and two other people. It's cool, don't panic, prepare yourself for disappointment just in case. And then it came. The firm hiring partner emailed me and said it came down to me and another guy. They went with the other guy. The hiring partner said they really liked me, that he hoped to work with me in the future, and that if they had any more work they'd give me a call. He said to give him a call because he wanted to talk to me about how I could improve my interview.

So when I call him, he immediately says I needed a new reference. He refused to get specific with what was said, but he told me one of my reference was not good and really detracted from my candidacy. I asked him which reference it was, and he wouldn't tell me who it was, just someone at a firm I had worked for. Right then I knew it was OFHP, because he was the only reference from a firm I had listed. I couldn't believe I got stabbed in the back. Why lie to someone and tell them you will give them a good reference when you clearly won't? I went to lunch with some attorneys in town right afterward and ended up breaking down crying in front of one of them in the parking lot. I was just so hurt and angry about what went down. The only law firm interview I had managed to wrangle in 4 months, down the tubes.

I really appreciated what that hiring partner did for me when he didn't have to. I never spoke to OFHP again, but I really hope what goes around comes around.

09042014
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby 09042014 » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:15 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
NYstate wrote:Regarding recommendations- be careful trusting the hiring partner. They will be asked why their firm didn't hire you. To protect themselves and their firm, they will almost inevitably come up with some negatives. They are never going to say that they have budget issues and they don't want to look like fools for not hiring you in the first place.

If you have other options for recommendations particularly a partner in a specific practice group, maybe try them first.


+ fucking 1

I think I may be the person OP is referring to when he (she?) said "I remember reading at least one story in the Vale where a hiring partner told a person he would give a favorable recommendation, then later gave a less than favorable one."

Story:

After I got the no offer call, they told me it wasn't my fault, and the hiring partner said he'd be more than happy to recommend me to others. Cool. So I get an interview with this midlaw firm I really like in an area I like. I do the phone screener and get the CB the next day. This is my only firm CB in the fall. They want some references, so I ask old firm hiring partner (OFHP) to be one, and OFHP is nice enough to even ask around his firm for me for any inside details about my interview. At this point I am down in the dumps and again, this is my only firm interview. I'm glad to have a good reference from my firm on my side.

So I get down there and I just KILL the interview. By this point I know a good interview when I see one. Everyone really likes me, and they even organize an impromptu meet and greet at a bar for me. These people were seriously awesome. Didn't even ask what happened to me this summer. Some people around town I know even called these guys on my behalf. At this point my self worth was still pretty tied to whether I could get a job, so I was feelin good.

I kept waiting for the decision. They tell me in November it's between me and two other people. It's cool, don't panic, prepare yourself for disappointment just in case. And then it came. The firm hiring partner emailed me and said it came down to me and another guy. They went with the other guy. The hiring partner said they really liked me, that he hoped to work with me in the future, and that if they had any more work they'd give me a call. He said to give him a call because he wanted to talk to me about how I could improve my interview.

So when I call him, he immediately says I needed a new reference. He refused to get specific with what was said, but he told me one of my reference was not good and really detracted from my candidacy. I asked him which reference it was, and he wouldn't tell me who it was, just someone at a firm I had worked for. Right then I knew it was OFHP, because he was the only reference from a firm I had listed. I couldn't believe I got stabbed in the back. Why lie to someone and tell them you will give them a good reference when you clearly won't? I went to lunch with some attorneys in town right afterward and ended up breaking down crying in front of one of them in the parking lot. I was just so hurt and angry about what went down. The only law firm interview I had managed to wrangle in 4 months, down the tubes.

I really appreciated what that hiring partner did for me when he didn't have to. I never spoke to OFHP again, but I really hope what goes around comes around.


That is just fucking terrible. Seduce his wife.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273359
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:16 pm

Desert Fox wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:+1 to everything said previously.

I was also no-offered last summer. I hope you all enjoy my story as well:

A few weeks before heading to the first firm I discovered I had epilepsy and had seizures all of the time. I went on meds, which jacked me up-- this made me have periods of high efficiency followed by periods where I would freeze up/ blank out/ have seizures. I did not tell my summer firm what was going on. In my first week at my firm some 3rd year associate who looked like Ryan Seacrest ("Seacrest Bro") assigned me a bunch of extra diligence work. He also started talking mad crap about how much he hated his job-- I was like his outlet. I spent an extra 40 hours that week and the next doing his work in addition to the other work I had been given. I topped out at 70 or 80-something hours with tons of extra work to do. This caused other attorneys to think I was lazy because it was taking so long for work to be done. I told Seacrest bro that I had to get some other work done for another attorney, and he told the hiring partner I had a bad attitude.

From this experience, the hiring partner felt it was necessary to begin meeting with me weekly to discuss my problem attitude. It was seriously like a scene from office space-- I had no idea what I did wrong but people kept meeting with me. Things started going pretty well again, I had turned in good work and was getting good reviews. I had a few assignments due on this one day before we had to leave for a retreat. I had enough time to finish and felt like this was a turning point for me. However, once again, the Seacrest bro dumped some extra work on me that morning as a chance to redeem myself for wanting to get off of his project. I was basically faced with an unwinnable decision: 1) get labeled as lazy for not turning in the assignments I had already been assigned by these other attorneys, or 2) get labeled again as having "a bad attitude" for not helping Seacrest bro at the last minute.

Anyways, long story short, I did the extra work last minute, got labeled as having a bad attitude by Seacrest anyway, and got labeled as lazy by the other attorneys for having delayed my work while on this retreat. I did get a nice firm jacket on the retreat though. When I got back, the hiring team kept meeting with me, I started having seizures at work-- one attorney was ever like "what is wrong with you?? Are you even listening to me!?" as I had a seizure. The hiring partner gave me an evaluation in my office-- I had a seizure then too. The depressing part is that I missed most of his speech and was tweaking out, but he didn't even notice and then wanted me to tell him what was wrong with me as an attorney.

I stayed later than the rest of the summers, worked harder, but knew that it was over for me. It was easiest to tell it was over when the hiring team stopped checking in, and one of the summers felt the need to become my boss on assignments we were working on together because she had heard through the grapevine that I was a problem. She made errors, blamed them on me, I spend 8 hrs correcting the errors, and then she cried to the hiring team that I had made the errors (and then came to me in private and said "I'm so sorry for blaming you, are we good??"). They believed it, why wouldn't they? Its easy to have one scapegoat instead of two.

I made some good friends while at work-- like 5 or 6 attorneys, including a few partners. They knew I was getting screwed and we all just kicked back and joked about it for the last two or three weeks of the summer. They thought it was crazy what had happened, but helped me cope. I think this is what kept me sane-- they validated that I wasn't sucky, gave me pimp assignments, and we ate lunch at great places pretty much every day. They also made fun of how stupid the feedback I was getting was. Got no-offered over the phone by the hiring partner a few weeks later.

Anyway, I went to my second firm. Did my best. Stayed late every night. Even brought a few clients in. Was given a verbal offer on the last day of work. I got a call in December from the hiring partner saying "just wait, we will get back to you, having some issues." I didn't find out until February that the firm had split into three firms, and hiring partner had left for a different firm. One of the new firms that had formed said they wanted to hire me. I drove 2300 miles across the country to interview with them. Was forced off the freeway by a jerk semi truck during a winter storm and almost rolled my SUV with my newborn baby in the car on the way there. Couldn't afford new brakes or tires-- and maxed out my credit cards for this sure offer (I mean if the former firm offered you, the spin-off would right?) We were lucky not to crash down an embankment or roll. Spent over $1000 of my own money to get out to this interview. They made it sound like they were going to give me the job. I held off on a few other jobs because of this. They sent me a form rejection email with no explanation the day after I had brainstormed with the hiring partner regarding potential start dates. I wanted to cry, but remained hopeful.

On the way back from the interview I was going into Costco in a random flyover state-- I was freezing and forgot my jacket. I looked around in the car and spotted the warm jacket I got at the first firm's retreat under a seat. I had a bad gut feeling not to wear the jacked to Costco, and just buy a Volcom hoodie or something instead-- I thought "why would it matter, you are in the middle of nowhere." As I am checking out, the wife of one of the summers who got an offer at the firm comes walking up to me. She said "aren't you excited that you and my husband are going to be working together at the firm?!" I explained to her that I was going to be working somewhere else-- she then gave me this blank stare, looked at my jacket, and had this expression like "you just couldn't let go of the firm could you loser") Now, I am not only the summer who got no-offered, but some weird stalker guy who wears a jacket the firm gave me after getting no offered.


This is some 180 creative writing.


Anon from before. I'm not trolling--this is 100% what happened.

rad lulz
Posts: 9844
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:53 pm

Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby rad lulz » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:18 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Anon from before. I'm not trolling--this is 100% what happened.

Probably not trolling

I remember someone had poasted ab a seizure no offer before here

It's an unlikely long troll

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Broseidon
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Re: Guide to Getting No Offered / No Offer Support thread

Postby Broseidon » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:34 pm

jeeptiger09 wrote:Great thread, great advice. Just stopped in to say that if you are fortunate enough to get an offer, don't be that asshole who constantly posts on every social media outlet about your offer or your constant firm-world problems. There are enough assholes in law/school.

Not a ton of people get biglaw SAs at my school but sure enough, the ones that did rushed to make it their FB employment. I'm happy for them but it's poor taste IMO, especially when they know damn well they're in the lucky minority here.




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