Business and Golf

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crazycanuck
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Business and Golf

Postby crazycanuck » Fri Jul 17, 2009 12:57 pm

Hey everyone, I'm terrible with grammar so if someone wants to proofread this that would be awesome! Also if anyone has anything that they would like to see added let me know!

Business and Golf

The sport of golf is closely correlated with ”big business” and is one of the most effective and important tools for networking and deal making in the modern business world. Golf is played by millions of people worldwide. According to Barrons (March 30, 1998) cover story ”Invest in Golf”, one quarter of the 25 million golfers in the U.S are top management exectuives and an estimated 90% of Fortune 500 CEO’s play golf. Eighty percent of these executives agree that golf is an important business and networking tool. Do not allow yourself to miss out on the unique networking opportunity that golf provides. Whether you are an amateur golfer who plays once a year, or a professional, golf provides networking and career opportunites that ”hard work” will not provide; an opportunity to interact with employers. You do not want to be the associate left behind at the office as a partner takes someone else who plays golf to meet important clients.

Golf not only provides great networking opportunities, but it is also used by employers to meet a future employee or client and watch how the employee or client act under pressure. Any future lawyer or businessperson needs to be prepared for the challenges of a golf course and be able to act on the course with grace, confidence and integrity.

Prior to leaving your house for a round of golf you need to…
1. Get a good nights rest.
2. Eat a hearty breakfast
3. Read the paper in the morning. All of it. The talk on the course will not be all business all the time. Your playing partners will talk about everything and you need to be prepared to and able to engage them in any topic that comes up. There is a very good chance that local gossip will arise and you need to be ready.
4. Be aware of any current professional golf tournaments, who is winning and who is not. Professional golf will be discussed and you need to be able to join in the conversation.

When you get to the golf course…
1. Arrive early and warm up. Like any sport if you are not properly warmed up you risk the chance of injury. Go the driving range and hit a few balls. A small bucket of 40 balls is usually a good warm up.
2. Practice on the putting green for at least 15 minutes. This will give you a feel for how ”fast” the greens are.
3. Most courses have a course map on the score cards. Go over this map in the pro shop and if you have any questions about the course ask the pros. If there are creeks ask the pros how far the creeks are from the tee box. You will be prepared on the golf course and it will impress your playing partners.

When you are on the golf course…

1. Always, always, ALWAYS follow proper golf course ettiquette.

Golf Course Ettiquette

1. Adhere strictly to the dress code. The night before you go to play check the course website, it will specify what is appropriate and what is not. If in doubt, wear a collared shirt and khakis. NEVER wear jeans.
a. For men, appropriate golf attire consists of shirts, slacks or tailored shorts and appropriate shoes (i.e. soft-spike or non-spiked). Shirts must have collars and sleeves and should be tucked in at the waist. Shorts must be tailored dress shorts that are no shorter than mid-thigh. Men should never wear skirts.
b. For women, appropriate golf attire consists of skirts, slacks or tailored shorts, shirts or blouses and appropriate shoes (i.e. soft-spike or non-spiked). Shirts and blouses should have collars and/or sleeves and should be tucked in at the waist. Shorts should be tailored dress shorts that are no less that mid-thigh in length. Skirts and/or shorts must also be at least mid-thigh in length.

The following are not acceptable attire on any golf course or in any clubhouse: rugby pants, cut-offs, athletic shorts, surfer shorts, sweat pants, tank tops, undershirts worn as outerwear, athletic and team jerseys, or any item of clothing with large cartoon graphics or commercial logos.

2. Language
a. Never, ever, swear on the golf course. If your playing partner is swearing to high heaven do not assume it is ok for you to join in the swearing.
b. Similiary, never throw a club. Throwing a club can be a two shot penalty and is frowned upon by players. If you are feeling frustrated breath deeply and close your eyes for a few moments.

3. Tee Box Ettiquette
a. The tee box is the area of the golf course where the golfers hit their first shot from. There are different colored markers placed on the boxes and you may tee off anywhere between the colored markers. The markers show the different skill levels required. The most forward markers are the childrens tees, followed by the senior and womens tees, followed by the intermediate tees and last is the professional tees.
b. The person who scored the lowest on the previous hole hits first.
c. Be totally silent and still when others are hitting.
d. Watch out for your shadow.
e. Stand in an area that allows you to be directly visible by the person hitting the ball.
f. Always follow your own ball flight to a conclusion and have a marker, like a tree, pointed out to make it easier to find your ball.
g. Clean the area of your broken tee and replace divots.

4. Fairway Ettiquette
a. Although the rules of golf stipulate a five minute allowance for finding a ball, do not use all five minutes. If after a minute or two you are unable to find your ball declare a lost ball, drop a new one and play that ball.
b. Whoever is furthest from the hole, hits first. This true from any position on the golf course except for the tee box.
c. Do not take any additional divots on practice swings. If everyone took three divots, there wouldn’t be any grass on the fairways.
d. Always replace your divot. Carts usually come equipped with a box of dirt and seeds to fill in the hole. You can also pick up the slice of grass and replace it in its slot.

5. Green Ettiquette
a. Do not remove the flag stick until everyone’s ball is on the green.
b. Remove and place the flag stick gently on the ground, on the fringe of the green, to avoid damaging the sensitive grass on the green.
c. If a player requests to have the flag stick in when they make their putt, make sure you hold the stick and flag down so the wind does move the flag. Also make sure that your shadow does not cross their putting line or the hole. Remove the flag from the hole shortly after the putt is hit.
d. Be aware of where you are walking. Do not walk on, or near someone’s putting line to the hole. Walk around their ball to get to your destination.
e. Do not jump on the green as this can cause extra damage to the sensitive grass. (Fist pumps however are allowed)
f. Always repair your ball mark. This can be done with a ball mark repair tool or a simple tee. Here is a short video on how to properly repair your ball mark on the green.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-ZzT8yMnmg

The Rules of Golf

The Rules of golf are many and complex. Be familiar with the basic rules before you head out to the golf course. The USGA provides a website with many updated rulings.
http://www.usga.org/Rules.aspx?id=7788#show=7868
For the more serious golfer, keeping a small rulebook in your bag is recommended so it can be pulled out and consulted whenever necessary.

Terminology

Chip- A chip is a short shot from just off the green.
Putt – A putt is a shot on the green using the putter.
Eagle – 2 shots under par for the hole
Birdie – 1 shot under par for the hole
Par – The amount of shots it should take you to get on the green plus two putts. A par three should take you one shot to get on the green and two putts. A par four takes two shots to get on the green and two putts, and a par five takes three shots to get on the green and two putts. Par is also the par of all holes added up in one final par for the course. On a full course Par ranges from 70-73 typically.
Bogie – 1 shot over par for the hole
Double Bogie – 2 shots over par for the hole
Cut - a type of controlled golf shot in which a golfer induces a fade ball flight. For a right-handed golfer, that means the ball moves from left-to-right in flight; for left-handers, the ball moves from right-to-left.
Fade - describes a trajectory or ball flight in which the golf ball comes off the clubface moving to the left of the target before curving gently back to the right (for a right-handed golfer; reverse directions for a left-hander).
Draw – Describes a trajectory or ball flight in which the golf ball comes off the clubface moving to the right of the target before curving gently back to the left (for a right-handed golfer; reverse directions for a left-hander) .
Slice – Describes a trajectory or ball flight in which the golf ball comes off the clubface moving towards the target before peeling off far right (For a right-handed golfer; reverse directions for a left hander).
Hook – Describes a trajectory or ball flight in which the golf ball comes off the clubface toward the target before peeling off hard left (For a right-handed golfer; reverse directions for a left hander).
Fat – Refers to the instance where the golf club hits the ground before it hits the golf ball. Results in a short awkward shot.
Thin – Refers to the instance where the blade of the golf club hits the golf ball only and does not hit the ground. Result in a low flying ”bullet” ball. Distance and spin are unpredictable.
Handicapp - A numerical measure of an amateur golfer's playing ability based on the tees played for a given course. It is used to calculate a net score from the number of strokes actually played, thus allowing players of different proficiency to play against each other on somewhat equal terms. The higher the handicap of a player, the poorer the player is relative to those with lower handicaps. Handicaps are administered by golf clubs or national golf associations. Exact rules relating to handicaps can vary from country to country.
Scratch – A golfer with a handicapp of 0
Rating - A number generally between 67 and 77 that is used to measure the average "good score" by a scratch golfer on that course
Slope rating - the USGA mark that indicates the measurement of the relative difficulty for a bogey golfer compared to the course rating. Slope rating is computed from the difference between the bogey rating and the course rating. The lowest slope rating is 55 and the highest is 155. The average slope rating is 113.
Yardage – How many yards long the course is measure from the respective tee boxes to the front of each green.

Equipment

Golf clubs is a very personal choice that the golfer must make. The best option when buying a set of clubs is to go to your local golf shop and trying hitting a few different sets of clubs. All golf shops have an area allocated for hitting golf balls and are usually places in large nets. Golf Town in Canada, and Golf Galaxy in the U.S.A has state of the art screens that you hit the golf ball into. It measures the speed, spin and distance accurate to about five yards. It’s almost like being at a real driving range. A professional golf club fitting is usually free and will benefit most golfers.
Every year the popular golfing magazine Golf Digest creates a ”Hot List” of the clubs that they feel are the best. This list will help narrow down your choices. A new or average player should choose either the ”super game imrovement” or the ”game improvement clubs”. A more advanced golfer should choose the ”players” clubs.
http://www.golfdigest.com/
A player is allowed a maximum of fourteen clubs in the bag with no minimum amount. Borrowing a club from another player is not permitted in tournament play.

Summary

Most top business executives play golf and it is a powerful and fun networking tool for all lawyers and businesspeople. It will provide you with an ”in” with the big boys and with some great exercise! When on the golf course, make sure you adhere strictly to the proper etiquette on the tee boxes, the fairways and the greens. Familiarize yourself with the rules and equipment and enjoy the game!

Quick Links

http://www.golfdigest.com/
http://www.usga.org/
http://www.pga.com/home/
http://www.rcga.org/
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Last edited by crazycanuck on Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:36 pm, edited 2 times in total.

FeuerFrei
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby FeuerFrei » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:28 pm

.
Last edited by FeuerFrei on Sun Feb 06, 2011 5:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Boyk1182
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Boyk1182 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:32 pm

No cussing on the golf course..? hmmmm, is throwing clubs ok??

edit: Just saw that it's not :shock:
Last edited by Boyk1182 on Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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pleasetryagain
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby pleasetryagain » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:32 pm

I wish I had time to gold these days. id probably shoot a 115-125 right now.. (from my all time low of 95 :oops: )

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Aeroplane
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Aeroplane » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:34 pm

Great post. I am terrible at golf but it is so much fun.

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crazycanuck
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby crazycanuck » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:34 pm

I'm getting ready to head out to the course in half an hour... :oops:

deadatheist
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby deadatheist » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:08 pm

Not bad. I'm on my phone (on a golf course in fact) so can't really quote and help you with grammar. But a few thoughts:

The "all of the newspaper" thing is kind of weak.

Suggest to your reader knowing restaurants within the area, should your group want to grab a bite/drink afterward.

Mention pace of play maybe: sometimes courses can be backed up and proper consideration for the people in front and behind you must be made

If you're looking to impress your company, I suggest if there's a bev cart on the course, offer to buy your group a round, and give the cart attendant a nice tip... this I think will impress people who frequent golf courses as its polite and much appreciated when its hot. You should also offer to buy lunch/drinks if someone else bought the round of golf.

If you are buying drinks, don't get drunk :)

Bring sunscreen.

Ill let you know if I think of anything else

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Aeroplane
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Aeroplane » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:11 pm

I'd like to add: women should not be scared of golf. Way too many women are reluctant to try it, and even those who have played before are hesitant about playing with male coworkers at company events. You can build up your confidence by taking a few intro lessons (group rates are cheap if you can find a few friends to do it with you) and hitting balls at the driving range.

Edit: has anyone mentioned bug spray yet? Bugs can be brutal.

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Who32
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Who32 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:26 pm

Maybe mention that you should'nt pee in the woods.

And how about some cart ettiquette:

Drive straight across the fairways instead of zig-zagging all over the place.
Never drive on the green.


Also, make sure you have a lot of balls and tees in case you lose. And don't be afraid to give some away. I always like if I lose a ball and someone else I'm playing with just tosses me one for another shot.

Oh yeah, and DONT CHEAT!!!

deadatheist
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby deadatheist » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:29 pm

Zomg, I originally intended to mention don't pee on the course, how could I forget the most important thing?

Seriously guys, its gross.

Leeroy Jenkins
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Leeroy Jenkins » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:30 pm

why not sleeveless collared shirt, like a polo?

^ If its good enough for Tiger Woods, why is wearing one be a no-no?

Imo sleeves can get in the way of swinging. Some of my shirts are kinda tight around my shoulders.

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Who32
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Who32 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:33 pm

Another...If you smoke, don't leave the buts on the grass. Throw them out. And just a tip if you are smoking...It's a bad idea to leave it in the grass while you take a shot. The pesticides from the course get all over the cig and its just not a good idea.

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crazycanuck
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby crazycanuck » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:45 pm

deadatheist wrote:Not bad. I'm on my phone (on a golf course in fact) so can't really quote and help you with grammar. But a few thoughts:

The "all of the newspaper" thing is kind of weak.

Suggest to your reader knowing restaurants within the area, should your group want to grab a bite/drink afterward.

Mention pace of play maybe: sometimes courses can be backed up and proper consideration for the people in front and behind you must be made

If you're looking to impress your company, I suggest if there's a bev cart on the course, offer to buy your group a round, and give the cart attendant a nice tip... this I think will impress people who frequent golf courses as its polite and much appreciated when its hot. You should also offer to buy lunch/drinks if someone else bought the round of golf.

If you are buying drinks, don't get drunk :)

Bring sunscreen.

Ill let you know if I think of anything else


I like these suggestions, I'll work it in to a paragraph tonight. You'd be surprised how much the newpaper thing does matter. I play golf with a big time CEO every couple of weeks, and one of the tips he gave me was to make sure that I always read the paper before going to the golf course. You need to be prepared for any conversation that comes up. It probably won't help, but if a local story comes up in conversation and you don't know anything about it, you will feel like an outsider.

Aeroplane wrote:I'd like to add: women should not be scared of golf. Way too many women are reluctant to try it, and even those who have played before are hesitant about playing with male coworkers at company events. You can build up your confidence by taking a few intro lessons (group rates are cheap if you can find a few friends to do it with you) and hitting balls at the driving range.

Edit: has anyone mentioned bug spray yet? Bugs can be brutal.
.

Another great point that I will work into a short paragraph. If there is a female golfer around, if they want to write an article (or a paragraph) on womens golfing with the boys that would probably be a great addition or another article.

I will add in some golf cart etiquette and peeing in the words stuff tonight too.

Lxw wrote:why not sleeveless collared shirt, like a polo?

^ If its good enough for Tiger Woods, why is wearing one be a no-no?

Imo sleeves can get in the way of swinging. Some of my shirts are kinda tight around my shoulders.


Don't try to set a fashion statement when going out with the company/clients. Tiger could show up to most golf courses naked and would be allowed to play. Just stick to the collared shirts. The fabric for golf shirts is usually very light and doesn't get in the way of your swing. I should probably add in a sentence about not popping the collar. I am seeing that more and more and it pisses me off.

Who32 wrote:Another...If you smoke, don't leave the buts on the grass. Throw them out. And just a tip if you are smoking...It's a bad idea to leave it in the grass while you take a shot. The pesticides from the course get all over the cig and its just not a good idea.


I would suggest not smoking at all on the golf course unless everyone else is smoking. I should probably add that in too.

Looks like I have a lot to do this evening.

Edit: Boo Tiger didn't make the cut in the British Open.

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Who32
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Who32 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 3:09 pm

I was speaking more towards cigars, which I consider pretty acceptable. I've never been on a business golf outing but would think that cigars are smoked pretty often.

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Dingo McPhee
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Dingo McPhee » Fri Jul 17, 2009 4:15 pm

Lxw wrote:why not sleeveless collared shirt, like a polo?

I think you're misusing the word "sleeveless". Do you mean short sleeves?

Short sleeves is this:
Image

Sleeveless is this:
--ImageRemoved--

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crazycanuck
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby crazycanuck » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:24 pm

Who32 wrote:I was speaking more towards cigars, which I consider pretty acceptable. I've never been on a business golf outing but would think that cigars are smoked pretty often.


Cigars are acceptable if you are with your buddies, but don't be the first one to light up a cigar. If the boss lights up a cigar, he will likely offer you one. Smoke it and on the back nine offer him one of yours. Some people don't mind cigar smoke, it can drive others crazy.

Golf can be very touchy and it is always better to ere on the side of caution/conservatism when on a formal business golf outing.

Don't be fooled by the relaxed atmosphere of a golf course. I've had interviews on the golf course (even though it wasn't a formal interview, think of it like an OCI dinner), would you find it acceptable to light a cigar during an interview?

Slimpee
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Slimpee » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:33 pm

Don't wear jeanshorts.

Don't wear tanktops.

Pretty much don't wear anything you'd see at a Whitesnake concert.

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Carnertine
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Carnertine » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:38 pm

Who32 wrote:Never drive on the green


So I have to walk up to it?

Leeroy Jenkins
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Leeroy Jenkins » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:53 pm

Carnertine wrote:
Who32 wrote:Never drive on the green

So I have to walk up to it?

...

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Carnertine
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Carnertine » Sat Jul 18, 2009 5:50 pm

betasteve wrote:Remember that if you fail to hit your tee shot past the ladies tee, golf etiquette requires you to play the remainder of the hole with your pants at your ankles.


If this rule were strictly enforced, I would be playing that way at least 1 hole everytime.

Leeroy Jenkins
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Leeroy Jenkins » Sat Jul 18, 2009 7:08 pm

Carnertine wrote:If this rule were strictly enforced, I would be playing that way at least 1 hole everytime.

When you're shamed, you deserve to be shamed.

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BeastCoastHype
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby BeastCoastHype » Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:13 pm

I think this is a very good personal statement. Good luck!

EDIT: Oh yeah, also never, ever set your bag on the green. And use the rake after you hit out of the sand trap.

2nd EDIT: Also, when you approach the putting green, put your bag in a place that will be convenient to pick up on your way to the next hole. You look like an idiot if you have to run around the green while everyone else takes off in a straight line.

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pleasetryagain
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby pleasetryagain » Sat Jul 18, 2009 10:04 pm

betasteve wrote:Also, you don't need 3+ full practice swings before you hit. This isn't a tournament and you aren't on the PGA tour. Don't make me fucking wait for you.


+1

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pu_golf88
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby pu_golf88 » Sat Jul 18, 2009 10:52 pm

Throwing your club isn't a 2 stroke penalty...

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Splitt3r
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Re: Business and Golf

Postby Splitt3r » Sat Jul 18, 2009 11:13 pm

pu_golf88 wrote:Throwing your club isn't a 2 stroke penalty...


Depends in what context you're playing. It is in high school and (I'm pretty sure) NCAA. It's not part of the USGA rules though, so it's not something you'd run into in a business setting.

betasteve wrote:The caddy of the first person on the green is to tend the cup. If he doesn't, cane him with the flagstick.


Who plays with a caddy these days?




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