50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

(Applications Advice, Letters of Recommendation . . . )
duane13p
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2013 1:05 pm

50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby duane13p » Sun Dec 08, 2013 3:57 pm

After years as a college dropout and a couple of successful business startups, I went back to school and I will graduate in March with a bachelor's in business administration. I have always wanted to be a lawyer, and in a few years I will get there. Question is, what are my options?

I will graduate with a minimum 3.68 GPA (or possibly as high as 3.71, depending on how LSAC evaluates my transcripts). I took the LSAT in October on mind-numbing pain killers (broken ankle) and almost no prep, and I scored a disappointing 149. After getting my score I resolved to do better, so I studied furiously during the five weeks until a December retake, and I'm confident that I scored a 160 or slightly higher. I also know that I could do much better still if I were to continue prepping and retake once again in February, probably approaching or achieving a 170 score (I work full-time and I have three minor sons at home, so study time was somewhat limited for the December retake.)

Considering my age, it would not be sensible for me to take on a lot of debt, and neither would it make sense for me to pursue a top-tier school in hopes of a biglaw career that would never happen; however, it would make sense to try to get a free ride somewhere then go out and practice the kind of law I always dreamed of in a small, independent firm. I am a resident of Nevada, so UNLV is a reasonable choice, but I do not want to live in Nevada after graduation. Rather, I would live in most any other western state -- pretty much any west of the Great Divide, so a school in any of those states would also seem a reasonable choice, with U of Arizona, ASU, U of Utah, and BYU on my short list. I perceive the Utah schools as ones which draw students from all corners, so regionality is not as important a consideration as it may be with other non-top-tier schools.

So, questions, and I would love to read any and all insights (including the flames of how I should think about retirement, not law school, etc.):

1. Is 3.68 and 160 enough for serious scholarship consideration?

2. Would a February retake of the LSAT be too late for scholarship consideration, even if I bumped my score up to the 168-170 range? (I will not delay my apps to the next admissions cycle.)

3. I've inferred from reading some threads here that region is an important consideration for schools not in the top tier (i.e., one should seek employment in proximity to the school from which he graduates, where it is well-known.) Is this a reasonable inference?

Thanks.

Duane

User avatar
WaltGrace83
Posts: 719
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 5:55 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby WaltGrace83 » Sun Dec 08, 2013 6:08 pm

duane13p wrote:
I will graduate with a minimum 3.68 GPA (or possibly as high as 3.71, depending on how LSAC evaluates my transcripts). I took the LSAT in October on mind-numbing pain killers (broken ankle) and almost no prep, and I scored a disappointing 149. After getting my score I resolved to do better, so I studied furiously during the five weeks until a December retake, and I'm confident that I scored a 160 or slightly higher. I also know that I could do much better still if I were to continue prepping and retake once again in February, probably approaching or achieving a 170 score (I work full-time and I have three minor sons at home, so study time was somewhat limited for the December retake.)


You are going to need just about a full ride to make this make sense and, if what you say here is true, you should DEFINITELY retake and cop that 170+. It will do wonders for you but only retake when you are absolutely ready. You kind of half-assed it if you took it once without prep and twice with minimal prep. If this is what you want to do, go get it! Prep well and take when fully ready.

duane13p wrote:1. Is 3.68 and 160 enough for serious scholarship consideration?


Maybe at some schools, but not enough to make it a viable option

duane13p wrote:2. Would a February retake of the LSAT be too late for scholarship consideration, even if I bumped my score up to the 168-170 range? (I will not delay my apps to the next admissions cycle.)


Not necessarily from what I've read.

WHY NOT? You waited TWENTY FIVE years since graduating from college and now ONE MORE is too much? :?

duane13p wrote:3. I've inferred from reading some threads here that region is an important consideration for schools not in the top tier (i.e., one should seek employment in proximity to the school from which he graduates, where it is well-known.) Is this a reasonable inference?


Unless you have a lined up job, this really is true.

If you want to practice in a smaller, more regional market, TCR says to go to the best regional school with the best scholly.

Good luck!!!

User avatar
midwest17
Posts: 1686
Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2013 5:27 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby midwest17 » Sun Dec 08, 2013 6:11 pm

WaltGrace83 wrote:
duane13p wrote:2. Would a February retake of the LSAT be too late for scholarship consideration, even if I bumped my score up to the 168-170 range? (I will not delay my apps to the next admissions cycle.)


Not necessarily from what I've read.

WHY NOT? You waited TWENTY FIVE years since graduating from college and now ONE MORE is too much? :?


Well actually (s)he said (s)he's just now graduating from college. But the point remains the same.

OP, study for a real amount of time. Retake in June or October.

Think about it this way: if you try again with a half-assed amount of studying and get another score that won't generate enough scholarships to make this worthwhile, you'll have to sit out two cycles instead of one.

User avatar
WaltGrace83
Posts: 719
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 5:55 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby WaltGrace83 » Sun Dec 08, 2013 6:14 pm

midwest17 wrote:
WaltGrace83 wrote:
duane13p wrote:2. Would a February retake of the LSAT be too late for scholarship consideration, even if I bumped my score up to the 168-170 range? (I will not delay my apps to the next admissions cycle.)


Not necessarily from what I've read.

WHY NOT? You waited TWENTY FIVE years since graduating from college and now ONE MORE is too much? :?


Well actually (s)he said (s)he's just now graduating from college. But the point remains the same.

OP, study for a real amount of time. Retake in June or October.

Think about it this way: if you try again with a half-assed amount of studying and get another score that won't generate enough scholarships to make this worthwhile, you'll have to sit out two cycles instead of one.


Ah yes, RC fail. But seriously, I don't understand why many people don't maximize their retakes and don't wait until they are ready (coming from a 0L who hasn't taken the LSAT yet)

User avatar
Young Marino
Posts: 826
Joined: Fri Apr 26, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby Young Marino » Mon Dec 09, 2013 11:38 am

duane13p wrote:After years as a college dropout and a couple of successful business startups, I went back to school and I will graduate in March with a bachelor's in business administration. I have always wanted to be a lawyer, and in a few years I will get there. Question is, what are my options?

I will graduate with a minimum 3.68 GPA (or possibly as high as 3.71, depending on how LSAC evaluates my transcripts). I took the LSAT in October on mind-numbing pain killers (broken ankle) and almost no prep, and I scored a disappointing 149. After getting my score I resolved to do better, so I studied furiously during the five weeks until a December retake, and I'm confident that I scored a 160 or slightly higher. I also know that I could do much better still if I were to continue prepping and retake once again in February, probably approaching or achieving a 170 score (I work full-time and I have three minor sons at home, so study time was somewhat limited for the December retake.)

Considering my age, it would not be sensible for me to take on a lot of debt, and neither would it make sense for me to pursue a top-tier school in hopes of a biglaw career that would never happen; however, it would make sense to try to get a free ride somewhere then go out and practice the kind of law I always dreamed of in a small, independent firm. I am a resident of Nevada, so UNLV is a reasonable choice, but I do not want to live in Nevada after graduation. Rather, I would live in most any other western state -- pretty much any west of the Great Divide, so a school in any of those states would also seem a reasonable choice, with U of Arizona, ASU, U of Utah, and BYU on my short list. I perceive the Utah schools as ones which draw students from all corners, so regionality is not as important a consideration as it may be with other non-top-tier schools.

So, questions, and I would love to read any and all insights (including the flames of how I should think about retirement, not law school, etc.):

1. Is 3.68 and 160 enough for serious scholarship consideration?

2. Would a February retake of the LSAT be too late for scholarship consideration, even if I bumped my score up to the 168-170 range? (I will not delay my apps to the next admissions cycle.)

3. I've inferred from reading some threads here that region is an important consideration for schools not in the top tier (i.e., one should seek employment in proximity to the school from which he graduates, where it is well-known.) Is this a reasonable inference?

Thanks.

Duane

OP, if you really don't want to retake, look at lawschoolnumbers.com to see if anyone with similar stats got $$ at the schools you're looking at. Also, you may want to look at lawschooltransparency.com and see how well those schools place. Generally, if you are above both 75th percentiles in gpa and lsat, you probably have a good shot at landing close to a full ride at any of these schools but be wary of stipulations. ASU, BYU, UA are probably not going to give you significant scholly money.

User avatar
bound
Posts: 1083
Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2013 4:49 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby bound » Mon Dec 09, 2013 1:52 pm

Young Marino wrote:
duane13p wrote:After years as a college dropout and a couple of successful business startups, I went back to school and I will graduate in March with a bachelor's in business administration. I have always wanted to be a lawyer, and in a few years I will get there. Question is, what are my options?

I will graduate with a minimum 3.68 GPA (or possibly as high as 3.71, depending on how LSAC evaluates my transcripts). I took the LSAT in October on mind-numbing pain killers (broken ankle) and almost no prep, and I scored a disappointing 149. After getting my score I resolved to do better, so I studied furiously during the five weeks until a December retake, and I'm confident that I scored a 160 or slightly higher. I also know that I could do much better still if I were to continue prepping and retake once again in February, probably approaching or achieving a 170 score (I work full-time and I have three minor sons at home, so study time was somewhat limited for the December retake.)

Considering my age, it would not be sensible for me to take on a lot of debt, and neither would it make sense for me to pursue a top-tier school in hopes of a biglaw career that would never happen; however, it would make sense to try to get a free ride somewhere then go out and practice the kind of law I always dreamed of in a small, independent firm. I am a resident of Nevada, so UNLV is a reasonable choice, but I do not want to live in Nevada after graduation. Rather, I would live in most any other western state -- pretty much any west of the Great Divide, so a school in any of those states would also seem a reasonable choice, with U of Arizona, ASU, U of Utah, and BYU on my short list. I perceive the Utah schools as ones which draw students from all corners, so regionality is not as important a consideration as it may be with other non-top-tier schools.

So, questions, and I would love to read any and all insights (including the flames of how I should think about retirement, not law school, etc.):

1. Is 3.68 and 160 enough for serious scholarship consideration?

2. Would a February retake of the LSAT be too late for scholarship consideration, even if I bumped my score up to the 168-170 range? (I will not delay my apps to the next admissions cycle.)

3. I've inferred from reading some threads here that region is an important consideration for schools not in the top tier (i.e., one should seek employment in proximity to the school from which he graduates, where it is well-known.) Is this a reasonable inference?

Thanks.

Duane

OP, if you really don't want to retake, look at lawschoolnumbers.com to see if anyone with similar stats got $$ at the schools you're looking at. Also, you may want to look at lawschooltransparency.com and see how well those schools place. Generally, if you are above both 75th percentiles in gpa and lsat, you probably have a good shot at landing close to a full ride at any of these schools but be wary of stipulations. ASU, BYU, UA are probably not going to give you significant scholly money.



Not necessarily true. My friend had a 3.7x, 155 LSAT (only taken once), double major in Finance and Entrepreneurship, and received over 50% from UofA. She is now a 1L there. I'm not sure what you consider as significant, but I would say over 50% with those kinds of a numbers is rather significant.


***Disclaimer: she IS an Arizona resident, so her tuition is next to nothing now. I don't know what state you reside in OP, but that should be a huge factor in determining your school...

HYSenberg
Posts: 265
Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:10 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby HYSenberg » Mon Dec 09, 2013 1:57 pm

I know you don't want to stay in NV, but you'd probably get a sizable scholarship at UNLV.

User avatar
iamgeorgebush
Posts: 851
Joined: Sat Oct 05, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby iamgeorgebush » Tue Dec 10, 2013 12:14 am

OP: You've just graduated with a bachelors of business administration, and you've founded a couple of successful business startups. Think about this as a business investment. Here are the data from which you should draw conclusions on how to invest: http://www.lstscorereports.com
Last edited by iamgeorgebush on Tue Dec 10, 2013 12:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Nova
Posts: 9116
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:55 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby Nova » Tue Dec 10, 2013 12:16 am

Youll get good money from schools where you are at or above their medians. Unfortunately there will almost certainly be strings attached

User avatar
ph14
Posts: 3225
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 11:15 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby ph14 » Tue Dec 10, 2013 1:24 am

duane13p wrote:After years as a college dropout and a couple of successful business startups, I went back to school and I will graduate in March with a bachelor's in business administration. I have always wanted to be a lawyer, and in a few years I will get there. Question is, what are my options?

I will graduate with a minimum 3.68 GPA (or possibly as high as 3.71, depending on how LSAC evaluates my transcripts). I took the LSAT in October on mind-numbing pain killers (broken ankle) and almost no prep, and I scored a disappointing 149. After getting my score I resolved to do better, so I studied furiously during the five weeks until a December retake, and I'm confident that I scored a 160 or slightly higher. I also know that I could do much better still if I were to continue prepping and retake once again in February, probably approaching or achieving a 170 score (I work full-time and I have three minor sons at home, so study time was somewhat limited for the December retake.)

Considering my age, it would not be sensible for me to take on a lot of debt, and neither would it make sense for me to pursue a top-tier school in hopes of a biglaw career that would never happen; however, it would make sense to try to get a free ride somewhere then go out and practice the kind of law I always dreamed of in a small, independent firm. I am a resident of Nevada, so UNLV is a reasonable choice, but I do not want to live in Nevada after graduation. Rather, I would live in most any other western state -- pretty much any west of the Great Divide, so a school in any of those states would also seem a reasonable choice, with U of Arizona, ASU, U of Utah, and BYU on my short list. I perceive the Utah schools as ones which draw students from all corners, so regionality is not as important a consideration as it may be with other non-top-tier schools.

So, questions, and I would love to read any and all insights (including the flames of how I should think about retirement, not law school, etc.):

1. Is 3.68 and 160 enough for serious scholarship consideration?

2. Would a February retake of the LSAT be too late for scholarship consideration, even if I bumped my score up to the 168-170 range? (I will not delay my apps to the next admissions cycle.)

3. I've inferred from reading some threads here that region is an important consideration for schools not in the top tier (i.e., one should seek employment in proximity to the school from which he graduates, where it is well-known.) Is this a reasonable inference?

Thanks.

Duane


First off, good for you. It's really impressive you have the motivation to go back to school and pursue a law degree, especially when you are older than most students and have three kids. In response to your question:

1. Maybe, check out lawschoolnumbers. Someone will likely give you some scholarship consideration, it's just a question of whether it is a school you would/should want to attend.
2. Probably not, but schools do have rolling scholarships and limited funds often, so it might hurt you that you are applying when a lot of the year's scholarship money has been spent. But if you have a great LSAT score then you can probably get some. You should consider delaying your apps, as you would certainly be guaranteed a huge scholarship if you can score a 170+.
3. Yes, absolutely.

Best of luck.

duane13p
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2013 1:05 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby duane13p » Tue Dec 10, 2013 1:32 am

Thank you all for your thoughtful replies and good advice. I also got a nice pm from someone who was concerned that her post here would encourage flames.

I am old to start a career in law, I know; but in three years I’ll be the same age with or without the J.D., and since I’m just starting out with the B.A. behind my name I am still starting out, either way. I sold my last business about five years ago, and I currently work a menial job earning less than $40k, mainly for the health insurance and a bit of income while I finish school (I live in a very isolated, small town in northwest Nevada, so relocation is necessary even if I choose UNLV.) If I can keep law school expenses to a minimum, it should pay off financially – and it will pay off in other ways, not least of which is satisfying a life-long desire.

In the pm, the sender suggested that my age will make it difficult for me to hire on at most any firm, and thus I should consider venturing solo. (Does this sound realistic?) If I were to go solo, my school’s reputation/rank would not be at all relevant. I plan to pursue personal injury and the associated medical malpractice (though I would never chase an ambulance, which is not my style; legitimate p.i. and, especially, malpractice, is what I’m after), so going solo is a practical option, though I would prefer to work in some firm for at least a bit to establish myself.

I will heed the consensus advice and not retake the LSAT (if I ever do) until I am assuredly prepared sufficiently to break the 170 barrier, which I probably cannot do by February. I will see what this admissions cycle brings, and retake in June or October if need be. Some schools now even have rolling admissions, so a January start is possible.

I will look at the sites mentioned in one of the replies, and I will consider the medians at the schools to which I may apply. I also agree that as a Nevada resident, UNLV might be my best bet for a tuition break. For a relatively new school (Boyd was founded in 1997) it is very respectably ranked 68th. And since I would like to stay West, Southwest particularly, this might be a nice regional choice.

I will incur living expenses whether I’m in law school or not, so those are not a factor. Tuition and opportunity cost are the only real considerations. If I can mitigate the tuition expense, I’m left to consider what my potential 18 to 20-year earnings could be with a B.A. in Business Admin, emphasis in Acquisitions/Contacting and a Minor in Accounting, compared with a three-year delay in beginning those earnings but with the addition of a J.D. I’ve created a few hypotheticals, and the J.D. always wins.

You all have given me good advice and much to consider. If anyone reading this has anything at all to add, please do so.

With Sincere Gratitude,

Duane

User avatar
Nova
Posts: 9116
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:55 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby Nova » Tue Dec 10, 2013 1:46 am

consider venturing solo. (Does this sound realistic?)

No. Almost everyone who tries fails

I plan to pursue personal injury and the associated medical malpractice

You need capital to do personal injury. so starting it up solo would be extremely difficult.

Some schools now even have rolling admissions, so a January start is possible.

Only at bad schools

it is very respectably ranked 68th.

USNWRank is meaningless. There are schools ranked in the hundreds that place much better that some schools in the top 50 (Texas tech >>>>> American). Use lawschooltransparency.com to compare job prospects. if youre going to go to a school outside the T14, be sure you are fine practicing law there long term. Hiring and reputation are extremely regional.

User avatar
iamgeorgebush
Posts: 851
Joined: Sat Oct 05, 2013 3:57 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby iamgeorgebush » Tue Dec 10, 2013 9:29 am

To echo Nova, don't go solo. If you were hiring an attorney for PI or medical malpractice, would you hire someone fresh out of law school with no legal work experience? I wouldn't.

Also to echo Nova (and to repeat myself), go to LST. That should determine your choice in schools, not USNWR.

sparty99
Posts: 1433
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2010 8:41 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby sparty99 » Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:27 am

I think it would be a significant struggle for you to find employment at any law firm, big or small. You will be 53 with no experience in the industry. The number of organizations that would hire you, are extremely low. I would not go unless you received a full-ride. Then again, I still might consider not going unless you had plans of going solo.

User avatar
A. Nony Mouse
Posts: 22872
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 11:51 am

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:37 am

sparty99 wrote:I think it would be a significant struggle for you to find employment at any law firm, big or small. You will be 53 with no experience in the industry. The number of organizations that would hire you, are extremely low. I would not go unless you received a full-ride. Then again, I still might consider not going unless you had plans of going solo.

I don't think this is universally true. You might/likely will struggle to find employment in biglaw (but then, the schools you're looking at aren't biglaw powerhouses in general). Small law hiring is so idiosyncratic and individual that I don't think you can generalize in the same way, and your chances would be shaped much more by your networking ability and connections than anything else. I'm not saying you won't run into problems (there's often a concern about whether you're really willing to start at the bottom doing the grunt work and taking orders from someone young enough to be your child), but I don't think it's as dire as the above suggests.

(And to be honest, how old/young you look may have an effect... if you're just finishing college now, you would probably be able to construct a resume where your age isn't immediately apparent.)

sparty99
Posts: 1433
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2010 8:41 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby sparty99 » Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:52 am

A. Nony Mouse wrote:
sparty99 wrote:I think it would be a significant struggle for you to find employment at any law firm, big or small. You will be 53 with no experience in the industry. The number of organizations that would hire you, are extremely low. I would not go unless you received a full-ride. Then again, I still might consider not going unless you had plans of going solo.

I don't think this is universally true. You might/likely will struggle to find employment in biglaw (but then, the schools you're looking at aren't biglaw powerhouses in general). Small law hiring is so idiosyncratic and individual that I don't think you can generalize in the same way, and your chances would be shaped much more by your networking ability and connections than anything else. I'm not saying you won't run into problems (there's often a concern about whether you're really willing to start at the bottom doing the grunt work and taking orders from someone young enough to be your child), but I don't think it's as dire as the above suggests.

(And to be honest, how old/young you look may have an effect... if you're just finishing college now, you would probably be able to construct a resume where your age isn't immediately apparent.)
]

But age will be apparent when you walk into the interview. Additionally, approaching mid-fifties is when many people start to experience age discrimination. I have seen this from people I know who were laid off from the recent and past recessions. This is why I think it is a huge risk to take on that debt at that age. Perhaps this could be less of an issue when the hiring Partner is also your age or a few years younger, but at age 50, this is not something that I would do.

User avatar
A. Nony Mouse
Posts: 22872
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 11:51 am

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Tue Dec 10, 2013 11:59 am

My point was that age may or may not be apparent on walking into the interview, depending on how young the OP looks. I find that people are generally pretty bad at guessing age.

But I agree it's a risk to consider when figuring out how much debt to take on.

RoaringMice
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2013 9:40 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby RoaringMice » Tue Dec 10, 2013 5:22 pm

I wonder if there are any other fields you might be interested in, where your age would not be a barrier to entry, and your years of business experience might be valued. What is it about the law that is drawing you, and can you find similar in another profession? Perhaps even one where you either wouldn't need additional education, or the years and cost would be shorter than that for law school?

For example, if you're intrigued by the idea of the regulatory/legal environment, and if you aren't tied to a geographic region, I'm wondering if you'd be interested in taking the Foreign Service Exam. Is that something you've thought of? You could work for an embassy or consulate abroad. If you're interested in the idea of helping people, you could look at social work. Etc.

duane13p
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2013 1:05 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby duane13p » Wed Dec 11, 2013 3:01 am

Thanks for the additional thoughts and replies. Another consensus here seems to be that I will have difficulty finding suitable employment after graduation because of my age, and in a pm it was suggested that going solo is not a really practical option for p.i./medical malpractice. Both are sound arguments. I must mention a few things that have been largely overlooked:

1. I am just finishing my undergraduate studies, so I'll be starting out in the job market either now with the BA or in 2-3 years with that PLUS a JD. Either way, I'll be in my early 50s starting out in a new field. I like my chances better with the esq behind my name, and I know that I won't have an easy time finding suitable employment as would a 25 year-old kid. And 50 is not as old as some might think! These days, that is the hill -- not 40.

2. Unless I want to start another business (I don't) my employment prospects are pretty bleak with a BA in a field with which I have no experience. A JD and Bar admission at least is a real, tangible asset that I might use to earn a better living than I could without it. An alternative is a Masters in Accounting or Business Management then CPA, but I'm looking at two years minimum to accomplish that.

3. When I started my college career many years ago, I was a Business Management (Accounting) major planning on going to law school upon graduation. I was not able to finish school (made it 1 1/2 years) because I couldn't afford it, despite a 1/2 tuition scholarship to a prestigious university (financial aid was just not available like it is today.) In a few months I'll be the first known university graduate in my extended family, and I have a very strong desire to realize my lifelong dream of becoming a lawyer.

I defer to all of you for advice on how to best accomplish this, and not to solicit discouragement (although I do understand the cautious advice.) My motivation is multi-faceted and includes personal desire, economic benefits, and altruism. The Twinkie defense in the Harvey Milk case was one of many similar reasons I wanted to become a lawyer in the first place: for every scumbag lawyer, or ambulance chaser, there needs to be an upstanding lawyer to oppose him.

Duane

User avatar
Nova
Posts: 9116
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:55 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby Nova » Wed Dec 11, 2013 3:06 am

dude, ambulance chaser is what assholes call personal injury lawyers to look down on them

User avatar
midwest17
Posts: 1686
Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2013 5:27 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby midwest17 » Wed Dec 11, 2013 9:22 am

Please don't actually put Esq after your name.

User avatar
Young Marino
Posts: 826
Joined: Fri Apr 26, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby Young Marino » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:16 am

Nova wrote:dude, ambulance chaser is what assholes call personal injury lawyers to look down on them

duane13p
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2013 1:05 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby duane13p » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:28 am

I used "ambulance chaser" to exemplify a type of unscrupulous lawyer. I also said that I want to do personal injury, so it should be clear that I did use that term in a derogatory way but certainly not as a reference to all lawyers who do p.i. Rather, to a select subgroup.

User avatar
midwest17
Posts: 1686
Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2013 5:27 pm

Re: 50 year-old with 3.68 ugpa and 160 LSAT (anticipated)

Postby midwest17 » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:51 am

Also, if you think the defense attorneys in the Harvey Milk case were "scumbags" and refer to the "Twinkie defense" as though it's a real thing, are you sure law is what you really want to do?




Return to “Law School Admissions Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], CHyde, Google [Bot] and 16 guests