Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

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Pricer
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Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Pricer » Thu Feb 17, 2011 5:10 am

I apologize in advance if this is in the wrong forum, but it seemed appropriate to put it here, as the question directly relates to my wanting to attend UT.

I have lived in Georgia all of my life, and I love it, but I hate the uneducated, bible-beating, conservative viewpoints that run rampant in the state. I have found that both Athens and Atlanta are much more tolerant, obviously due to Athens being comprised of 30,000 college students and Atlanta being completely different than (and oblivious to) any other city in the South.

I am heavily considering the University of Texas for law school. I have always heard that Texas is very conservative as a whole, but I have also heard many times that Austin is a very liberal and tolerant city. As I would plan to work in Houston or Dallas after graduation, I was wondering if anyone could offer any insight as to how these cities are as far as things of this nature are concerned. Will they hang me behind the church for not attending the sermons on Sunday mornings? Or does the hardcore conservative mindset apply to smaller cities and towns? Or is this just a completely misconstrued perception of Texas altogether?

ksimon2007
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby ksimon2007 » Thu Feb 17, 2011 5:22 am

Pricer wrote:I apologize in advance if this is in the wrong forum, but it seemed appropriate to put it here, as the question directly relates to my wanting to attend UT.

I have lived in Georgia all of my life, and I love it, but I hate the uneducated, bible-beating, conservative viewpoints that run rampant in the state. I have found that both Athens and Atlanta are much more tolerant, obviously due to Athens being comprised of 30,000 college students and Atlanta being completely different than (and oblivious to) any other city in the South.

I am heavily considering the University of Texas for law school. I have always heard that Texas is very conservative as a whole, but I have also heard many times that Austin is a very liberal and tolerant city. As I would plan to work in Houston or Dallas after graduation, I was wondering if anyone could offer any insight as to how these cities are as far as things of this nature are concerned. Will they hang me behind the church for not attending the sermons on Sunday mornings? Or does the hardcore conservative mindset apply to smaller cities and towns? Or is this just a completely misconstrued perception of Texas altogether?


I grew up in Houston and the city is far from conservative. There has not been a Republican mayor elected in my lifetime. Bill White was a moderate, but by no means conservative. The city is diverse and not religious to any noticeable extent.

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jacketman03
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby jacketman03 » Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:29 am

Austin is a hippie commune when compared to the state as a whole, so you'd be fine there. As far as Dallas/Houston, I would say, based on my experiences in both, that Houston is a bit more moderate than the Metroplex, but both areas are considerably more conservative than Austin. But in either city you shouldn't have many (if any) problems regarding your non-conservativeness.

too old for this sh*
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby too old for this sh* » Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:44 am

Grew up in Houston (we actually moved there in '70) and then I left the area in the mid-80's...got to Austin in the mid-90's and was out there for a little more than a decade. Only experiences with Dallas have been from the fringe while visiting friends up there (had a crash pad in Plano to use when I needed it).

Austin is generally the most laid-back area of the three. However, if you get north of town and into Williamson County, you can hear the banjoes at the county line if you listen close enough. Worlds apart. Also, the Austin vibe has changed a lot over the past decade as the Cali influx changed things...decibel levels were put into place for the downtown clubs due to the new condo owners whining about noise. Many of the things that once made Austin good have been lost...still a decent place to live but not what it once was.

Houston depends much on which side of town you are on. However, the city itself obviously has somewhat of a moderate bent to it...let's face it, Annise would likely have faced significant challenges in getting elected as Mayor in a more conservative area of the State.

Dallas just left me wanting to get away from the uptight atmosphere. I got spoiled in Austin with being able to be a lot more casual even if I wanted to go to a middlin' steakhouse (ie. Ruths Chris). Walking in to the one in the Plano area with the three of us in jeans got us crappy seating and even crappier service. It was not an isolated incident. I even felt I was dressed down relative to everyone else when I got invited to a Cowboys game in an endzone suite (it was owned by an acquaintance who was formerly a DA in the area). I do not know whether that same measure of attitude carries over to Fort Worth.

Given the choice out of the three areas, I would much rather be in Travis County (Austin).

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TurtlesAllTheWayDown
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby TurtlesAllTheWayDown » Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:48 am

In Dallas, we sacrifice a vegan every month to appease our god, Dick Chaney. It helps keep the socialism away.

It's actually a fairly liberal city; the rural areas surrounding it are a bit more conservative, though (this goes for about every major city in Texas). Austin is more liberal but also more vocal about how liberal they are. That's due mostly to the youthful exhuberance of 50,000 18-22 year old idealists.

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jacketman03
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby jacketman03 » Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:57 am

TurtlesAllTheWayDown wrote:
It's actually a fairly liberal city; the rural areas surrounding it are a bit more conservative, though

Ft. Worth is not rural, you smug Dallas resident. /sarcasm

But yes, I should have clarified, OP. Dallas=less conservative, rest of Metroplex=George W Bush gets standing ovations.

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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby too old for this sh* » Thu Feb 17, 2011 12:07 pm

TurtlesAllTheWayDown wrote:In Dallas, we sacrifice a vegan every month to appease our god, Dick Chaney. It helps keep the socialism away.

It's actually a fairly liberal city; the rural areas surrounding it are a bit more conservative, though (this goes for about every major city in Texas). Austin is more liberal but also more vocal about how liberal they are. That's due mostly to the youthful exhuberance of 50,000 18-22 year old idealists.


You might be surprised at how much of an influence the older population of the area plays in that area as well...check out Eeyore's Birthday Party sometime. Yeah, some kids will be there, but there is definitely a liberal bent to the much older crowd in attendance :lol:

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Pricer
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Pricer » Thu Feb 17, 2011 1:06 pm

I appreciate the input guys. I really like the responses.

Moderate is perfect for me. I'm not big on conservatism, but I don't need west coast liberalism either.

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upfish
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby upfish » Thu Feb 17, 2011 1:12 pm

I moved to Houston a year and a half ago from Tulsa, OK more or less on a whim. Tulsa and DFW have shitloads in common culturally, but Tulsa and Houston are a bit more far apart. That is to say, my experience has been that DFW is more conservative than Houston.

I live in Houston's gayborhood, and I love it. Lots to do, great food, great people, etc. As long as you stay inside the 610 loop, the city leans pretty liberal imho.

If you ever want to come visit and you like dive bars and dancing and good restaurants, I'd be happy to show you around my new home city. =D

ETA: Austin is okay too, but it's a little bit sleepy for me.

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Ty Webb
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Ty Webb » Thu Feb 17, 2011 1:13 pm

Houston has four million people, and it's expansive.

It can be what you want it to be, as with (I'd assume) any massive city.

The "Texas" you see in movies is not Houston, FWIW. I'm also from the deep south and I was shocked at how urban the city was compared to my expectations of Texas. Now, when you leave the city 30 miles in any direction, you'll get the type of Texas you might be expecting. You'll also run into a fair number of people that have moved to Houston from these areas, so there's still a bit of a down-home rodeo feel to it.

But as I said, the city is so large that you can find whatever kind of lifestyle/culture/tolerance/intolerance that you're interested in.

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upfish
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby upfish » Thu Feb 17, 2011 1:13 pm

Ty Webb wrote:Houston has four million people, and it's expansive.

It can be what you want it to be, as with (I'd assume) any massive city.

The "Texas" you see in movies is not Houston, FWIW. I'm also from the deep south and I was shocked at how urban the city was compared to my expectations of Texas. Now, when you leave the city 30 miles in any direction, you'll get the type of Texas you might be expecting. You'll also run into a fair number of people that have moved to Houston from these areas, so there's still a bit of a down-home rodeo feel to it.

But as I said, the city is so large that you can find whatever kind of lifestyle/culture/tolerance/intolerance that you're interested in.


+1 to this as well.

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Marionberry
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Marionberry » Thu Feb 17, 2011 5:18 pm

Ty Webb wrote:Houston has four million people, and it's expansive.

It can be what you want it to be, as with (I'd assume) any massive city.

The "Texas" you see in movies is not Houston, FWIW. I'm also from the deep south and I was shocked at how urban the city was compared to my expectations of Texas. Now, when you leave the city 30 miles in any direction, you'll get the type of Texas you might be expecting. You'll also run into a fair number of people that have moved to Houston from these areas, so there's still a bit of a down-home rodeo feel to it.

But as I said, the city is so large that you can find whatever kind of lifestyle/culture/tolerance/intolerance that you're interested in.


This is a very good answer to OPs question. I'm always surprised to see how many people think that the country's 4th largest city is going to be some kind of cowtown. It's a metropolis, with with everything that that brings.

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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby sparty99 » Thu Feb 17, 2011 7:27 pm

Houston has a large hispanic and asian population. Alsso, a good number of blacks. The state as a whole is quite conservative, but both Dallas and Houston are liberal (and boring, but so is Atlanta).

The surrounding suburbs in Dallas and Houston are very conservative, especially Dallas. How conservative? Well, Sarah Palin, visited Borders bookstore in Plano, Texas. Also, George W. Bush ran with ease.

The entire state of Texas is cheap. You will immediately feel rich upon arrival. People will have great pride for your Texas law degree. If you enjoy Atlanta, you will like Dallas. If you hated Atlanta, you might still like Dallas. They both don't have too much to offer young people (compared to other cities), but it's a great place to raise a family.

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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Pricer » Thu Feb 17, 2011 8:06 pm

sparty99 wrote:Houston has a large hispanic and asian population. Alsso, a good number of blacks. The state as a whole is quite conservative, but both Dallas and Houston are liberal (and boring, but so is Atlanta).

The surrounding suburbs in Dallas and Houston are very conservative, especially Dallas. How conservative? Well, Sarah Palin, visited Borders bookstore in Plano, Texas. Also, George W. Bush ran with ease.

The entire state of Texas is cheap. You will immediately feel rich upon arrival. People will have great pride for your Texas law degree. If you enjoy Atlanta, you will like Dallas. If you hated Atlanta, you might still like Dallas. They both don't have too much to offer young people (compared to other cities), but it's a great place to raise a family.


I love Atlanta. I really want to go to UT and live in Houston or Dallas for a several years just to get out of Georgia for a while. I eventually want to come back to Atlanta, but definitely not immediately. If I like Houston or Dallas as much as Atlanta, I wouldn't mind staying there until I retire, even. I'd just like to end my days in my home state.

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Marionberry
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Marionberry » Thu Feb 17, 2011 8:19 pm

Pricer wrote:
sparty99 wrote:Houston has a large hispanic and asian population. Alsso, a good number of blacks. The state as a whole is quite conservative, but both Dallas and Houston are liberal (and boring, but so is Atlanta).

The surrounding suburbs in Dallas and Houston are very conservative, especially Dallas. How conservative? Well, Sarah Palin, visited Borders bookstore in Plano, Texas. Also, George W. Bush ran with ease.

The entire state of Texas is cheap. You will immediately feel rich upon arrival. People will have great pride for your Texas law degree. If you enjoy Atlanta, you will like Dallas. If you hated Atlanta, you might still like Dallas. They both don't have too much to offer young people (compared to other cities), but it's a great place to raise a family.


I love Atlanta. I really want to go to UT and live in Houston or Dallas for a several years just to get out of Georgia for a while. I eventually want to come back to Atlanta, but definitely not immediately. If I like Houston or Dallas as much as Atlanta, I wouldn't mind staying there until I retire, even. I'd just like to end my days in my home state.


Though my exposure to Atlanta is pretty limited, it seems like it's probably closer to Houston culturally than any other city.

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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby MidlawMyth » Thu Feb 17, 2011 10:47 pm

Houston has an openly lesbian mayor, not the dirty South by any means.

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Marionberry
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Marionberry » Thu Feb 17, 2011 10:56 pm

MidlawMyth wrote:Houston has an openly lesbian mayor, not the dirty South by any means.


I think I know what you're getting at, but I have to disagree with the bolded.

Image

Image

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Pricer
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Pricer » Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:34 am

Ha turns out this thread was pointless. Just got WLed at Texas, where I have the median GPA and 75% LSAT. My number one choice struck me down.

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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby LLB2JD » Fri Feb 18, 2011 7:42 am

Pricer wrote:Ha turns out this thread was pointless. Just got WLed at Texas, where I have the median GPA and 75% LSAT. My number one choice struck me down.


Well, stay on that waitlist. You never know, you could get off it.

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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby rdcws000 » Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:10 am

Pricer wrote:Ha turns out this thread was pointless. Just got WLed at Texas, where I have the median GPA and 75% LSAT. My number one choice struck me down.


Well, hang in there, ya never know.

In my opinion, conservatism is the last thing you need to worry about in Dallas or Houston. You do need to consider Texasism though. This phenomenon persists in both cities, and though I sound like I'm joking, most non-native Texans know what I mean.

Texasism is an arrogance that comes from residing in a huge state with a valuable resource, an exciting history, and a cool looking flag. It is an attitude shared by both the left and the right that prompts some to put the state flag higher than the US flag, or even to get it tattoed on their bodies or painted on the back window of their truck. In some cases you can sense Texasism, and other times you will hear it in statements such as "That may be so, but IN THE STATE OF TEXAS, we do things differently". You will hear secession discussed, and you will be told a million times that Texas has the best _______, or you can only get _______ like this in Texas. It's a false uniqueness with a streak of "don't tread on me" liberty oddly mixed in with a <we don't take no crap> government and criminal justice system.

Don't get me wrong, I love Houston and there is a good chance I will live here for the rest of my life, but Texasism annoys me. It's just a state. Not only that, but it's actually pretty ugly and flat. All the rivers are brown. It is known for tons of cheap land, yet Houston and Dallas suburbs sprawl endlessly with .10 acre cookie cutter lots and homes, in the areas where there is some random semblance of zoning.

If you want to see some Texasim first hand, you probably will, right now, because above I said "It's just a state" and this is sure to have pissed some Texans off.

Also, P.S. don't be the prototypical small bible belt town guy who breaks out and becomes a raging liberal. There is alot of room in between.

sherpaorlawschool
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby sherpaorlawschool » Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:39 am

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Last edited by sherpaorlawschool on Tue Feb 14, 2012 4:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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jacketman03
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby jacketman03 » Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:41 am

sherpaorlawschool wrote:
rdcws000 wrote:
Pricer wrote:Ha turns out this thread was pointless. Just got WLed at Texas, where I have the median GPA and 75% LSAT. My number one choice struck me down.


Well, hang in there, ya never know.

In my opinion, conservatism is the last thing you need to worry about in Dallas or Houston. You do need to consider Texasism though. This phenomenon persists in both cities, and though I sound like I'm joking, most non-native Texans know what I mean.

Texasism is an arrogance that comes from residing in a huge state with a valuable resource, an exciting history, and a cool looking flag. It is an attitude shared by both the left and the right that prompts some to put the state flag higher than the US flag, or even to get it tattoed on their bodies or painted on the back window of their truck. In some cases you can sense Texasism, and other times you will hear it in statements such as "That may be so, but IN THE STATE OF TEXAS, we do things differently". You will hear secession discussed, and you will be told a million times that Texas has the best _______, or you can only get _______ like this in Texas. It's a false uniqueness with a streak of "don't tread on me" liberty oddly mixed in with a <we don't take no crap> government and criminal justice system.

Don't get me wrong, I love Houston and there is a good chance I will live here for the rest of my life, but Texasism annoys me. It's just a state. Not only that, but it's actually pretty ugly and flat. All the rivers are brown. It is known for tons of cheap land, yet Houston and Dallas suburbs sprawl endlessly with .10 acre cookie cutter lots and homes, in the areas where there is some random semblance of zoning.

If you want to see some Texasim first hand, you probably will, right now, because above I said "It's just a state" and this is sure to have pissed some Texans off.

Also, P.S. don't be the prototypical small bible belt town guy who breaks out and becomes a raging liberal. There is alot of room in between.


+1 Born and raised in Texas and I can attest to the prominence of Texasism..it's more prominent than any loyalties to a particular political ideology. I think the most compelling evidence for its existence is when Rick Perry threatened to secede at one of the Tea Party rallies and his approval ratings went up lol. I don't think the conservatism is overwhelming though, even in the smaller towns. There are prominent liberals involved in politics in many of the more rural areas. In fact, (former) Congressman Chet Edwards was receiving some consideration for Obama's VP nomination if I remember correctly. I think he was one of the final 3 to 5 candidates on the list? He's up in Waco of all places and represented a relatively rural congressional district. The politics of Texas as a whole lean conservative but there are certainly exceptions and I think Texas is more moderate than much of the deep south.

That being said, I love Texas and will seriously consider returning after law school. Oh, and dirt cheap land FTW.

If you think Chet's a liberal... My liberal friends in the district were actually kind of glad he lost this last time bc of his non-liberalness.

sherpaorlawschool
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby sherpaorlawschool » Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:54 am

jacketman03 wrote:If you think Chet's a liberal... My liberal friends in the district were actually kind of glad he lost this last time bc of his non-liberalness.


I think that's consistent with what I said. I guess it sort of just depends on what we mean when we say liberal. For what the OP is looking for, a politician like Edwards may be somewhat in line with his/her views aside from his same-sex marriage views.

I will grant that he was considered a moderate democrat by many liberals but my point was simply that politicians/people with liberal to moderate views can survive in what would be considered more rural/conservative areas. Since those areas tend to be more conservative than the big cities, I wouldn't imagine that there would be a problem for the OP with residing in the cities or dealing with the politics of those cities.

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jacketman03
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby jacketman03 » Fri Feb 18, 2011 11:03 am

sherpaorlawschool wrote:
jacketman03 wrote:If you think Chet's a liberal... My liberal friends in the district were actually kind of glad he lost this last time bc of his non-liberalness.


I think that's consistent with what I said. I guess it sort of just depends on what we mean when we say liberal. For what the OP is looking for, a politician like Edwards may be somewhat in line with his/her views aside from his same-sex marriage views.

I will grant that he was considered a moderate democrat by many liberals but my point was simply that politicians/people with liberal to moderate views can survive in what would be considered more rural/conservative areas. Since those areas tend to be more conservative than the big cities, I wouldn't imagine that there would be a problem for the OP with residing in the cities or dealing with the politics of those cities.

Yeah, I guess we were kind of saying the same thing. As a friend of mine was telling me not too long ago, Texas isn't nearly as conservative as Massachusetts is liberal. We're fairly moderate-ish.

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Kinderby
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Re: Dallas/Houston vs. Texas

Postby Kinderby » Fri Feb 18, 2011 11:10 am

jacketman03 wrote:Yeah, I guess we were kind of saying the same thing. As a friend of mine was telling me not too long ago, Texas isn't nearly as conservative as Massachusetts is liberal. We're fairly moderate-ish.

Good lord, this is what moderate looks like? :shock: :D

I agree with what most people have said, though. Dallas County was the only county in north Texas to vote for Obama in '08. I probably feel about Texas the way you feel about Georgia. Very much love-hate. And as liberal as I feel comparatively, and get annoyed by some 'Texas is the best state everrrr' mentality, I still have a lot of Texas pride.

More people here are conservative, but in any city, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, you're going to find other viewpoints (less so in FW, I think because there is SO much money here, but it is still here).




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