Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

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Anon115523

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by Anon115523 » Wed May 13, 2020 7:36 pm

HarrisonK wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 3:42 pm
Possible NYC lawyers never return. JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley, and Barclays say it is "highly unlikely" employees will ever return to their NYC offices. Additionally, Twitter is WFH forever. It may be coming to the legal industry sooner than we think.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/12/nyre ... -home.html
That's not really what this article is saying. They said its highly unlikely that all employees will return to their offices, which is pretty obvious at this point.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by nealric » Wed May 13, 2020 7:48 pm

VulcanVulcanVulcan wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 7:06 pm
nealric wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 5:47 pm
QContinuum wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 4:56 pm
HarrisonK wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 3:42 pm
Possible NYC lawyers never return. JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley, and Barclays say it is "highly unlikely" employees will ever return to their NYC offices. Additionally, Twitter is WFH forever. It may be coming to the legal industry sooner than we think.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/12/nyre ... -home.html
I agree that the number of people working in the office will never return to what it used to be. For years leading up to this pandemic, companies have prioritized saving rent dollars by packing workers ever more closely together. First the offices vanished in favor of cubicles. Then the cubicles vanished and it was assigned desks. Then even the assigned desks vanished, in favor of unassigned, first-come first-served desks and workstations, on the notion that there's always some fraction of the workforce that'll be out on any given day due to illness, vacation, etc.

Now everyone's terrified of these unassigned, open workspaces, and rightly so. There's zero social distancing and there's great concern over coming in and using the same keyboard and mouse someone else used earlier that day or the previous day. Companies are moving back toward assigned desks/cubicles at a minimum, and even then, assigned desks/cubicles didn't use to provide 6 feet of spacing between coworkers. Overnight, companies will be losing huge numbers of workstations due to social distancing and moving back to assigned desks/cubicles, and I don't foresee companies being willing to double their rent footprint to provide assigned, socially distanced desks to employees who can, at least in theory, WFH indefinitely.

But the fact of the matter is, top talent generally wants to work in the office. It's why companies have maintained offices in expensive cities like NYC and Silicon Valley and LA and Seattle to begin with. Employees that were easier to recruit/replace were relegated to cheaper offices in secondary cities - in Huntsville, AL; Phoenix; Kansas City; DFW; even Wheeling, WV - years ago. I predict these employees will be the first to go WFH. You had, say, customer service agents sitting side by side in an office in Arizona - that company's not gonna want to double its footprint in Arizona so they can all sit 6 feet apart. Instead the customer service agents will all be moved to WFH and the company will actually end up saving money.

Secondarily, there will be an increased move to reduce in-office headcount in the cities too. In the law firm context, this might mean paralegals and staff attorneys being asked to WFH indefinitely.

But I really don't see companies going "all virtual". Just not going to happen.

(This is distinct from allowing employees to WFH indefinitely. I predict many companies and law firms will do this, out of liability/PR fears. But many employees will not take up this offer, either because they genuinely prefer working in the office or because they fear, rightly or wrongly, that indefinite WFH will harm their career prospects.)
I agree with this take. Although virtual connectivity does work really well in general, there are some things that are far better done with in-person interaction. Anything requiring team building, sales, or negotiation is very difficult to do effectively remotely. Moreover, managers are more likely to treat people well that they actually know and work with as opposed to faceless voices on the phone or disembodied heads on video conference apps.

On a related note, my hope is that this slows the steady erosion of personal space in the office. There are some jobs where it's helpful to work shoulder to shoulder, but law is most certainly not one of them. Interestingly, my company was in the process of designing new interiors for a new office building as COVID-19 hit. It will be interesting to see how it changes their plans.
I think it might actually go the other way -- lots of other professional services companies have gone to "hoteling" office setups where you don't have a permanent space. You offload some real estate costs on employees by making it easier to work at home / harder to work from an office, without going to the dreaded open office setup. I do think "open office" has definitely peaked, but I don't think it will be replaced by anything better. Companies are always looking to reduce real estate costs, and aren't inclined to suddenly spend a lot more. Is essentially mandated work from home better than a sea of desks?

I don't really understand how hoteling works, for what it's worth -- where do you keep your stuff? Lawyers have lots of binders and books and stuff.
Hoteling is an absolutely awful idea. As far as I can tell, they do it to make the office as bad as possible so workers will go to client sites- not an option in other industries.

I worked with a Big4 partner who would rant about it every chance he got. It was a big part of the reason why he left the firm. They saved what? $10k a year in real estate costs and lost a partner who they were likely paying around $1MM.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by Anonymous User » Wed May 13, 2020 7:59 pm

nealric wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 5:47 pm
On a related note, my hope is that this slows the steady erosion of personal space in the office. There are some jobs where it's helpful to work shoulder to shoulder, but law is most certainly not one of them. Interestingly, my company was in the process of designing new interiors for a new office building as COVID-19 hit. It will be interesting to see how it changes their plans.
Your hope may come true. At my firm, they've already announced that when we go back, juniors will no longer be required to share an office.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by parkslope » Wed May 13, 2020 11:54 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 7:59 pm
nealric wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 5:47 pm
On a related note, my hope is that this slows the steady erosion of personal space in the office. There are some jobs where it's helpful to work shoulder to shoulder, but law is most certainly not one of them. Interestingly, my company was in the process of designing new interiors for a new office building as COVID-19 hit. It will be interesting to see how it changes their plans.
Your hope may come true. At my firm, they've already announced that when we go back, juniors will no longer be required to share an office.
The fact that indoor transmission seems to be the dominant vector of infection makes me think that WFH could last until next year: https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101 ... 20053058v1

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by Excellent117 » Thu May 14, 2020 12:31 pm

QContinuum wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 4:56 pm
But the fact of the matter is, top talent generally wants to work in the office.
I would push back on the assertion that this is generally true. This is going to depend on a ton of factors (personality traits, familial status, daily commute, etc.).

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by notinbiglaw » Thu May 14, 2020 1:31 pm

Even Fox News and News Corp are telling people to WFH if they can. They are selling infotainment, not telling you what they actually believe.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by The Lsat Airbender » Thu May 14, 2020 1:53 pm

notinbiglaw wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 1:31 pm
Even Fox News and News Corp are telling people to WFH if they can. They are selling infotainment, not telling you what they actually believe.
I like this take, but tbf having a WFH policy in place is more a sign of "our lawyers told us to follow NYS requirements" than actual beliefs about the efficacy of such a policy.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by QContinuum » Thu May 14, 2020 3:01 pm

Excellent117 wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 12:31 pm
QContinuum wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 4:56 pm
But the fact of the matter is, top talent generally wants to work in the office.
I would push back on the assertion that this is generally true. This is going to depend on a ton of factors (personality traits, familial status, daily commute, etc.).
Obviously there are individual exceptions, but I think the proof is in the pudding. If top talent didn't generally want to work in the office, BigTech, BigLaw, etc. would've decamped for the 'burbs, or cheaper cities, long ago. There's a reason why these companies, despite their laser focus on cost-cutting, haven't relocated their main offices to NJ or CT where they'd save oodles on rent and taxes. There's a reason why Google, Facebook, etc. still maintain large offices in Silicon Valley, instead of relocating to, say, Fresno. Keep in mind that the decisionmakers at these companies are the single constituency most likely to live outside the urban core. BigLaw associates overwhelmingly live in the city; it's the partners who commute in from Westchester and Fairfield and Nassau. If not for concerns over recruiting, the top brass would be thrilled to have an office with ample parking and cheap rent in Westchester instead of Manhattan.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by TexasBigLaw » Thu May 14, 2020 3:02 pm

Excellent117 wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 7:18 pm
TexasBigLaw wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 5:41 pm
the support staff is likely to go back on a rotating schedule sooner than the attorneys.
This is just horrible optics.
Agreed. I understand why, to some extent it makes sense, but it just looks really bad. The firm did make clear that anyone who doesn't feel comfortable coming back will be permitted to WFH indefinitely, including support staff.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by nixy » Thu May 14, 2020 4:45 pm

QContinuum wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 3:01 pm
Excellent117 wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 12:31 pm
QContinuum wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 4:56 pm
But the fact of the matter is, top talent generally wants to work in the office.
I would push back on the assertion that this is generally true. This is going to depend on a ton of factors (personality traits, familial status, daily commute, etc.).
Obviously there are individual exceptions, but I think the proof is in the pudding. If top talent didn't generally want to work in the office, BigTech, BigLaw, etc. would've decamped for the 'burbs, or cheaper cities, long ago. There's a reason why these companies, despite their laser focus on cost-cutting, haven't relocated their main offices to NJ or CT where they'd save oodles on rent and taxes. There's a reason why Google, Facebook, etc. still maintain large offices in Silicon Valley, instead of relocating to, say, Fresno. Keep in mind that the decisionmakers at these companies are the single constituency most likely to live outside the urban core. BigLaw associates overwhelmingly live in the city; it's the partners who commute in from Westchester and Fairfield and Nassau. If not for concerns over recruiting, the top brass would be thrilled to have an office with ample parking and cheap rent in Westchester instead of Manhattan.
I think this underestimates both the strength of tradition and the importance of offices as signaling importance/wealth, especially to clients/other visitors. Having fancy offices in an "elite" city isn't just about where people personally prefer to get work done. I also think it depends on how you define "generally." Even if a preponderance of powers that be prefer to work in the office, that still allows for a lot of top talent who wouldn't.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by JusticeSquee » Thu May 14, 2020 6:12 pm

QContinuum wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 3:01 pm
Excellent117 wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 12:31 pm
QContinuum wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 4:56 pm
But the fact of the matter is, top talent generally wants to work in the office.
I would push back on the assertion that this is generally true. This is going to depend on a ton of factors (personality traits, familial status, daily commute, etc.).
Obviously there are individual exceptions, but I think the proof is in the pudding. If top talent didn't generally want to work in the office, BigTech, BigLaw, etc. would've decamped for the 'burbs, or cheaper cities, long ago. There's a reason why these companies, despite their laser focus on cost-cutting, haven't relocated their main offices to NJ or CT where they'd save oodles on rent and taxes. There's a reason why Google, Facebook, etc. still maintain large offices in Silicon Valley, instead of relocating to, say, Fresno. Keep in mind that the decisionmakers at these companies are the single constituency most likely to live outside the urban core. BigLaw associates overwhelmingly live in the city; it's the partners who commute in from Westchester and Fairfield and Nassau. If not for concerns over recruiting, the top brass would be thrilled to have an office with ample parking and cheap rent in Westchester instead of Manhattan.
To be honest, I'd rather have the office be in Westchester instead of Manhattan too (coming from a 20-something associate). Would mean I could live in a cheapish apartment in Yonkers or something and still easily get to work. Manhattan can be such a drag sometimes.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by ghostoftraynor » Sun May 17, 2020 7:43 pm

Wrt big, national firms, I think they will follow New York's lead. It doesn't make that much sense to follow a segmented approach, and they don't do that in other key areas (i.e., salary).

Given that assumption, my prediction is we may see some firms officially reopening sometime this summer, but not requiring face-time until a vaccine (fingers crossed that will come).

In practice, I think that means you see more people coming into the office, but probably most still working from home most days. There are definitely benefits to being in the office, but don't think those benefits justify the public safety concerns.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by cisscum » Sun May 17, 2020 8:54 pm

ghostoftraynor wrote:
Sun May 17, 2020 7:43 pm
Wrt big, national firms, I think they will follow New York's lead. It doesn't make that much sense to follow a segmented approach, and they don't do that in other key areas (i.e., salary).

Given that assumption, my prediction is we may see some firms officially reopening sometime this summer, but not requiring face-time until a vaccine (fingers crossed that will come).

In practice, I think that means you see more people coming into the office, but probably most still working from home most days. There are definitely benefits to being in the office, but don't think those benefits justify the public safety concerns.

Given the crowds in NYC over the weekend I'm starting to think the return to normality is going to come sooner rather than later. So much of this is psychological, and the psychology is already starting to change.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by HarrisonK » Mon May 18, 2020 9:24 am

The idea that we wont be back to work until a vaccine is developed is silly. There is no guarantee that a vaccine will ever be available as there are plenty of viruses that a vaccine has never been developed for or the development of a vaccine took over 30 years. Additionally, there is no guarantee that a vaccine would be effective enough to achieve herd immunity (which I believe is the goal of a vaccine). For example, the flu vaccine is only 45% effective.

We need to start thinking about what happens to the legal industry assuming a vaccine is never developed.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by Anonymous User » Mon May 18, 2020 11:08 am

I tried to post a thread related to this, but apparently it was not approved for whatever reason so I guess I'll just post my question here.

Anybody have a lease renewal coming up soon and unsure what to do? I currently pay a premium to live close to my nyc office but my firm has communicated it may be at least another 6 months before we start really working in the office again.

I'm strongly considering either 1. Moving further away from the office (1hr+ commute) or 2. Moving to my home state and living with my family. If I do option 2, I'd be able to save an additional 20-25k over 6 months.

If I renew my lease and spend 6 more months working from home, that would be a complete waste of money imo.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by ghostoftraynor » Mon May 18, 2020 11:17 am

The idea that lawyers need to be in an office to do a job they can do perfectly fine at home before the health risk has been reduced is silly (said vaccine, but effective treatments, herd immunity from infections, or something similar works too). And a vaccine that is only 45% effective would be a huge boost and probably good enough.

I agree seems like return to normalcy is going to happen soonish whether prudent or not. People seem to be following the rules less and less where strict restrictions are still in place. But, law firms aren't restaurants. We don't need to figure out how to open up in a less than ideal environment.

And, to be clear, I think offices will be open sometime this summer. But, facetime requirements are going to be materially changed until there is a vaccine (or some other development that materially reduces the risk). NY offices aren't going to make their associates take the subway to work when health outcomes are what they are currently. And, big firms aren't going to demand facetime when their colleagues in NY are all at home working in sweats.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by cisscum » Mon May 18, 2020 11:25 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 11:08 am
I tried to post a thread related to this, but apparently it was not approved for whatever reason so I guess I'll just post my question here.

Anybody have a lease renewal coming up soon and unsure what to do? I currently pay a premium to live close to my nyc office but my firm has communicated it may be at least another 6 months before we start really working in the office again.

I'm strongly considering either 1. Moving further away from the office (1hr+ commute) or 2. Moving to my home state and living with my family. If I do option 2, I'd be able to save an additional 20-25k over 6 months.

If I renew my lease and spend 6 more months working from home, that would be a complete waste of money imo.
Don't renew. You can always come back earlier if need be.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by Anonymous User » Mon May 18, 2020 12:31 pm

I heard that some NYC offices are still technically open -- and people have the option of coming in. Is that true?

Also, I wonder if people who choose to come in when offices are open again will have some sort of an advantage over those who choose to stay home, either for convenience, care obligations, or other concerns. Oftentimes biglaw has this performative "working hard" thing that doesn't always reflect who is actually working hard or doing good work, for example. Would people in offices be seen as working harder than those at home?

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by LBJ's Hair » Mon May 18, 2020 12:51 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:31 pm
I heard that some NYC offices are still technically open -- and people have the option of coming in. Is that true?

Also, I wonder if people who choose to come in when offices are open again will have some sort of an advantage over those who choose to stay home, either for convenience, care obligations, or other concerns. Oftentimes biglaw has this performative "working hard" thing that doesn't always reflect who is actually working hard or doing good work, for example. Would people in offices be seen as working harder than those at home?
Social capital is important in all jobs, and it's just harder to build remotely. I don't just mean "face time," but casual conversations with partners in their office after a call, mid-day coffee runs, etc. All the little things that turn a professional relationship into a personal one.

To me the cost of WFH isn't so much "people don't think you're working hard"--if you're sending an email at 3am and billing 250 hour months, your partners know you're grinding. It's more "people don't associate a face/personality with your email signature."

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by Lesion of Doom » Mon May 18, 2020 1:10 pm

The one certainty is that a lag will exist between the time that the city mostly reopens and when associates are required to return to the office. I intend to maximize that time (responsibly) as much as possible. Gotta find the silver linings where they exist.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by nealric » Mon May 18, 2020 1:28 pm

LBJ's Hair wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:51 pm
Anonymous User wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:31 pm
I heard that some NYC offices are still technically open -- and people have the option of coming in. Is that true?

Also, I wonder if people who choose to come in when offices are open again will have some sort of an advantage over those who choose to stay home, either for convenience, care obligations, or other concerns. Oftentimes biglaw has this performative "working hard" thing that doesn't always reflect who is actually working hard or doing good work, for example. Would people in offices be seen as working harder than those at home?
Social capital is important in all jobs, and it's just harder to build remotely. I don't just mean "face time," but casual conversations with partners in their office after a call, mid-day coffee runs, etc. All the little things that turn a professional relationship into a personal one.

To me the cost of WFH isn't so much "people don't think you're working hard"--if you're sending an email at 3am and billing 250 hour months, your partners know you're grinding. It's more "people don't associate a face/personality with your email signature."
Very true. People are more likely to go to bat for you and treat you well when they think of you as a human being rather than a faceless task robot. Very hard to build deeper human relationships remotely.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by TheoO » Mon May 18, 2020 1:47 pm

JusticeSquee wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 6:12 pm
QContinuum wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 3:01 pm
Excellent117 wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 12:31 pm
QContinuum wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 4:56 pm
But the fact of the matter is, top talent generally wants to work in the office.
I would push back on the assertion that this is generally true. This is going to depend on a ton of factors (personality traits, familial status, daily commute, etc.).
Obviously there are individual exceptions, but I think the proof is in the pudding. If top talent didn't generally want to work in the office, BigTech, BigLaw, etc. would've decamped for the 'burbs, or cheaper cities, long ago. There's a reason why these companies, despite their laser focus on cost-cutting, haven't relocated their main offices to NJ or CT where they'd save oodles on rent and taxes. There's a reason why Google, Facebook, etc. still maintain large offices in Silicon Valley, instead of relocating to, say, Fresno. Keep in mind that the decisionmakers at these companies are the single constituency most likely to live outside the urban core. BigLaw associates overwhelmingly live in the city; it's the partners who commute in from Westchester and Fairfield and Nassau. If not for concerns over recruiting, the top brass would be thrilled to have an office with ample parking and cheap rent in Westchester instead of Manhattan.
To be honest, I'd rather have the office be in Westchester instead of Manhattan too (coming from a 20-something associate). Would mean I could live in a cheapish apartment in Yonkers or something and still easily get to work. Manhattan can be such a drag sometimes.
If you think Manhattan can be a drag, wait until you live in Yonkers (from someone who has relatives in Yonkers).

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by Anonymous User » Mon May 18, 2020 2:00 pm

LBJ's Hair wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:51 pm
Anonymous User wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:31 pm
I heard that some NYC offices are still technically open -- and people have the option of coming in. Is that true?

Also, I wonder if people who choose to come in when offices are open again will have some sort of an advantage over those who choose to stay home, either for convenience, care obligations, or other concerns. Oftentimes biglaw has this performative "working hard" thing that doesn't always reflect who is actually working hard or doing good work, for example. Would people in offices be seen as working harder than those at home?
Social capital is important in all jobs, and it's just harder to build remotely. I don't just mean "face time," but casual conversations with partners in their office after a call, mid-day coffee runs, etc. All the little things that turn a professional relationship into a personal one.

To me the cost of WFH isn't so much "people don't think you're working hard"--if you're sending an email at 3am and billing 250 hour months, your partners know you're grinding. It's more "people don't associate a face/personality with your email signature."
I agree, although in my experience, associates definitely overestimate how intensely partners monitor associates' time. Unless they are personally working with you closely and often, they don't really know how busy you are.

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by cisscum » Mon May 18, 2020 2:16 pm

nealric wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 1:28 pm
LBJ's Hair wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:51 pm
Anonymous User wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:31 pm
I heard that some NYC offices are still technically open -- and people have the option of coming in. Is that true?

Also, I wonder if people who choose to come in when offices are open again will have some sort of an advantage over those who choose to stay home, either for convenience, care obligations, or other concerns. Oftentimes biglaw has this performative "working hard" thing that doesn't always reflect who is actually working hard or doing good work, for example. Would people in offices be seen as working harder than those at home?
Social capital is important in all jobs, and it's just harder to build remotely. I don't just mean "face time," but casual conversations with partners in their office after a call, mid-day coffee runs, etc. All the little things that turn a professional relationship into a personal one.

To me the cost of WFH isn't so much "people don't think you're working hard"--if you're sending an email at 3am and billing 250 hour months, your partners know you're grinding. It's more "people don't associate a face/personality with your email signature."
Very true. People are more likely to go to bat for you and treat you well when they think of you as a human being rather than a faceless task robot. Very hard to build deeper human relationships remotely.
The way to solve this is by not allowing anyone to come into the office on regular basis, or designate one or two days a month where everyone comes in for a meeting. That way nobody has an unfair advantage

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Re: Prediction: When will NYC lawyers return to the office?

Post by nealric » Mon May 18, 2020 2:21 pm

cisscum wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 2:16 pm
nealric wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 1:28 pm
LBJ's Hair wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:51 pm
Anonymous User wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 12:31 pm
I heard that some NYC offices are still technically open -- and people have the option of coming in. Is that true?

Also, I wonder if people who choose to come in when offices are open again will have some sort of an advantage over those who choose to stay home, either for convenience, care obligations, or other concerns. Oftentimes biglaw has this performative "working hard" thing that doesn't always reflect who is actually working hard or doing good work, for example. Would people in offices be seen as working harder than those at home?
Social capital is important in all jobs, and it's just harder to build remotely. I don't just mean "face time," but casual conversations with partners in their office after a call, mid-day coffee runs, etc. All the little things that turn a professional relationship into a personal one.

To me the cost of WFH isn't so much "people don't think you're working hard"--if you're sending an email at 3am and billing 250 hour months, your partners know you're grinding. It's more "people don't associate a face/personality with your email signature."
Very true. People are more likely to go to bat for you and treat you well when they think of you as a human being rather than a faceless task robot. Very hard to build deeper human relationships remotely.
The way to solve this is by not allowing anyone to come into the office on regular basis, or designate one or two days a month where everyone comes in for a meeting. That way nobody has an unfair advantage
You and I both know that isn't happening. Besides, big meetings don't exactly comply with the social distancing imperative. Beyond that, any decent business WANTS those interpersonal relationship to form. You work better with people you know on a personal level.

Seriously? What are you waiting for?

Now there's a charge.
Just kidding ... it's still FREE!


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