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Master's GPA

Posted: Sun May 03, 2020 12:53 pm
by grover3312
I have an undergraduate degree from the University of Arkansas with a 3.69 GPA. I have been a teacher for 3 years and have been working on a Master's in Educational Leadership. My Master's GPA is 4.0. How much will my master's GPA play a role in deciding my admissions chances?

Re: Master's GPA

Posted: Sun May 03, 2020 2:54 pm
by cavalier1138
No.

Your master's degree will have an impact (as a "soft" factor), but your graduate GPA will not come into play.

Re: Master's GPA

Posted: Wed May 13, 2020 12:22 pm
by nope.nope.nah.
grover3312 wrote:
Sun May 03, 2020 12:53 pm
I have an undergraduate degree from the University of Arkansas with a 3.69 GPA. I have been a teacher for 3 years and have been working on a Master's in Educational Leadership. My Master's GPA is 4.0. How much will my master's GPA play a role in deciding my admissions chances?
The MA is a soft, but the GPA won't matter.

Re: Master's GPA

Posted: Wed May 13, 2020 12:41 pm
by QContinuum
nope.nope.nah. wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 12:22 pm
grover3312 wrote:
Sun May 03, 2020 12:53 pm
I have an undergraduate degree from the University of Arkansas with a 3.69 GPA. I have been a teacher for 3 years and have been working on a Master's in Educational Leadership. My Master's GPA is 4.0. How much will my master's GPA play a role in deciding my admissions chances?
The MA is a soft, but the GPA won't matter.
Also, not to pooh-pooh the Master's in any way, but for law school admissions purposes, I wouldn't expect it to really move the needle at all. You'd be surprised how many law school applicants have done TfA or taught English abroad or have some other kind of teaching/mentoring experience. Your teaching experience is more extensive, but I wouldn't expect that to really make a significant difference in law school admissions offices.

(To really move the needle for law school admissions, you'd probably want to have, I dunno, 5+ years of full-time teaching experience, or experience working as a principal or other educational leader. 3 years as a teacher doesn't quite differentiate you sufficiently from the many folks who've taken a "gap" year or two between college and law school. I'm not saying you ought to wait another few years before applying to law school, just that you should anticipate that your admissions outcomes will be driven almost entirely by your undergraduate GPA (as calculated by LSAC) and your LSAT score.)

(Again, none of this is to at all minimize your work experience or your Master's program. Teaching's very important and we as a country desperately need more qualified educators, including educators with solid leadership skills. I'm speaking in the paragraph above solely to the law school admissions piece of this.)

Re: Master's GPA

Posted: Wed May 13, 2020 1:36 pm
by nope.nope.nah.
QContinuum wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 12:41 pm
nope.nope.nah. wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 12:22 pm
grover3312 wrote:
Sun May 03, 2020 12:53 pm
I have an undergraduate degree from the University of Arkansas with a 3.69 GPA. I have been a teacher for 3 years and have been working on a Master's in Educational Leadership. My Master's GPA is 4.0. How much will my master's GPA play a role in deciding my admissions chances?
The MA is a soft, but the GPA won't matter.
Also, not to pooh-pooh the Master's in any way, but for law school admissions purposes, I wouldn't expect it to really move the needle at all. You'd be surprised how many law school applicants have done TfA or taught English abroad or have some other kind of teaching/mentoring experience. Your teaching experience is more extensive, but I wouldn't expect that to really make a significant difference in law school admissions offices.

(To really move the needle for law school admissions, you'd probably want to have, I dunno, 5+ years of full-time teaching experience, or experience working as a principal or other educational leader. 3 years as a teacher doesn't quite differentiate you sufficiently from the many folks who've taken a "gap" year or two between college and law school. I'm not saying you ought to wait another few years before applying to law school, just that you should anticipate that your admissions outcomes will be driven almost entirely by your undergraduate GPA (as calculated by LSAC) and your LSAT score.)

(Again, none of this is to at all minimize your work experience or your Master's program. Teaching's very important and we as a country desperately need more qualified educators, including educators with solid leadership skills. I'm speaking in the paragraph above solely to the law school admissions piece of this.)
ha I was thinking the same, but didn't have the mental energy to put it into words that didn't sound rude. Teaching 3 years seems right on the cusp between "I had a first career and law school is a change" and "gap year where I did stuff."