Am I a URM???/Is___ race/circumstance considered URM??

(BLS, URM status, non-traditional, GLBT)
Post Reply
dvlthndr

Bronze
Posts: 148
Joined: Mon Jun 24, 2019 10:34 pm

Re: Am I a URM???/Is___ race/circumstance considered URM??

Post by dvlthndr » Thu May 07, 2020 8:49 pm

thedragon5678 wrote:Does the LGBT community get an admissions advantage at Harvard, Columbia, or NYU? Do other hispanics (not Mexican or Puerto Rican)?
Those do not make you URM. But they are still "soft" factors that will marginally increase your odds of getting in. They merit writing a diversity statement to submit with the rest of your application materials.

nchrpmn

New
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2020 1:54 am

Re: Am I a URM???/Is___ race/circumstance considered URM??

Post by nchrpmn » Sat Jun 06, 2020 2:02 am

Besides Grutter v. Bollinger, is there any evidence for the idea that only those 4 groups -- AAs, Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and Puerto Ricans -- are considered URMS, and not other Hispanic groups? When a law school publishes diversity statistics, they don't differentiate between any of the Hispanic groups, it just says "Hispanic." Why would a law school be less inclined to take a Colombian than a Mexican applicant if it has no bearing on their diversity statistics?

The Lsat Airbender

Silver
Posts: 857
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2019 7:34 pm

Re: Am I a URM???/Is___ race/circumstance considered URM??

Post by The Lsat Airbender » Mon Jun 08, 2020 12:55 pm

nchrpmn wrote:
Sat Jun 06, 2020 2:02 am
Besides Grutter v. Bollinger, is there any evidence for the idea that only those 4 groups -- AAs, Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and Puerto Ricans -- are considered URMS, and not other Hispanic groups? When a law school publishes diversity statistics, they don't differentiate between any of the Hispanic groups, it just says "Hispanic." Why would a law school be less inclined to take a Colombian than a Mexican applicant if it has no bearing on their diversity statistics?
Because 1) African-Americans, Native Americans, Puerto Ricans and Mexican-Americans are woefully underrepresented in U.S. legal practice compared to their U.S. population and 2) those same groups underperform on the LSAT and get fewer bachelor's degrees than other groups because of inequities in our education system and elsewhere. Those are "hard," mathematical problems that need to be overcome by policy in order to admit reasonably-diverse classes. Law schools need to compromise on GPA and LSAT here.

Hispanic heritage, in a vacuum, is a "soft" factor, like speaking fluent Arabic or having a PhD. To be a bit cynical, law schools don't need to dip in terms of LSAT to get more people whose last name is Alvarez if they want to pad their diversity numbers for marketing purposes.

ETA: I don't mean to suggest that other Hispanic people don't face adversity in the USA. But they aren't as underrepresented in elite law schools because a lot of top students from LatAm universities apply.

Want to continue reading?

Register now to search topics and post comments!

Absolutely FREE!


Post Reply

Return to “Under Represented Law Student Forum”