3.03 156/158

Not sure where your numbers will get you? Dying to know where you stand? Come have your palms read by your fellow posters!
luckboxr

New
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:34 pm

3.03 156/158

Postby luckboxr » Tue Jun 28, 2016 9:06 pm

Hello everyone,

This year, I applied late in the cycle for law school using a 2016 February LSAT score; I received a 70% merit based scholarship (I need to maintain a 2.9GPA—2.8 is the median) to Chapman in California (yes, I know this school is bad) with a 3.03 and 156, but I recently retook the lsat and saw a 2 point increase in my score. This is Chapman's lsat policy: "The ABA has changed the rule regarding the reporting of the highest of multiple LSAT scores, however, this does not change the review process. If the candidate has taken the LSAT multiple times, the Committee will review all of the LSAT scores. From an admissions perspective, the average score may be the best indication of an applicant's success. It is advisable for the applicant to explain why one score is more indicative of his or her likelihood of success."

Considering the slight improvement, and Chapman's policy on the LSAT, is it worth it to reapply next cycle? My goal is to get a full-ride at Chapman. Right now I'm learning towards just attending because the score improvement was not significant. Any feedback or thoughts would be greatly appreciated and helpful. Thank you.

Redfactor

Bronze
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:52 pm

Re: 3.03 156/158

Postby Redfactor » Tue Jun 28, 2016 10:12 pm

Eeek... so many red flags.

I would strongly advise against any conditional scholarship. If Chapman is unwilling to drop the condition, it shouldn't be considered. Your two point LSAT increase bumped you from their median to their 75%, so use that as leverage to get the condition dropped. If they are not willing to drop the condition, you definitely should not enroll and reapply next cycle (and retake again for a better score).

Think about it this way: if a school is unwilling to drop scholarship conditions, then they likely don't have the money to pay out all that promised money. --> The school overextends itself knowing many scholarship will be rescinded.

Hence, over the last three years, 160 out of the 345 students that entered into law school in the exact same position that you're in have lost their scholarships. That 120k you're budgeting for law school has a 50% shot at turning into 200k. And the jobs out of Chapman, if you can get one, don't service that type of debt.

I urge you to really think about the life choices you're about to make. They don't strike me as sound.

luckboxr

New
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:34 pm

Re: 3.03 156/158

Postby luckboxr » Wed Jun 29, 2016 12:03 am

Thank you for your post, Redfactor. I agree with most of what you said, but my parents will financially support me with the rest of my tuition. Also, If I lose the scholarship, I will drop out. I will take your advice and try to negotiate with Chapman, but I don't think they will budge on the condition.

I don't get where you are getting 120k and 200k; I would never go into that much debt. I live near Chapman, so boarding expenses will not be an issue. In addition, If I'm unsuccessful in obtaining a job upon graduation, I plan on hanging up my own shingle to practice real estate, securities, and employment/labor law. I see asset bubbles forming in the real estate and security markets; I believe once I graduate—or shortly thereafter—it will be an ideal time to focus on areas of law related to those assets. How in over my head do I sound? I mean, I thought I was too pessimistic, but Redfactor makes it seem like I'm already dead. Still, I hold no illusions about my less than optimal situation.

User avatar
Nachoo2019

Silver
Posts: 798
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 2:04 pm

Re: 3.03 156/158

Postby Nachoo2019 » Wed Jun 29, 2016 12:09 am

Don't go to Chapman with a stip. they've been known to put their high scholarship students all I one section, aka section stacking, to ensure that people lose their scholarships. That's why 40%+ of their scholarships get revoked every year.


I had a 40k/year scholarship and could have lived with family at chapman but I turned it down. The section stacking is absurd and very TTT of them. There is no situation that makes chapman worth it with scholarship stips.


And all of this is not even mentioning that something like 44% of their graduates have full time legal jobs 9 months after graduation. Meaning you will have less than a coin flips chance of being a real practicing attorney within 9 months of graduation.

cavalier1138

Gold
Posts: 4955
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:01 pm

Re: 3.03 156/158

Postby cavalier1138 » Wed Jun 29, 2016 7:37 am

Basically, if your parents are paying for everything and you don't care about wasting their money, go wherever the hell you want. But as mentioned, Chapman isn't going to give you very good employment outcomes. Also, just be prepared to explain to your parents that they're now on the hook for the entire tuition bill once the scholarship goes away, because as mentioned, those scholarships are designed to be revoked.

Redfactor

Bronze
Posts: 413
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:52 pm

Re: 3.03 156/158

Postby Redfactor » Wed Jun 29, 2016 8:05 am

If you don't have to worry about the money, then it's not a bad gig. Free education, especially a law degree, a good investment.

Other than the suggestion to see if you can get the school to drop its conditions, you can disregard my previous post.

Sorry for jumping to conclusions, and I'm happy to hear you're more fiscally savvy than many.

User avatar
gsy987

Bronze
Posts: 182
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2015 8:38 pm

Re: 3.03 156/158

Postby gsy987 » Wed Jun 29, 2016 9:18 am

Redfactor wrote:If you don't have to worry about the money, then it's not a bad gig. Free education, especially a law degree, a good investment


Ehhhh... I'm not sure I agree with this, for 2 main reasons:
1. Opportunity cost: You could spend those 3 years doing a ton of other things that would produce more value than a law degree from Chapman (a school where only 52% of graduates get a degree upon graduation that requires a JD.) This is especially true if you want to work in real estate...you could get a job working in real estate during that time!
2.There's been a phenomenon that's been especially predominant lately where people w/ J.D.'s have had a very tough time getting jobs that aren't law-related...with the thinking being that "if this person is already looking at non-J.D. jobs, they must really have screwed up beforehand." Slate does a good job of detailing that here: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/cult ... annot.html

Honestly, I'd avoid Chapman like the plague....but if you're not going into significant (i.e. over 50k) debt over it, then it's not a horrible decision. Still, it doesn't seem like it'd really BENEFIT you that much.



Return to “What are my chances??

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests