3.6/167

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LcarpetronD543
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3.6/167

Postby LcarpetronD543 » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:21 pm

Any chance at the T-14? Relatively strong softs. If I stayed in school an extra semester I could probably raise my GPA up a little.

sflyr2016
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby sflyr2016 » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:23 pm

Yes. Retake and get $$.

nebula666
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby nebula666 » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:25 pm

Retake for 3 more points and go to UVA/Michigan/Duke/NU. Right now you only really have outside chances at Cornell and GULC.

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justonemoregame
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby justonemoregame » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:26 pm

If you have time to stick around for another semester, you have time to retake. A couple points could go a long way.

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jbagelboy
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby jbagelboy » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:26 pm

This is the classic example of a mylsn applicable case. The available data from the past cycles should give you a very good idea of where you'll get in - maybe with declining apps, you can be a little more optimistic.

LcarpetronD543
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby LcarpetronD543 » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:43 pm

Actually, I have many semesters to stick around. I'm only a sophomore this year and just wanted to get this out of the way early. My dream is to go to Michigan or Northwestern. You guys think a retake is the best option?

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jbagelboy
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby jbagelboy » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:50 pm

LcarpetronD543 wrote:Actually, I have many semesters to stick around. I'm only a sophomore this year and just wanted to get this out of the way early. My dream is to go to Michigan or Northwestern. You guys think a retake is the best option?


Oh god. Why the fuck would a sophomore in college take the LSAT.

Stay in school all 4 years, finish your BA with 3.75 if possible, come back to to TLS senior year when you are ready to take the LSAT seriously. Dont even think about law school for another year and a half. Come on lol. So much better shit to worry about in college.

drevo
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby drevo » Thu Jan 02, 2014 8:00 pm

jbagelboy wrote:
LcarpetronD543 wrote:Actually, I have many semesters to stick around. I'm only a sophomore this year and just wanted to get this out of the way early. My dream is to go to Michigan or Northwestern. You guys think a retake is the best option?


Oh god. Why the fuck would a sophomore in college take the LSAT.

Stay in school all 4 years, finish your BA with 3.75 if possible, come back to to TLS senior year when you are ready to take the LSAT seriously. Dont even think about law school for another year and a half. Come on lol. So much better shit to worry about in college.


This. Also you being a sophomore in college now makes your statement of "if I stayed in school an extra semester I could probably raise my GPA up a little" very weird. You have 5 semesters left (assuming no early graduation) so you have a LONG time to do more than just raise your GPA "a little." Unless you have some weird unit/pre-college situation then you have not even finished half of your college career which means your GPA is anything but set in stone.

Also, seriously go enjoy college. Sophomore year was the most fun I have ever had in my life. Took a hit GPA wise one semester in there that now makes me a reach for H and basically out at YS even with a great LSAT. But it was all worth it for the memories of stuff you get to do that you will never get the opportunity to do again.

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logical seasoning
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby logical seasoning » Fri Jan 03, 2014 4:38 pm

Personally, I became a whole lot smarter/ gained brainpower from my Sophomore year --> Senior year of college.

Also, my biggest gains from the LSAT came when I wasn't studying for it.

Long-term study for the LSAT for 2 years, retake, and get into the school of your choice.

BigZuck
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby BigZuck » Fri Jan 03, 2014 4:42 pm

I don't know what long term study for the LSAT is but whatever it is, don't do it OP

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logical seasoning
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby logical seasoning » Fri Jan 03, 2014 7:34 pm

BigZuck wrote:I don't know what long term study for the LSAT is but whatever it is, don't do it OP


I found I was better able to internalize the logic and skills needed for the LSAT when I stretched my study schedule over a longer period of time. When I felt "rushed" with a deadline of a few months before the next LSAT administration, it was harder for the material I was learning to stick.

Also, modern theory on how humans acquire information agrees that for skill based tests (LSAT) learning over a longer time period with opportunities for schematic processing is more effective than short term learning. http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~kihlstrm/GSI_2011.htm

Since OP is a Sophomore, I would love to hear your reasoning as to why long term study followed by a retake isn't a good idea

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Hitchensian
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby Hitchensian » Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:22 pm

nebula666 wrote:Retake for 3 more points and go to UVA/Michigan/Duke/NU. Right now you only really have outside chances at Cornell and GULC.


This.

BigZuck
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby BigZuck » Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:44 pm

logical seasoning wrote:
BigZuck wrote:I don't know what long term study for the LSAT is but whatever it is, don't do it OP


I found I was better able to internalize the logic and skills needed for the LSAT when I stretched my study schedule over a longer period of time. When I felt "rushed" with a deadline of a few months before the next LSAT administration, it was harder for the material I was learning to stick.

Also, modern theory on how humans acquire information agrees that for skill based tests (LSAT) learning over a longer time period with opportunities for schematic processing is more effective than short term learning. http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~kihlstrm/GSI_2011.htm

Since OP is a Sophomore, I would love to hear your reasoning as to why long term study followed by a retake isn't a good idea


The OP would be better served doing productive things like dating and making friends and honing their beer pong skills (although no alcohol until they are 21 of course) than studying for some stupid test.

3-4 months is plenty of time to study for the LSAT.

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logical seasoning
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby logical seasoning » Fri Jan 03, 2014 10:31 pm

BigZuck wrote:
logical seasoning wrote:
BigZuck wrote:I don't know what long term study for the LSAT is but whatever it is, don't do it OP


I found I was better able to internalize the logic and skills needed for the LSAT when I stretched my study schedule over a longer period of time. When I felt "rushed" with a deadline of a few months before the next LSAT administration, it was harder for the material I was learning to stick.

Also, modern theory on how humans acquire information agrees that for skill based tests (LSAT) learning over a longer time period with opportunities for schematic processing is more effective than short term learning. http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~kihlstrm/GSI_2011.htm

Since OP is a Sophomore, I would love to hear your reasoning as to why long term study followed by a retake isn't a good idea


The OP would be better served doing productive things like dating and making friends and honing their beer pong skills (although no alcohol until they are 21 of course) than studying for some stupid test.

3-4 months is plenty of time to study for the LSAT.


You are missing my point. If you approach studying for the LSAT as a long term task (a couple hours on the weekend/when you are able to), you WILL have time to do all the activities you mentioned. 3-4 months of hardcore studying during your senior year will actually a detriment to your social life, especially if you are talking about taking the June LSAT and studying over the last few months of undergrad.

Also, "3-4 months" being "plenty" of time is relative. It may have been for you, but it definitely was not for me

BigZuck
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Re: 3.6/167

Postby BigZuck » Fri Jan 03, 2014 10:52 pm

logical seasoning wrote:
BigZuck wrote:
logical seasoning wrote:
BigZuck wrote:I don't know what long term study for the LSAT is but whatever it is, don't do it OP


I found I was better able to internalize the logic and skills needed for the LSAT when I stretched my study schedule over a longer period of time. When I felt "rushed" with a deadline of a few months before the next LSAT administration, it was harder for the material I was learning to stick.

Also, modern theory on how humans acquire information agrees that for skill based tests (LSAT) learning over a longer time period with opportunities for schematic processing is more effective than short term learning. http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~kihlstrm/GSI_2011.htm

Since OP is a Sophomore, I would love to hear your reasoning as to why long term study followed by a retake isn't a good idea


The OP would be better served doing productive things like dating and making friends and honing their beer pong skills (although no alcohol until they are 21 of course) than studying for some stupid test.

3-4 months is plenty of time to study for the LSAT.


You are missing my point. If you approach studying for the LSAT as a long term task (a couple hours on the weekend/when you are able to), you WILL have time to do all the activities you mentioned. 3-4 months of hardcore studying during your senior year will actually a detriment to your social life, especially if you are talking about taking the June LSAT and studying over the last few months of undergrad.

Also, "3-4 months" being "plenty" of time is relative. It may have been for you, but it definitely was not for me


I think it's plenty for the average person.

Also, the OP should not be studying for the LSAT at any point during undergrad. K-JD is not the way to be. The best way to do it IMO is to go to school, get the best grades you can while having maximum fun, get a job for at least a couple years, study while working, and then go to law school when you're ready.

I just don't think that grinding mauve dinosaurs is the best use of one's time in UG. Way more important stuff to be focusing on.




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