Consider this.

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sesamesweets
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 05, 2013 1:17 pm

Consider this.

Postby sesamesweets » Fri Apr 05, 2013 1:28 pm

Withdrew and diferred from a school ranked 49-75 due to medical reasons. I've been battling pretty bad depression for the past year, and I have to make a decision to return to the school I previously attended or apply to other schools. The thing is, I could have easily applied to other schools at the beginning of this year and it would not have affected my differed enrollment, but I didn't.

In any case, Undergrad GPA 3.04 with an upward trend (3.5, 3.7 in last two terms). LSAC GPA 2.90. LSAT score 165. ADHD, with poor academic performance during periods of no therapy/medication.

I'd appreciate any help.
Last edited by sesamesweets on Sun Apr 14, 2013 10:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

PRgradBYU
Posts: 1419
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:04 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby PRgradBYU » Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:03 pm

*deferred

Edit: Being a dick fail.
Last edited by PRgradBYU on Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Nova
Posts: 9116
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:55 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby Nova » Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:10 pm

What exactly are you asking?

Where would you like to apply?

What is the school and COA of the school you are currently deferred at?
Last edited by Nova on Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:11 pm, edited 2 times in total.

vinnnyvincenzo
Posts: 150
Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2012 12:05 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby vinnnyvincenzo » Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:10 pm

PRgradBYU wrote:*deffered


Wanna try that one again?

PRgradBYU
Posts: 1419
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:04 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby PRgradBYU » Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:41 pm

vinnnyvincenzo wrote:
PRgradBYU wrote:*deffered


Wanna try that one again?


Haha. That's a fail if I've ever seen one, wow. My bad.

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Nova
Posts: 9116
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:55 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby Nova » Sat Apr 06, 2013 7:11 am

PRgradBYU wrote:
vinnnyvincenzo wrote:
PRgradBYU wrote:*deffered


Wanna try that one again?


Haha. That's a fail if I've ever seen one, wow. My bad.

You are not judged by the number of times you fail, but by the number of times you succeed; and the number of times you succeed is in direct proportion to the number of times you fail.

-someone else

PRgradBYU
Posts: 1419
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:04 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby PRgradBYU » Sat Apr 06, 2013 2:41 pm

Nova wrote:
PRgradBYU wrote:
vinnnyvincenzo wrote:
PRgradBYU wrote:*deffered


Wanna try that one again?


Haha. That's a fail if I've ever seen one, wow. My bad.

You are not judged by the number of times you fail, but by the number of times you succeed; and the number of times you succeed is in direct proportion to the number of times you fail.

-someone else


I dig this, especially the latter portion of the quote.

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cahwc12
Posts: 941
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 4:49 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby cahwc12 » Sat Apr 06, 2013 2:58 pm

sesamesweets wrote:Withdrew and differed from a school ranked 49-75 due to medical reasons. I've been battling pretty bad depression for the past year, and I have to make a decision to return to the school I previously attended or apply to other schools. The thing is, I could have easily applied to other schools at the beginning of this year and it would not have affected my differed enrollment, but I didn't.

In any case, Undergrad GPA 3.04 with an upward trend (3.5, 3.7 in last two terms). LSAC GPA 2.90. LSAT score 165. ADHD, with poor academic performance during periods of no therapy/medication.

I'd appreciate any help.


First, it's dubious whether you actually have ADHD, since close to 100% diagnosed with ADHD don't actually suffer from it. Second, that's not a mitigating factor for your poor performance. Your poor performance is the reason for your poor performance, so accepting responsibility is the first thing to do.

Second, a 3.5/3.7 is not really an upward trend when that is still below median for most reputable schools. The 165 is also pretty good, but you can probably do at least a little bit better, although it's unknown whether your situation calls for an improved LSAT score (probably it does).

Third, most people who don't get what they want aren't happy and end up depressed for some time. You aren't special for having depression (unless you actually have some chemical imbalance causing it rather than your environment). What makes you a successful human being is overcoming it. Everyone goes through bouts with depression because life isn't a romantic comedy.

It sounds like you still have a lot of growing up to do and you need to start accepting responsibility for the situation you put yourself in. You're ostensibly asking for advice (although you haven't actually asked any question here), but you haven't provided the necessary information yet:

1) Which school were you at? What was your discounted tuition rate, if any? Has withdrawing/deferring cost you that scholarship? What was the medical reason (if not depression)?

2) What do you want to do with your law degree? Where do you want to practice? What type of law are you interested in?

3) Do you have ties anywhere? Do you have the opportunity to work while attending a school in a certain location? Do you have the opportunity to live with family/etc somewhere that would greatly reduce your COL at a certain school?

4) How much did you prepare for the LSAT? How much do you think you could improve if you devoted serious study time over the next 2-3 or 6 months? Will the schools you can gain admission to give you additional scholarship based on this improved score or are you already over their 75th LSAT?

5) Are you giving up a job in order to go to law school? Which job? How much did it pay? Why did you leave?

Based strictly on your numbers, you probably should not attend law school anywhere unless there is a very good regional school in the area you want to practice. If there isn't, you should not go to law school. If there is, you should consider the cost of attendance and what an improved LSAT score might do for your scholarship offer.

With additional consideration of your intimated emotional maturity, you probably can find better ways to destroy your life than low six figures of non-dischargeable high-interest debt and grim employment prospects from a middling law school. You probably need to do some soul-searching, grow up, and become mentally healthy before making such a high-risk decision as going to law school.

Sorry if this isn't what you wanted to hear.

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isuperserial
Posts: 519
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:49 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby isuperserial » Sun Apr 07, 2013 2:02 am

cahwc12 wrote:
sesamesweets wrote:Withdrew and differed from a school ranked 49-75 due to medical reasons. I've been battling pretty bad depression for the past year, and I have to make a decision to return to the school I previously attended or apply to other schools. The thing is, I could have easily applied to other schools at the beginning of this year and it would not have affected my differed enrollment, but I didn't.

In any case, Undergrad GPA 3.04 with an upward trend (3.5, 3.7 in last two terms). LSAC GPA 2.90. LSAT score 165. ADHD, with poor academic performance during periods of no therapy/medication.

I'd appreciate any help.


First, it's dubious whether you actually have ADHD, since close to 100% diagnosed with ADHD don't actually suffer from it. Second, that's not a mitigating factor for your poor performance. Your poor performance is the reason for your poor performance, so accepting responsibility is the first thing to do.

Second, a 3.5/3.7 is not really an upward trend when that is still below median for most reputable schools. The 165 is also pretty good, but you can probably do at least a little bit better, although it's unknown whether your situation calls for an improved LSAT score (probably it does).

Third, most people who don't get what they want aren't happy and end up depressed for some time. You aren't special for having depression (unless you actually have some chemical imbalance causing it rather than your environment). What makes you a successful human being is overcoming it. Everyone goes through bouts with depression because life isn't a romantic comedy.

It sounds like you still have a lot of growing up to do and you need to start accepting responsibility for the situation you put yourself in. You're ostensibly asking for advice (although you haven't actually asked any question here), but you haven't provided the necessary information yet:

1) Which school were you at? What was your discounted tuition rate, if any? Has withdrawing/deferring cost you that scholarship? What was the medical reason (if not depression)?

2) What do you want to do with your law degree? Where do you want to practice? What type of law are you interested in?

3) Do you have ties anywhere? Do you have the opportunity to work while attending a school in a certain location? Do you have the opportunity to live with family/etc somewhere that would greatly reduce your COL at a certain school?

4) How much did you prepare for the LSAT? How much do you think you could improve if you devoted serious study time over the next 2-3 or 6 months? Will the schools you can gain admission to give you additional scholarship based on this improved score or are you already over their 75th LSAT?

5) Are you giving up a job in order to go to law school? Which job? How much did it pay? Why did you leave?

Based strictly on your numbers, you probably should not attend law school anywhere unless there is a very good regional school in the area you want to practice. If there isn't, you should not go to law school. If there is, you should consider the cost of attendance and what an improved LSAT score might do for your scholarship offer.

With additional consideration of your intimated emotional maturity, you probably can find better ways to destroy your life than low six figures of non-dischargeable high-interest debt and grim employment prospects from a middling law school. You probably need to do some soul-searching, grow up, and become mentally healthy before making such a high-risk decision as going to law school.

Sorry if this isn't what you wanted to hear.



Not that I explicitly disagree with any of your actual advice, but I wouldn't be so quick to diagnose ADHD, depression, or measure emotional maturity.

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jingosaur
Posts: 2207
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 10:33 am

Re: Consider this.

Postby jingosaur » Wed Apr 10, 2013 12:51 pm

Being depressed now suggests that you'll be prone to depression in the future, especially if you end up not getting a JD-required career out of Law School and graduate with 6 figures of debt that you can't default on and don't make enough money to make the interest payments on. With your current numbers, the schools that you would get into would give you a 60%+ chance of this happening. If you hit another bout of depression in Law School, those chances go up. I suggest getting to a good place emotionally, rocking the rest of undergrad at your current school or elsewhere, retaking the LSAT, and then evaluating from there. If you retake and get your score up into the 170s, then law school may become an option for you.

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paranoia4ya
Posts: 68
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2012 9:43 pm

Re: Consider this.

Postby paranoia4ya » Sat Apr 13, 2013 5:44 pm

Why are you not studying for the june LSAT! do you really want to wait another year to apply to same schools with the same stats? Pay attention when people give you advice. There is nothing to lose in your situation, it will only give you more options.




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