3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

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MLS2JD
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3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby MLS2JD » Mon Nov 22, 2010 6:34 am

I am a 25 year old (Non-URM) male with a B.S. is in Medical Laboratory Science (Formally known as Medical Technology or Clinical Laboratory Science). I also have a double minor in Chemistry and English. Although my GPA is a mere 3.4, the last 3 years ranged between 3.5-4.0 each semester. This was also on a 7 point grading scale, which is why I was still able to graduate #19 in my graduating class. I have 192 credit hours, so it is nearly impossible to bring up my cum. GPA. I also work full time as a Medical Laboratory Scientist and belong to the following organizations:

*American Society of Clinical Pathologists
*Louisiana Society of Clinical Laboratory Scientists
*Licensed/Member in good standing of The Louisiana Board of Medical Examiners
*National Credentialing Agency for Clinical Laboratory Scientists

Undergraduate Research:
*One year of undergraduate research with an emphasis in Microbiology

I also have the following softs:

*Volunteer Chemistry Tutor and Mentor
*SGA in undergrad (nothing special)
*One year internship within the Veteran's Administration Medical System, rotating through all areas of the clinical laboratory.

My LSAT of 156 is nothing to brag about, which I realize. I should have spent more time studying. Props to all of you that work full-time and still managed to take 30 practice tests! I should have did this, but never found the time.

Given my background, I am mostly interested in programs that have solid programs in IP (I qualify under Part B to take the Patent Bar) and/or Health care law. Furthermore, I am only interested in attending a school that justifies my departure from a career that currently pays me ~$60,000 a year. If I attend a school that leaves me $150,000 in debt and statistically only opens doors to jobs that pay $45-50,000/year, this would entail a loss of $180,000 (3 years salary that will be lost while attendind law school) + $150,000 (tuition), only to make less than I currently make now. Without question, choosing the wrong school could easily lead to a terrible investment! Given the circumstances, which school(s) would be the best overall investment? I realize money isn’t everything, but in this economy it has to be considered.

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FuManChusco
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby FuManChusco » Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:19 pm

I stopped reading at 156. Retake.

MLS2JD
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby MLS2JD » Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:40 pm

FuManChusco wrote:I stopped reading at 156. Retake.


My question had nothing to do with rather or not I should retake the LSAT. I am well aware of the fact that a 156 will not land me into a tier 1 law school. And yes, I am more than likely retaking the LSAT in Feb, so thanks for stating the obvious.

I am not opposed to going to a tier 2 school and/or enrolling in a part-time program like Seton Hall offers. The school is great for health care law and is relatively strong in ip as well. My numbers even reflect their class profile.

My question: Is the school worth the price tag in regards to health care or ip law?

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FuManChusco
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby FuManChusco » Mon Nov 22, 2010 2:03 pm

MLS2JD wrote:
FuManChusco wrote:I stopped reading at 156. Retake.


My question had nothing to do with rather or not I should retake the LSAT. I am well aware of the fact that a 156 will not land me into a tier 1 law school. And yes, I am more than likely retaking the LSAT in Feb, so thanks for stating the obvious.

I am not opposed to going to a tier 2 school and/or enrolling in a part-time program like Seton Hall offers. The school is great for health care law and is relatively strong in ip as well. My numbers even reflect their class profile.

My question: Is the school worth the price tag in regards to health care or ip law?


No. Hence the "retake" comment.

Underground404
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Underground404 » Mon Nov 22, 2010 2:21 pm

If you're looking at specifically health law, maybe give SLU a look. You'd certainly have a shot at getting in with your numbers...I just don't know if you'd get enough money from them to justify the cost though. That's all I can come up with though.

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im_blue
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby im_blue » Mon Nov 22, 2010 2:52 pm

MLS2JD wrote:Furthermore, I am only interested in attending a school that justifies my departure from a career that currently pays me ~$60,000 a year. If I attend a school that leaves me $150,000 in debt and statistically only opens doors to jobs that pay $45-50,000/year, this would entail a loss of $180,000 (3 years salary that will be lost while attendind law school) + $150,000 (tuition), only to make less than I currently make now.

Retake. Even if you get a full ride somewhere, you'll be looking at $45-50k jobs, which is still a net loss of at least 3 years of salary.

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FuManChusco
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby FuManChusco » Mon Nov 22, 2010 2:59 pm

im_blue wrote:
MLS2JD wrote:Furthermore, I am only interested in attending a school that justifies my departure from a career that currently pays me ~$60,000 a year. If I attend a school that leaves me $150,000 in debt and statistically only opens doors to jobs that pay $45-50,000/year, this would entail a loss of $180,000 (3 years salary that will be lost while attendind law school) + $150,000 (tuition), only to make less than I currently make now.

Retake. Even if you get a full ride somewhere, you'll be looking at $45-50k jobs, which is still a net loss of at least 3 years of salary.


TITCR

whymeohgodno
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby whymeohgodno » Mon Nov 22, 2010 3:01 pm

Don't go with that LSAT...seriously.

Gatorbull84
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Gatorbull84 » Tue Nov 23, 2010 10:12 am

I could be wrong but I was under the impression that for IP law you have to be an engineer or have a PhD in a hard science. If I am wrong take a look at Franklin Pierce.

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Patriot1208
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Patriot1208 » Tue Nov 23, 2010 10:18 am

Gatorbull84 wrote:I could be wrong but I was under the impression that for IP law you have to be an engineer or have a PhD in a hard science. If I am wrong take a look at Franklin Pierce.


You are conflating IP with patent. There is "soft" IP that doesn't require sciences. But "soft" IP is generally a practice at a biglaw firm like kirkland so it's hard to get into.

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Patriot1208
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Patriot1208 » Tue Nov 23, 2010 10:19 am

Underground404 wrote:If you're looking at specifically health law, maybe give SLU a look. You'd certainly have a shot at getting in with your numbers...I just don't know if you'd get enough money from them to justify the cost though. That's all I can come up with though.


Do not go to SLU unless you are comfortable living within a 25 mile radius around St. Louis your whole life.

ThundercatsRinnocent
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby ThundercatsRinnocent » Wed Nov 24, 2010 11:57 pm

FuManChusco wrote:I stopped reading at 156. Retake.


Whoa... you need to calm down there, buddy....

GrapeApe
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby GrapeApe » Thu Nov 25, 2010 1:33 am

Dude, you have to remember that for most of the ignorant elitists that post here, they only think in terms of OH NOEZ!!!!!!!! BIG LAWZ OR BUSTZ!!!!!!!!!!!!

Granted, if you want to work in a Big Law firm, then you absolutely need to work for a higher LSAT and apply to a school that the elitist ivory tower pieces of filth will hire you from. (Never-mind that the ignorant hacks that infest such places aren't nearly as smart as they think that they are.)

However, for some people, going to law school for FREE at a lower ranked school can make a great deal of sense. Think about this, even if you do manage to get in at sticker price to one of the OH NOEZ!!!! BIG NAME SKOOLS!!!!!! you will HAVE to find a job in BigLaw in order to pay down your $180,000 debt that you will accrue during your time in school. If that kind of work is your idea of fun, (Ie: 80-100 hour weeks, no family life, no social life, stuck in an urban cesspool with a bunch of ignorant libtard elites who think they know better than the rest of the world) then by all means, retake the LSAT.

However, with your numbers, you can get a FREE RIDE at a lower ranked school, and then you can comfortably work in a field of law where you will actually have a life outside the job.

For some people, getting a free J.D. from a lower ranked school is a far better option than getting a sticker J.D. at a T14. EVERYONE'S SITUATION IS DIFFERENT, so don't let these people tell you how to live your life.

I took the latter option because it fit my situation. I also turned down law review, refused any extra-curricular activities, and work after classes. (Posters here will tell you that all of the above are death-blows, and OH NOEZ!!!! YOU CAN'T RECOVER FROM THESE DECISIONS!!!!!). Yet strangely enough, I had many opportunities fall into my lap, such as an internship at a major U.S. Attorney's Office (which I also turned down).

The only things that I have learned in law school are that elitist morons don't know nearly as much as they think that they do, and the law is nothing more than the raw exercise of power that a trained monkey could do.

Joymin
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Joymin » Thu Nov 25, 2010 1:57 am

GrapeApe –

Ahem! Ahem!

Joymin
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Joymin » Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:23 am

Hi all,

I tend to lean towards the conclusion of taking a full ride at a lower-ranked school.

A lot of people have expressed their opinion that it is important, especially in this economy, to get a high LSAT and to go to a high-ranking school no matter what debt you accumulate. Let us not deny that your LSAT and your school‘s tag do follow you in your career well past graduation. However, I have seen instances where people have done well in their respective domains through sheer energy, dynamism, and hard work. Also, remember that in this particular case, the applicant has a science degree already. And because he needs a break in to IP law, he is going for a second degree which will help him.

Look at the IP-wise rankings of J.D. programs at:

http://www.patentlyo.com/patent/2010/04 ... grams.html

All the best with your applications. Apply to lower-ranked schools and keep them as your safety net. Do take your LSAT more seriously, and managed to get several points higher otherwise it won't look good. I took all preptests while I was working full-time and six-day weeks. I managed a score that is only 4 points above yours. Trust me, it is tough, because LSAT is about mental efficiency more than raw intelligence. I suggest you put an addendum to explain your LSAT.

Best,
Joymin

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ResolutePear
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby ResolutePear » Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:37 am

Joymin wrote:Hi all,

I tend to lean towards the conclusion of taking a full ride at a lower-ranked school.

A lot of people have expressed their opinion that it is important, especially in this economy, to get a high LSAT and to go to a high-ranking school no matter what debt you accumulate. Let us not deny that your LSAT and your school‘s tag do follow you in your career well past graduation. However, I have seen instances where people have done well in their respective domains through sheer energy, dynamism, and hard work. Also, remember that in this particular case, the applicant has a science degree already. And because he needs a break in to IP law, he is going for a second degree which will help him.

Look at the IP-wise rankings of J.D. programs at:

http://www.patentlyo.com/patent/2010/04 ... grams.html

All the best with your applications. Apply to lower-ranked schools and keep them as your safety net. Do take your LSAT more seriously, and managed to get several points higher otherwise it won't look good. I took all preptests while I was working full-time and six-day weeks. I managed a score that is only 4 points above yours. Trust me, it is tough, because LSAT is about mental efficiency more than raw intelligence. I suggest you put an addendum to explain your LSAT.

Best,
Joymin


Horrible, horrible advice - imo. Taking this advice would literally fuck you in the ass with no lube.. for life!

Do you know why people pay assloads of cash to get into Harvard when a TTT teaches you *THE SAME EXACT THING*?

Well, I'm not saying. This should be obvious by now. Besides, most of the schools on that list fall in T-14 anyways.

Retake.

thegor1987
Posts: 323
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby thegor1987 » Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:47 am

GrapeApe wrote:Dude, you have to remember that for most of the ignorant elitists that post here, they only think in terms of OH NOEZ!!!!!!!! BIG LAWZ OR BUSTZ!!!!!!!!!!!!

Granted, if you want to work in a Big Law firm, then you absolutely need to work for a higher LSAT and apply to a school that the elitist ivory tower pieces of filth will hire you from. (Never-mind that the ignorant hacks that infest such places aren't nearly as smart as they think that they are.)

However, for some people, going to law school for FREE at a lower ranked school can make a great deal of sense. Think about this, even if you do manage to get in at sticker price to one of the OH NOEZ!!!! BIG NAME SKOOLS!!!!!! you will HAVE to find a job in BigLaw in order to pay down your $180,000 debt that you will accrue during your time in school. If that kind of work is your idea of fun, (Ie: 80-100 hour weeks, no family life, no social life, stuck in an urban cesspool with a bunch of ignorant libtard elites who think they know better than the rest of the world) then by all means, retake the LSAT.

However, with your numbers, you can get a FREE RIDE at a lower ranked school, and then you can comfortably work in a field of law where you will actually have a life outside the job.

For some people, getting a free J.D. from a lower ranked school is a far better option than getting a sticker J.D. at a T14. EVERYONE'S SITUATION IS DIFFERENT, so don't let these people tell you how to live your life.

I took the latter option because it fit my situation. I also turned down law review, refused any extra-curricular activities, and work after classes. (Posters here will tell you that all of the above are death-blows, and OH NOEZ!!!! YOU CAN'T RECOVER FROM THESE DECISIONS!!!!!). Yet strangely enough, I had many opportunities fall into my lap, such as an internship at a major U.S. Attorney's Office (which I also turned down).

The only things that I have learned in law school are that elitist morons don't know nearly as much as they think that they do, and the law is nothing more than the raw exercise of power that a trained monkey could do.


+1

so many elitist douchebags on here it's nice to hear these kinds of rants now and again.

To the OP, since you are taking out a loan to pay for law school, a good option might be going to a regional state school where you could acquire instate tuition after one year. UF, Arizona State, for example. This is one of the best ways that you could minimize your debt. Good luck on your retake!

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clintonius
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby clintonius » Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:49 am

Yeah, what are the odds of landing a full ride anywhere with those numbers? I honestly don't know and am just kind of curious.

cartercl
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby cartercl » Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:52 am

MLS2JD wrote:I am only interested in attending a school that justifies my departure from a career that currently pays me ~$60,000 a year. If I attend a school that leaves me $150,000 in debt and statistically only opens doors to jobs that pay $45-50,000/year, this would entail a loss of $180,000 (3 years salary that will be lost while attendind law school) + $150,000 (tuition), only to make less than I currently make now. Without question, choosing the wrong school could easily lead to a terrible investment! Given the circumstances, which school(s) would be the best overall investment? I realize money isn’t everything, but in this economy it has to be considered.


Sounds like you want to have your cake and eat it too. You either score higher than 156 on your retake to improve your chances of making the salary that you want so that law school will at least seem more like a calculated risk than a gamble, or you accept that with your current circumstances it is better for you to continue with the career you currently have. So... will it be the red pill or the blue pill?

Oh, and BTW... I'm not an elitist. Just going with the sound logic on this one.

cartercl
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby cartercl » Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:55 am

thegor1987 wrote:+1

so many elitist douchebags on here it's nice to hear these kinds of rants now and again.

To the OP, since you are taking out a loan to pay for law school, a good option might be going to a regional state school where you could acquire instate tuition after one year. UF, Arizona State, for example. This is one of the best ways that you could minimize your debt. Good luck on your retake!


You know what, being an elitist is one thing. But giving poor advice is another. Why don't you also inform the OP of the barriers to acquiring in-state tuition. You can start by stating the obvious: It's a bitch.

Joymin
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Joymin » Thu Nov 25, 2010 3:01 am

ResolutePear wrote:
Joymin wrote:


Horrible, horrible advice - imo. Taking this advice would literally fuck you in the ass with no lube.. for life!

Do you know why people pay assloads of cash to get into Harvard when a TTT teaches you *THE SAME EXACT THING*?

Well, I'm not saying. This should be obvious by now. Besides, most of the schools on that list fall in T-14 anyways.

Retake.


A degree from Tier 1 is no guarantee towards getting to spend your retirement years on an expensive yacht in the Cayman Islands. I have known people coming out of places like the GWU and getting into an area totally different from what they wanted to (like brainless document review jobs).

DON”T GET CARRIED AWAY BY THESE RANKING SYSTEMS.

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Lawl Shcool
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby Lawl Shcool » Thu Nov 25, 2010 3:12 am

I was close to your numbers (3.2/156) and the best offers I got were 1/2 rides to Tier 3/4 schools. If you want a full-ride you're going to need to retake, as much as that sucks.

I wish I had.

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ResolutePear
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby ResolutePear » Thu Nov 25, 2010 3:14 am

Joymin wrote:
ResolutePear wrote:
Joymin wrote:


Horrible, horrible advice - imo. Taking this advice would literally fuck you in the ass with no lube.. for life!

Do you know why people pay assloads of cash to get into Harvard when a TTT teaches you *THE SAME EXACT THING*?

Well, I'm not saying. This should be obvious by now. Besides, most of the schools on that list fall in T-14 anyways.

Retake.


A degree from Tier 1 is no guarantee towards getting to spend your retirement years on an expensive yacht in the Cayman Islands. I have known people coming out of places like the GWU and getting into an area totally different from what they wanted to (like brainless document review jobs).

DON”T GET CARRIED AWAY BY THESE RANKING SYSTEMS.


I'm not trying to be elitist here -

You're right. So, if T1 isn't a guarantee - then where does that put lower ranked schools?

thegor1987
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby thegor1987 » Thu Nov 25, 2010 3:17 am

cartercl wrote:
thegor1987 wrote:+1

so many elitist douchebags on here it's nice to hear these kinds of rants now and again.

To the OP, since you are taking out a loan to pay for law school, a good option might be going to a regional state school where you could acquire instate tuition after one year. UF, Arizona State, for example. This is one of the best ways that you could minimize your debt. Good luck on your retake!


You know what, being an elitist is one thing. But giving poor advice is another. Why don't you also inform the OP of the barriers to acquiring in-state tuition. You can start by stating the obvious: It's a bitch.


Why is it 'a bitch'?

cartercl
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Re: 3.41/156 /3 Years Experience As A Medical Lab Scientist

Postby cartercl » Thu Nov 25, 2010 3:24 am

thegor1987 wrote:
cartercl wrote:
thegor1987 wrote:+1

so many elitist douchebags on here it's nice to hear these kinds of rants now and again.

To the OP, since you are taking out a loan to pay for law school, a good option might be going to a regional state school where you could acquire instate tuition after one year. UF, Arizona State, for example. This is one of the best ways that you could minimize your debt. Good luck on your retake!


You know what, being an elitist is one thing. But giving poor advice is another. Why don't you also inform the OP of the barriers to acquiring in-state tuition. You can start by stating the obvious: It's a bitch.


Why is it 'a bitch'?


From UF's website:

A legal resident or resident is a person who has maintained his or her residence in this state for the preceding year, has purchased a home which is occupied by him or her as his or her residence, or has established a domicile in this state pursuant to Florida State Statute, 222.17.

However, a resident for tuition purposes is a person who qualifies as provided in state statute, F.S. 1009.21, for the in-state tuition rate; a nonresident for tuition purposes is a person who does not qualify for the in-state tuition rate. It is possible to be both a legal resident of the state and a nonresident for tuition purposes concurrently.

The independent student who is claiming residency must show that their residency in the state was not merely temporary or incidental to enrolling at the institution of higher education. Living in or attending school in Florida will not, in itself, establish legal residence for tuition purposes.

......

Florida residency for tuition purposes is based solely on an independent claimant. If a student is dependent as per federal tax law, then the parent or legal guardian becomes the claimant, and residency for tuition purposes is based on that parent or legal guardian. If a student is independent as per federal tax law, the student is the claimant and residency for tuition purposes is based on the student. In most cases, copies of federal income tax returns are required to substantiate dependent or independent status. Further criteria for determining dependency can be found in section 3.0 of the Residency Guidelines.

Florida statute requires the claimant (the person claiming residency) to be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident alien or other legal alien granted indefinite stay by DHS. The claimant must establish and maintain a legal Florida residence for at least 12 months prior to the first day of classes in the semester for which in-state residency status is sought. The 12-month qualifying period requires documentary evidence of residence as requested by the appropriate university official. Examples of relevant documentation may be found on the residency reclassification request form. Further criteria on documentary evidence can be found in section 4.8 of the Residency Guidelines.

In addition to the claimant's requisite 12-month residency in the state of Florida, an independent student claiming residency for tuition purposes must also show that their presence in the state was not merely temporary or incidental to enrolling at the institution of higher education. Additional evidence or documentation will be required for meeting this requirement of reclassification. This requirement must be satisfied in order to obtain residency for tuition purposes. Such documentation is described in section 5.2 of the Residency Guidelines.


etc, etc... Ain't that a bitch?




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