Biomedical Patent Law

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qualski
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Biomedical Patent Law

Postby qualski » Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:42 am

I am a severe splitter. 2.2 , 175+. However, my major is biomedical engineering at cornell. I am wondering if this will have a positive effect on my app in the eyes of the adcomm. Also, I am interested in patent law. Is there a benefit to going to a school known for being highly ranked in this, such as univ of houston or santa clara? I know I have zero chance of a top 14 but I would like to go to the best school possible. Additionally I do have a scientific publication and >18 months work experience in various internships. What schools should I apply to and might I have a reasonable chance of acceptance? There is no data for my stats online. I do have a phd position available to me if I can't get into a good enough law school, but I'm more interested in patent law. Thanks for the help :)

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BigFatPanda
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby BigFatPanda » Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:52 am

You have no shot at top 6 schools but i won't say T14 would shut u out: Northwestern may take you. If you are VA resident, UVA may take you. In any event, its too late this cycle, apply at the earliest for next cycle.

I think you should take the PhD before going to law school because:

1. anything bio-related requires a PhD to do patent stuff.
2. I don't see how u could put up with another three years of engineering PhD after three years of law.

I think there is a benefit going to law schools that are highly ranked in IP if you want to practice in it because:

1. if you're seriously interested in IP (on top of wanting to make a lot of dough), going to school that are IP oriented will simulate your intellectual growth via your interaction with like-minded professors.
2. These schools may offer more scholarship than "higher ranked" schools in the top 50s range.

qualski
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby qualski » Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:56 am

That is helpful. A phd is not required for patent law though, just a bachelors is enough as far as I have read from many sources. I am interested beyond the money but it definitely doesn't hurt ;)

qualski
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby qualski » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:04 pm

What makes you think I have a chance at northwestern? they're median gpa seems pretty high...

09042014
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby 09042014 » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:12 pm

qualski wrote:What makes you think I have a chance at northwestern? they're median gpa seems pretty high...


Someone with your GPA and a lower LSAT got in via ED this year. But that person had post college work experience. You should ask around to see if you can realistically get patent law with your degree. I hear its tough for bio.

You've got a shot at at partial scholarships at Illinois, Minnesota, Wustl, Indiana, and Iowa as well.

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BigFatPanda
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby BigFatPanda » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:17 pm

qualski wrote:That is helpful. A phd is not required for patent law though, just a bachelors is enough as far as I have read from many sources. I am interested beyond the money but it definitely doesn't hurt ;)


It is one thing to pass the patent bar (yes, a BS would suffice), its quite another thing to get a job. To my best understanding, EE (like me) and CE will only need a BS to practice before the PTO AND a BS is sufficient to get hire by law firms if they have a law degree and has decent class ranks (top %50). For biology related stuff, a PhD is usually required by law firms who are hiring.

jerjon2
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby jerjon2 » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:23 pm

BigFatPanda wrote:
qualski wrote:That is helpful. A phd is not required for patent law though, just a bachelors is enough as far as I have read from many sources. I am interested beyond the money but it definitely doesn't hurt ;)


It is one thing to pass the patent bar (yes, a BS would suffice), its quite another thing to get a job. To my best understanding, EE (like me) and CE will only need a BS to practice before the PTO AND a BS is sufficient to get hire by law firms if they have a law degree and has decent class ranks (top %50). For biology related stuff, a PhD is usually required by law firms who are hiring.


I'm not sure about Cornell but at Ga. Tech. BME undergrad is a mixture of ME/ECE/ChemE much more so than it is straight Bio (At least according to the people I've spoken to). Also, people that I know in BME say that the focus is very different at different schools. I'm not sure how or if this affects how hiring partners view patent attorney's with BME backgrounds.

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Big Shrimpin
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby Big Shrimpin » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:31 pm

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Last edited by Big Shrimpin on Sat Jul 31, 2010 10:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

qualski
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby qualski » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:33 pm

Desert Fox wrote:Someone with your GPA and a lower LSAT got in via ED this year. But that person had post college work experience.


Forgive me, but what does ED stand for? I know in the biological sense, but not in the law sense.

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UFMatt
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby UFMatt » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:34 pm

Patent law for bio is not impossible with just a bachelors, but it will be an uphill struggle. You'll be competing with PhDs for jobs. If you can highlight some non-bio engineering skills, then your chances should improve.

ED = early decision.

jerjon2
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby jerjon2 » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:51 pm

UFMatt wrote:Patent law for bio is not impossible with just a bachelors, but it will be an uphill struggle. You'll be competing with PhDs for jobs. If you can highlight some non-bio engineering skills, then your chances should improve.

ED = early decision.


It may help if you could highlight some expertise in a BME sub discipline that is atypical or more useful than the PhDs you may have to compete with. It may help you if that sub discipline expertise is in something more ECE related. (I'm speculating based on the relative demands of the disciplines that BME draws from and I have no substantive evidence) I know for instance one of my best friends is a PhD student in BME and most of his work is ME stuff and most of the people he knows lean more towards ChemE stuff so it may be feasible to differentiate yourself. Good luck with everything.

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matrix637
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Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby matrix637 » Mon Mar 15, 2010 12:52 pm

BigFatPanda wrote:You have no shot at top 6 schools but i won't say T14 would shut u out: Northwestern may take you. If you are VA resident, UVA may take you. In any event, its too late this cycle, apply at the earliest for next cycle.

I think you should take the PhD before going to law school because:

1. anything bio-related requires a PhD to do patent stuff.
2. I don't see how u could put up with another three years of engineering PhD after three years of law.

I think there is a benefit going to law schools that are highly ranked in IP if you want to practice in it because:

1. if you're seriously interested in IP (on top of wanting to make a lot of dough), going to school that are IP oriented will simulate your intellectual growth via your interaction with like-minded professors.
2. These schools may offer more scholarship than "higher ranked" schools in the top 50s range.


anything bio-related does not require a PhD to do patent stuff. It depends on the specific biomedical engineering program you are enrolled at. I am not sure how Cornell's program works but in UT we had different tracks, including an instrumentation and imaging track which was basically EE but with more emphasis on medical devices and imaging modalities. Try to get as much engineering experience as possible, take the patent bar as soon as you can and possibly look for some sort of experience as a patent agent. Also try http://www.intelproplaw.com

qualski
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:29 am

Re: Biomedical Patent Law

Postby qualski » Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:47 pm

I have decided to go the PhD, J.D. route. Just curious what law schools will think of my application in 2015 with the same stats but the addition of the PhD GPA that will be 3.5-4.0. Does graduate GPA (or additional publications) factor in at all? Have to admit the 8 years of additional schooling is a bit daunting, but I am willing to do it. Looking at the job applications for biotech patent attorneys, most are looking for a PhD.




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