What are good "softs"?

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gatorlion
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Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:23 am

Re: What are good "softs"?

Postby gatorlion » Sat Feb 13, 2010 2:19 pm

Halibut6 wrote:
Spaceman Spiff wrote:
holydonkey wrote:a graduate degree with a high gpa. foreign language fluency. some schools like community service.


Is it really possible that a grad degree with a high GPA matters? It would be nice; I have an MA in Constitutional Law Studies with a 3.9 GPA. I was told repeatedly that it wouldn't matter, which is fine because I wasn't thinking about law school applications so much as wanting to study something I was interested in.


I think most grad degrees are meh for law school, but yours will actually probably be a considerable benefit to you. Kudos.


If you're MA is in a cognate discipline to what you intend to practice FTW =)

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Zapatero
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Re: What are good "softs"?

Postby Zapatero » Sat Feb 13, 2010 5:04 pm

Xiaolong wrote:
ccs1702 wrote:
Spaceman Spiff wrote:
holydonkey wrote:a graduate degree with a high gpa. foreign language fluency. some schools like community service.


Is it really possible that a grad degree with a high GPA matters? It would be nice; I have an MA in Constitutional Law Studies with a 3.9 GPA. I was told repeatedly that it wouldn't matter, which is fine because I wasn't thinking about law school applications so much as wanting to study something I was interested in.


No. Everybody has a graduate degree, and everybody speaks a foreign language. Only truly extraordinary things will give you a significant bump.



Americans tend to claim fluency in a foreign language when they can order a cup of coffee and tell the cab driver the way home. As such, I think actual fluency in a foreign language is a good soft that certainly not everyone has as opposed to the two-semesters-in-college fluency.

By the way cool pic - I like Mr. Bean.


I totally agree. I've heard countless stories of getting fluent during spring semester abroad. Still, law schools don't really verify your command of the language and pretty much have to take you at your word, so it's hard to distinguish between legitimate bilingual speakers and people like that.

Also, it's not Mr. Bean. Not sure if that was a joke or not. It's Spanish Prime Minister Zapatero.

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Zapatero
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Re: What are good "softs"?

Postby Zapatero » Sat Feb 13, 2010 5:11 pm

gatorlion wrote:
ccs1702 wrote:
Spaceman Spiff wrote:
holydonkey wrote:a graduate degree with a high gpa. foreign language fluency. some schools like community service.


Is it really possible that a grad degree with a high GPA matters? It would be nice; I have an MA in Constitutional Law Studies with a 3.9 GPA. I was told repeatedly that it wouldn't matter, which is fine because I wasn't thinking about law school applications so much as wanting to study something I was interested in.


No. Everybody has a graduate degree, and everybody speaks a foreign language. Only truly extraordinary things will give you a significant bump.


If by everyone you mean a max of 20% of the matriculants at any given law school. LOLZ


Clearly I didn't mean everyone. Even if it's only 20%, a soft shared by 1 of every 5 people is certainly not extraordinary. I'm pretty sure OP wanted to hear about game-changing softs, like ninja and Ghostbuster. However, I admit that I totally overlooked the MA mentioned above; that might actually help you out.

Eieio
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Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2010 12:32 pm

Re: What are good "softs"?

Postby Eieio » Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:56 am

Veyron wrote:
holydonkey wrote: a doctorate [strike]graduate degree with a high gpa. foreign language fluency. some schools like community service.[/[/strike]quote]

FTFY


Have a doctorate in a language heavy discipline (5 languages not including english); splitter on LSAT/GPA.

While I can't be certain, my experience so far leads me to believe that the grad degree and work experience has kept me on WLs at schools I should have been rejected from based on my ungrad GPA.

Dunno if that information is useful to anyone. And, hey, my speculation could be completely off the mark.