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Re: How to Do a Law School Visit

Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:49 am
by floatie
cam1992 wrote:This week I will be visiting a law school that I am wait listed at. I am fitting the visit in between a work trip, so I will not have any time other than the official visit and a class visit. Just wondering, is there anyone who should receive a thank-you note after my visit? I haven't sent any letters to other tour guides (all students), but I am extra curious because I am hoping to get off of the waitlist! Thanks.


Did you talk to any of the admissions people, even momentarily? If so, direct it to them. If not, send one to the general admissions email

Re: How to Do a Law School Visit

Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:23 am
by landshoes
KissMyAxe wrote:You're overthinking this. Do NOT wear a suit or coat if you're sitting in on classes. At least at my school, I've seen one student wear a suit at any point (he was in charge of the moot court intro meeting). No one's going to be impressed with your suit, and it might weird some of your potential future classmates out. Just wear whatever is comfortable to you. A button down and khakis is obviously fine, but a polo is not dressed down. Hell, for my tour of my school, I was recovering from some surgery, so comfort was of upmost importance to me, and I wore a tshirt, basketball shorts, and sockless moccasins. I had a great conversation with the dean and the admissions officers and it obviously didn't affect my admission. I know it's normal for law applicants to be neurotic over everything, but really, no one cares or will remember what you were wearing. Just don't worry about it.

I also would not bring a resume. If they wanted one, they'd ask for it. And if you've already applied, they have your file right by their desk anyway.
It's just really weird to walk in holding your resume


Outed as a Yalie

Seriously though, a sport coat would be totally appropriate at my school. As would a polo and chinos, jeans and a sweater, whatever. A full suit would be an outlier for a visiting student but I don't think it would look crazy or anything. (We have students in suits at various times and our profs suit up to teach.) But a suit is definitely not necessary so if you don't love your suit there is no need at all. CAVEAT: if you're doing an official admissions interview (instead of just a visit) it's worth caring but I couldn't say what exactly they want you to wear. Our interviews are all on skype, but you'd want to be wearing business for them.

Having a resume handy seems smart and normal. Store it in a folder and don't whip it out unless you're being evaluated by an interviewer and discussing your qualifications (not just chatting about the school).

In terms of visiting classes, be polite and respectful and err on the side of being quiet and unobtrusive. Like, don't talk in class unless the prof asks for volunteers and calls on you, don't interrupt, don't be loud. Do feel free to chat with students as they're leaving if they look open to it. If they're not in a hurry, it's a good way to get questions answered by people who aren't in admissions.

Re: How to Do a Law School Visit

Posted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:10 pm
by KissMyAxe
landshoes wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:You're overthinking this. Do NOT wear a suit or coat if you're sitting in on classes. At least at my school, I've seen one student wear a suit at any point (he was in charge of the moot court intro meeting). No one's going to be impressed with your suit, and it might weird some of your potential future classmates out. Just wear whatever is comfortable to you. A button down and khakis is obviously fine, but a polo is not dressed down. Hell, for my tour of my school, I was recovering from some surgery, so comfort was of upmost importance to me, and I wore a tshirt, basketball shorts, and sockless moccasins. I had a great conversation with the dean and the admissions officers and it obviously didn't affect my admission. I know it's normal for law applicants to be neurotic over everything, but really, no one cares or will remember what you were wearing. Just don't worry about it.

I also would not bring a resume. If they wanted one, they'd ask for it. And if you've already applied, they have your file right by their desk anyway.
It's just really weird to walk in holding your resume


Outed as a Yalie

Seriously though, a sport coat would be totally appropriate at my school. As would a polo and chinos, jeans and a sweater, whatever. A full suit would be an outlier for a visiting student but I don't think it would look crazy or anything. (We have students in suits at various times and our profs suit up to teach.) But a suit is definitely not necessary so if you don't love your suit there is no need at all. CAVEAT: if you're doing an official admissions interview (instead of just a visit) it's worth caring but I couldn't say what exactly they want you to wear. Our interviews are all on skype, but you'd want to be wearing business for them.

Having a resume handy seems smart and normal. Store it in a folder and don't whip it out unless you're being evaluated by an interviewer and discussing your qualifications (not just chatting about the school).

In terms of visiting classes, be polite and respectful and err on the side of being quiet and unobtrusive. Like, don't talk in class unless the prof asks for volunteers and calls on you, don't interrupt, don't be loud. Do feel free to chat with students as they're leaving if they look open to it. If they're not in a hurry, it's a good way to get questions answered by people who aren't in admissions.


Haha, I didn't think it was a secret. But of course Chicago students would be the ones with a sports coat or even suits and carrying folders filled with resumes looking like douches. :P

But I will absolutely agree that admitted students shouldn't be speaking in classes. I've never experienced that, but I can't imagine it would go over well anywhere. Be a fly on the wall unless you're directly called on. I wouldn't even raise your hand if they want volunteers. They want THEIR students to volunteer, the people who have the background on the case. Just sit there, not that difficult. But yeah, don't be offended if students don't have the time to talk, since many have to leave for another class, but by all means chat with them if they're amenable. Admissions is always going to lie to you, but students will tend to be more honest.