Brown Shoes

(Where, When and What Did You Think)
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James Bond
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Re: Brown Shoes

Postby James Bond » Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:20 am

I'm really impressed with DKNY shoes. I bought a pair for dress and a pair for going out with jeans or dockers, and both look and fit great.

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Tweek
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 1:34 am

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby Tweek » Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:04 pm

In my years of post-college work, I've come to appreciate the durability of Johnston & Murphy. I have a pair of Bally shoes that I bought at the same time as a pair of J&M (very similar construction/type of shoe). With the same mileage, the Bally shoes show a lot more wear.

LegalGENius
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 2:55 pm

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby LegalGENius » Fri Mar 26, 2010 12:13 pm

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Last edited by LegalGENius on Fri Mar 26, 2010 12:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

LegalGENius
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Re: Brown Shoes

Postby LegalGENius » Fri Mar 26, 2010 12:19 pm

Cole S. Law wrote:If you want to be a professional attorney and you're not Gerry Spence, get used to the idea of black shoes. Whenever I see someone wearing brown shoes with a gray or black suit, I think they either clueless, don't care, or unbelievably cheap. There are plenty of reasonably priced shoes on zappos.com that will pass muster in all but the snootiest of firms. Even in the snootiest surroundings, inexpensive black shoes will look better than brown.



This is very true. Also, if you are going for a more formal look, your shoes should have laces. Men, you should have a navy blue and a dark charcoal suit while in law school (at least twos suits in all). If you have the means, get an additional black suit. It is pretty well accepted theory that black is a very strong color for men to wear in an interview, so brown or navy is a safer bet. Unless of course you are trying to send a very strong message!

Also, PINSTRIPES are a NO at most conservative firms. Unless they are very and I mean VERY subtle! Also, you probably know to stay away from loud shirts/ties (no purple, bright pink, or other crazy colors that Express retails, etc.) but I still feel like I have to say that.

jrs12
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2008 1:47 am

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby jrs12 » Thu Apr 15, 2010 7:49 am

Cole S. Law wrote:If you want to be a professional attorney and you're not Gerry Spence, get used to the idea of black shoes. Whenever I see someone wearing brown shoes with a gray or black suit, I think they either clueless, don't care, or unbelievably cheap. There are plenty of reasonably priced shoes on zappos.com that will pass muster in all but the snootiest of firms. Even in the snootiest surroundings, inexpensive black shoes will look better than brown.

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The really clueless people are the ones who wear black suits at all.

It is true that low quality shows more in brown shoes than in black, but it doesn't make that big of a difference. Anyone who's been dressing professionally for a few years can identify cheap shoes instantly.

Brown shoes go very well with grey, though. With a light, heather grey, english tan looks excellent. With darker greys, oxblood or dark brown work well. You need to pay a little attention to the customs in your city and firm, however. In some cities, light tan is considered effete. In others, it is considered a sign of taste. Surprisingly, tan seems more common in NY than LA. Cordovan is safe pretty much anywhere.

I can recommend these shoes without reservation: http://canvas.landsend.com/pp/MacNeilWi ... igin=index
This dark brown will be versatile. The shoes are high quality, should last at least a decade, and they project an adult image.

All this said, while I have strong opinions about clothing and shoes, you really have to screw up to have someone hold it against you. Most of my classmates have worn suits only a handful of times. Interviewers know this. They also know that students don't have a lot of disposable income to spend at Brooks Brothers or Neiman's. They probably remember the way that they dressed at interviews and can sympathize. They know that when you're exposed to the firm's culture on a daily basis, and when you're being paid enough, you'll have no trouble dressing the part. Do your best, but don't be insecure about how you're dressed. When you're actually interviewing, you shouldn't be thinking about your clothes or shoes at all. (This is the secret to wearing suits well. When you've worn them every day for years, you forget that you're wearing them. They become like jeans. This is the difference between wearing your clothes and being worn by them.)

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CaptainSnuggleBunny
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Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2008 9:06 pm

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby CaptainSnuggleBunny » Thu Apr 15, 2010 8:06 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jb6pEQM2PUY


When I go downtown
I always wear a corduroy suit
cause it's made of a hundred gutters
that the rain can run right through

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174
Posts: 183
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 4:03 am

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby 174 » Thu Apr 15, 2010 8:30 am

Steven Perry wrote:
biv0ns wrote:
letsdoit1982 wrote:Does anyone know if double vents on the back of suit jackets are acceptable for interviews (and law in general), or are they a bit too trendy?


They are acceptable.

And GQ is not how anyone going into law should aspire to dress. we've been over that many times as well.


GQ, while not the Bible on fashion, can teach even a fashion-challenged individual the dynamics of the art form. We all have different body shapes, and it helps to know how to dress in order to not accent any abnormalities. For instance, I'm very short, therefore there are certain techniques I can use to make myself seem taller. Pinstripes, more form fitting clothing, various tie patterns, ect, will take the focus off of height and make my body appear more normal. Dressing to impress is much more complex than one would imagine. The magazine isn't just a large Dolce & Gabanna add; there are some generally timeless fashion techniques they cover that any man should master. I've personally found that magazine to be quite helpful in building a good base of fashion knowledge. Where you decide to go from there is all up to personal preference.

+1

sailgclass
Posts: 33
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:33 pm

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby sailgclass » Thu Apr 15, 2010 9:50 am

jrs12 wrote:
Cole S. Law wrote:If you want to be a professional attorney and you're not Gerry Spence, get used to the idea of black shoes. Whenever I see someone wearing brown shoes with a gray or black suit, I think they either clueless, don't care, or unbelievably cheap. There are plenty of reasonably priced shoes on zappos.com that will pass muster in all but the snootiest of firms. Even in the snootiest surroundings, inexpensive black shoes will look better than brown.

--ImageRemoved--


The really clueless people are the ones who wear black suits at all.

It is true that low quality shows more in brown shoes than in black, but it doesn't make that big of a difference. Anyone who's been dressing professionally for a few years can identify cheap shoes instantly.

Brown shoes go very well with grey, though. With a light, heather grey, english tan looks excellent. With darker greys, oxblood or dark brown work well. You need to pay a little attention to the customs in your city and firm, however. In some cities, light tan is considered effete. In others, it is considered a sign of taste. Surprisingly, tan seems more common in NY than LA. Cordovan is safe pretty much anywhere.

I can recommend these shoes without reservation: http://canvas.landsend.com/pp/MacNeilWi ... igin=index
This dark brown will be versatile. The shoes are high quality, should last at least a decade, and they project an adult image.

All this said, while I have strong opinions about clothing and shoes, you really have to screw up to have someone hold it against you. Most of my classmates have worn suits only a handful of times. Interviewers know this. They also know that students don't have a lot of disposable income to spend at Brooks Brothers or Neiman's. They probably remember the way that they dressed at interviews and can sympathize. They know that when you're exposed to the firm's culture on a daily basis, and when you're being paid enough, you'll have no trouble dressing the part. Do your best, but don't be insecure about how you're dressed. When you're actually interviewing, you shouldn't be thinking about your clothes or shoes at all. (This is the secret to wearing suits well. When you've worn them every day for years, you forget that you're wearing them. They become like jeans. This is the difference between wearing your clothes and being worn by them.)


This.

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TCScrutinizer
Posts: 497
Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2009 11:01 pm

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby TCScrutinizer » Sun Apr 18, 2010 12:22 pm

Can I get away with a three-piece suit? I'm kind of a sucker for vests.

jrs12
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2008 1:47 am

Re: Brown Shoes

Postby jrs12 » Sun Apr 18, 2010 1:09 pm

TCS wrote:Can I get away with a three-piece suit? I'm kind of a sucker for vests.


When it comes to interviewing, the answer to any question that begins, "can I get away with..." is a resounding NO. Absolutely not. It's much better to be clueless than to overdress and be laughed at behind your back (or sometimes even to your face). I think vests look smashing, too, but save it for other occasions.

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Cole S. Law
Posts: 237
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Re: Brown Shoes

Postby Cole S. Law » Sun Apr 18, 2010 6:25 pm

TCS wrote:Can I get away with a three-piece suit? I'm kind of a sucker for vests.


I think a 3 piece would be perfectly appropriate once you're hired. In today's style, vests are a small fashion statement that would be perfectly acceptable for a professional. At your interview, you don' t want to make any fashion statements however minor. Go ahead and buy a three-piece if you want. Leave the vest in the closet for your interviews and break it out when you go to work.




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