Rutgers Newark

Share Your Experiences, Read About Other Experiences. Please keep posts organized by school and expected year of graduation.
wizoz
Posts: 173
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 9:47 am

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby wizoz » Sun Apr 11, 2010 1:06 pm

@Keg411

My guy is forever moving things around and so today he's misplaced Adrienne's (our tour guide) biz card. If you still have it, would you do me a kind favor and please pm me her email?

This summer I'm def going to hide all my things from him...so far he's lost my seat deposit form, check and her biz card...lol.

Thanks a mil!

keg411
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Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 9:10 pm

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby keg411 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 1:10 pm

Done!
Boys :lol: :lol: :lol:.

wizoz
Posts: 173
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 9:47 am

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby wizoz » Sun Apr 11, 2010 1:18 pm

keg411 wrote:Done!
Boys :lol: :lol: :lol:.

hahaha so true!!

ericng314
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Jun 25, 2008 5:45 pm

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby ericng314 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:51 pm

Question for Rutgers1L -

Just wondering, I'm debating about purchasing E & E Criminal Law. There's a newer edition (5th edition) that just came out: --LinkRemoved--

However, there's an older edition too (4th edition) that my friend who is also a Rutgers 1l is trying to sell me. Which one should I get? Is there a big difference in E & E editions for criminal law, so much so that I should get the new one? Or should I save money and buy the old one?

Rutgers1L_10
Posts: 106
Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:09 am

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby Rutgers1L_10 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:57 pm

Kate and Bill are in a bar drinking. Bill says he has a car he would like to sell, but will not accept less than $2,000. Kate knows Bill has had a few drinks, but does not think Bill is drunk. Kate writes Bill a check for $2,000 and asks him to give her the keys to the car.
Is this a valid contract?

That's a hypo! And this is basically what law school exams look like (except the fact pattern is usually much longer). I know it seems really easy. By the time you get through the semester you'll realize there are 50 different "issues" in every single sentence.


I'm not sure where the info about MSP and Law Review came from--but it's inaccurate. I know there's some material going around about the proportionality of MSP students and the journals. But that is a deceiving statement. Rutgers has half a dozen accredited journals. After the write-on competition is completed and people have been assigned to their respective journals the school does look at the number of minority (MSP or non-MSP) students on the accredited journals. If the number of minority students admitted to ANY of the journals is not representative of the number of minorities in the school they do use a secondary selection to add more minorities to the journals using the MSP. But that does not mean anyone gets bumped off Law Review or any other accredited journal. There are also unaccredited journals like the Business Law Journal that are used to add to the number of minorities on "journals".

I've talked to 2 different LRW TAs both of which are 3Ls and are on the Law Review staff and they said in the 2 years they've been on the journals they have never seen the "secondary" acceptance to the journals affect Law Review. Meaning the numbers of overall minorities is well within the proportional limits the school is looking for, just based strictly on the writing competition. Since many people can get on an unaccredited journal there is rarely ever a need for more minorities to be added from MSP.

For the record it would be illegal for the school to hold a specific number of spots on the Law Review for minority students--it's called a quota--and it isn't allowed. They do want the number of students on journals, generally, to be representative of the school but there are ways to do that without compromising the competition and the selectivity of the Law Review and other selective journals.
Since LRW and blue booking and citing are the only things you are not allowed to receive help with as a 1L EVERYONE is on an even playing field when it comes to write-on. Not even MSP students are allowed to get any help with LRW. Rutgers is really big on keeping LRW very secretive and hush-hush and they are very particular about all of your LRW work is your own work. So I don't think any student as at any kind of an advantage when it comes to write on, which is probably why there are never any problems with the number of minority students on journals. The number of minorities that make journal is probably directly proportionate the number of overall students that write on, respective to the make up of the school.
So if you're in MSP I wouldn't expect to get some kind of extra boost to getting on Law Review, and if you're not in MSP don't go around whining about how you may not make Law Review because Rutgers has some kind of quota system.
I'm not trying to sound like a jerk but that kind of misinformation is the kind of thing that causes unnecessary stress and tension among classmates. Trust me after the first LRW assignment 99% of you won't even want to be on a journal, and you certainly won't feel confident that you have a chance of making it. LRW has a way of humbling every one!

Rutgers1L_10
Posts: 106
Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:09 am

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby Rutgers1L_10 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 3:03 pm

ericng314 wrote:Question for Rutgers1L -

Just wondering, I'm debating about purchasing E & E Criminal Law. There's a newer edition (5th edition) that just came out: --LinkRemoved--

However, there's an older edition too (4th edition) that my friend who is also a Rutgers 1l is trying to sell me. Which one should I get? Is there a big difference in E & E editions for criminal law, so much so that I should get the new one? Or should I save money and buy the old one?



No there shouldn't be anything too different between the editions. Honestly, I can't think of a reason there would be a new edition except that Aspen Publishing has also put out a new version of a Crim Law casebook and they're trying to make a new supplement to go with it.
As long as your friends E&E is in good shape you should be fine.
I would however caution you--don't rush out and buy a bunch of supps. right away.
You should really try and learn the material from reading. You're barely going to have time to crack open that supp anyway. You'll be so busy just trying to keep up with reading that any supps you buy will collect dust until right before finals. Plus, you should really hold off on using commercial sources right away and just try to learn to read the cases. Crim law cases are probably the easiest cases to understand compared to other black letter law courses. It will really be the information you'll need for an outline and study material that will make things like E&E's helpful.

wizoz
Posts: 173
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 9:47 am

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby wizoz » Sun Apr 11, 2010 3:23 pm

Rutgers1L_10 wrote:Kate and Bill are in a bar drinking. Bill says he has a car he would like to sell, but will not accept less than $2,000. Kate knows Bill has had a few drinks, but does not think Bill is drunk. Kate writes Bill a check for $2,000 and asks him to give her the keys to the car.
Is this a valid contract?

That's a hypo! And this is basically what law school exams look like (except the fact pattern is usually much longer). I know it seems really easy. By the time you get through the semester you'll realize there are 50 different "issues" in every single sentence.


I'm not sure where the info about MSP and Law Review came from--but it's inaccurate. I know there's some material going around about the proportionality of MSP students and the journals. But that is a deceiving statement. Rutgers has half a dozen accredited journals. After the write-on competition is completed and people have been assigned to their respective journals the school does look at the number of minority (MSP or non-MSP) students on the accredited journals. If the number of minority students admitted to ANY of the journals is not representative of the number of minorities in the school they do use a secondary selection to add more minorities to the journals using the MSP. But that does not mean anyone gets bumped off Law Review or any other accredited journal. There are also unaccredited journals like the Business Law Journal that are used to add to the number of minorities on "journals".

I've talked to 2 different LRW TAs both of which are 3Ls and are on the Law Review staff and they said in the 2 years they've been on the journals they have never seen the "secondary" acceptance to the journals affect Law Review. Meaning the numbers of overall minorities is well within the proportional limits the school is looking for, just based strictly on the writing competition. Since many people can get on an unaccredited journal there is rarely ever a need for more minorities to be added from MSP.

For the record it would be illegal for the school to hold a specific number of spots on the Law Review for minority students--it's called a quota--and it isn't allowed. They do want the number of students on journals, generally, to be representative of the school but there are ways to do that without compromising the competition and the selectivity of the Law Review and other selective journals.
Since LRW and blue booking and citing are the only things you are not allowed to receive help with as a 1L EVERYONE is on an even playing field when it comes to write-on. Not even MSP students are allowed to get any help with LRW. Rutgers is really big on keeping LRW very secretive and hush-hush and they are very particular about all of your LRW work is your own work. So I don't think any student as at any kind of an advantage when it comes to write on, which is probably why there are never any problems with the number of minority students on journals. The number of minorities that make journal is probably directly proportionate the number of overall students that write on, respective to the make up of the school.
So if you're in MSP I wouldn't expect to get some kind of extra boost to getting on Law Review, and if you're not in MSP don't go around whining about how you may not make Law Review because Rutgers has some kind of quota system.
I'm not trying to sound like a jerk but that kind of misinformation is the kind of thing that causes unnecessary stress and tension among classmates. Trust me after the first LRW assignment 99% of you won't even want to be on a journal, and you certainly won't feel confident that you have a chance of making it. LRW has a way of humbling every one!


Thanks for explaining what hypos are.

Also, the info for MSP and Law Review actually comes directly from the Law Review website under staff selection. It's good to know that the secondary selection rarely, if ever, takes place. In that case, I would agree there is no preferential treatment.

However, what you've described here is not exactly as is written on the Law Review site as far as this "quota" system. You've described it as a system that takes place not exclusively for Law Review but is overarching among all of the law school's journals. That point, I did not know as no mention of such is even made on the Law Review staff selection page.

http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~review/staffSelection.php

jdjd2013
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby jdjd2013 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 3:40 pm

Rutgers1L_10 wrote:
I'm not sure where the info about MSP and Law Review came from--but it's inaccurate. I know there's some material going around about the proportionality of MSP students and the journals. But that is a deceiving statement. Rutgers has half a dozen accredited journals. After the write-on competition is completed and people have been assigned to their respective journals the school does look at the number of minority (MSP or non-MSP) students on the accredited journals. If the number of minority students admitted to ANY of the journals is not representative of the number of minorities in the school they do use a secondary selection to add more minorities to the journals using the MSP. But that does not mean anyone gets bumped off Law Review or any other accredited journal. There are also unaccredited journals like the Business Law Journal that are used to add to the number of minorities on "journals".

I've talked to 2 different LRW TAs both of which are 3Ls and are on the Law Review staff and they said in the 2 years they've been on the journals they have never seen the "secondary" acceptance to the journals affect Law Review. Meaning the numbers of overall minorities is well within the proportional limits the school is looking for, just based strictly on the writing competition. Since many people can get on an unaccredited journal there is rarely ever a need for more minorities to be added from MSP.

For the record it would be illegal for the school to hold a specific number of spots on the Law Review for minority students--it's called a quota--and it isn't allowed. They do want the number of students on journals, generally, to be representative of the school but there are ways to do that without compromising the competition and the selectivity of the Law Review and other selective journals.
Since LRW and blue booking and citing are the only things you are not allowed to receive help with as a 1L EVERYONE is on an even playing field when it comes to write-on. Not even MSP students are allowed to get any help with LRW. Rutgers is really big on keeping LRW very secretive and hush-hush and they are very particular about all of your LRW work is your own work. So I don't think any student as at any kind of an advantage when it comes to write on, which is probably why there are never any problems with the number of minority students on journals. The number of minorities that make journal is probably directly proportionate the number of overall students that write on, respective to the make up of the school.
So if you're in MSP I wouldn't expect to get some kind of extra boost to getting on Law Review, and if you're not in MSP don't go around whining about how you may not make Law Review because Rutgers has some kind of quota system.
I'm not trying to sound like a jerk but that kind of misinformation is the kind of thing that causes unnecessary stress and tension among classmates. Trust me after the first LRW assignment 99% of you won't even want to be on a journal, and you certainly won't feel confident that you have a chance of making it. LRW has a way of humbling every one!



A few questions about the journals at Rutgers (sorry if these have been answered already)....

Are the writing competitions for journals held after finals? How many new members do the journals typically take? Does your GPA factor into your selection for a journal? Thanks!

Rutgers1L_10
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Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2010 12:09 am

Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby Rutgers1L_10 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 4:06 pm

wizoz wrote:Thanks for explaining what hypos are.

Also, the info for MSP and Law Review actually comes directly from the Law Review website under staff selection. It's good to know that the secondary selection rarely, if ever, takes place. In that case, I would agree there is no preferential treatment.

However, what you've described here is not exactly as is written on the Law Review site as far as this "quota" system. You've described it as a system that takes place not exclusively for Law Review but is overarching among all of the law school's journals. That point, I did not know as no mention of such is even made on the Law Review staff selection page.

http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~review/staffSelection.php


The selection for Law Review and all the accredited journals is the same process and runs at the same time by the Write on Committee. The process for unaccredited journals is not the same. So the rules for Law Review and the process goes for all the accredited journals. When you do the write on you rank in order of preference which journal you want to be on. Depending on your grade you are matched to a corresponding journal. The higher your grade the more likely you are to get the accredited journal of your choice. The lower your grade the less likely you are to get your first choice, but that doesn't mean you won't make journal at all. As I mentioned before Rutgers has 6 accredited journals all available for selection through Write-On.

If the proportion is less than the overall ratio, additional applicants who submitted MSP cards may be admitted in the order of their ranking until the accepted proportion roughly equals the overall ratio.

This is the wording used on the journals. And this is what prohibits them from just tossing people on the Law Review. Getting on a journal is a matching process, so if they have to add people to get the proportion right they don't have to add them to the law Review. They can add them to any journal.

A couple of the journals at Rutgers are some of the best in the country, and the school and staff intend to keep the integrity in the process, which means they aren't going to do anything to dilute the process.
I only brought this up initially because the wording can be misinterpreted by prospective students. This is how people start feeling like they're getting bumped off things, and being put at a disadvantage for the sake of minority programs. The journal competition is extremely difficult, and everyone that does write-on has an equal chance of making it (or not making it).
The journal and the MSP are very old programs and I'm sure at one point it was absolutely necessary for Rutgers to put in place some of the programs they had to in order to ensure the school's goals for giving a quality education to under represented students was being fulfilled. But there is not a single person on a journal that doesn't deserve to be there because he/she did not earn the position.

Journal (for your class) is a LONG way off!!! Trust me, by the time you get ready to write on I am certain any doubts that may be lingering about the validity of the program will be erased. The write on competition is nothing like class, it's not a competition that can be biased for non-minorities, it's not about GPA or LSAT. It's about how well you pick up LRW and the Blue book. If I was going to worry about any kind of boost I would be concerned that people that have siblings or parents that are lawyers are getting a boost. I would be more worried that someone would take the write on packet and get a family member that's a lawyer to help them (which is against the honor code, but let's not kid ourselves into thinking that some people will do anything)

Rutgers1L_10
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby Rutgers1L_10 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 4:26 pm

jdjd2013 wrote:
Rutgers1L_10 wrote:
I'm not sure where the info about MSP and Law Review came from--but it's inaccurate. I know there's some material going around about the proportionality of MSP students and the journals. But that is a deceiving statement. Rutgers has half a dozen accredited journals. After the write-on competition is completed and people have been assigned to their respective journals the school does look at the number of minority (MSP or non-MSP) students on the accredited journals. If the number of minority students admitted to ANY of the journals is not representative of the number of minorities in the school they do use a secondary selection to add more minorities to the journals using the MSP. But that does not mean anyone gets bumped off Law Review or any other accredited journal. There are also unaccredited journals like the Business Law Journal that are used to add to the number of minorities on "journals".

I've talked to 2 different LRW TAs both of which are 3Ls and are on the Law Review staff and they said in the 2 years they've been on the journals they have never seen the "secondary" acceptance to the journals affect Law Review. Meaning the numbers of overall minorities is well within the proportional limits the school is looking for, just based strictly on the writing competition. Since many people can get on an unaccredited journal there is rarely ever a need for more minorities to be added from MSP.

For the record it would be illegal for the school to hold a specific number of spots on the Law Review for minority students--it's called a quota--and it isn't allowed. They do want the number of students on journals, generally, to be representative of the school but there are ways to do that without compromising the competition and the selectivity of the Law Review and other selective journals.
Since LRW and blue booking and citing are the only things you are not allowed to receive help with as a 1L EVERYONE is on an even playing field when it comes to write-on. Not even MSP students are allowed to get any help with LRW. Rutgers is really big on keeping LRW very secretive and hush-hush and they are very particular about all of your LRW work is your own work. So I don't think any student as at any kind of an advantage when it comes to write on, which is probably why there are never any problems with the number of minority students on journals. The number of minorities that make journal is probably directly proportionate the number of overall students that write on, respective to the make up of the school.
So if you're in MSP I wouldn't expect to get some kind of extra boost to getting on Law Review, and if you're not in MSP don't go around whining about how you may not make Law Review because Rutgers has some kind of quota system.
I'm not trying to sound like a jerk but that kind of misinformation is the kind of thing that causes unnecessary stress and tension among classmates. Trust me after the first LRW assignment 99% of you won't even want to be on a journal, and you certainly won't feel confident that you have a chance of making it. LRW has a way of humbling every one!



A few questions about the journals at Rutgers (sorry if these have been answered already)....

Are the writing competitions for journals held after finals? How many new members do the journals typically take? Does your GPA factor into your selection for a journal? Thanks!


The write on packet is available the first business day after the last final of spring semester

Journals can take ~25-30 per journal

1st stage - top 10 people are picked based on having the highest grades of the submissions (This grading is based on format and legal writing)
2nd stage- more people are selected based on a cut-off established by picked the top 10 in the first stage. Only people that are above the cut off are considered for this stage
3rd stage- Grades are only used in this stage (and this is also the stage when MSP status will be considered). Grades are combined with the grade of the submitted packet and additional staff members can be chosen that way.

So in a way, no, grades are not used at Rutgers like they are at other schools. You can not get an automatic spot on a journal just because of your grades, but if they want to add additional members they will consider GPA, but in order to make it to the 3rd stage your submission still has to make the initial cut-off to be considered

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bernie shmegma
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby bernie shmegma » Sun Apr 11, 2010 6:26 pm

Rutgers1L_10 wrote:Kate and Bill are in a bar drinking. Bill says he has a car he would like to sell, but will not accept less than $2,000. Kate knows Bill has had a few drinks, but does not think Bill is drunk. Kate writes Bill a check for $2,000 and asks him to give her the keys to the car.
Is this a valid contract?

That's a hypo! And this is basically what law school exams look like (except the fact pattern is usually much longer). I know it seems really easy. By the time you get through the semester you'll realize there are 50 different "issues" in every single sentence.


I'm not sure where the info about MSP and Law Review came from--but it's inaccurate. I know there's some material going around about the proportionality of MSP students and the journals. But that is a deceiving statement. Rutgers has half a dozen accredited journals. After the write-on competition is completed and people have been assigned to their respective journals the school does look at the number of minority (MSP or non-MSP) students on the accredited journals. If the number of minority students admitted to ANY of the journals is not representative of the number of minorities in the school they do use a secondary selection to add more minorities to the journals using the MSP. But that does not mean anyone gets bumped off Law Review or any other accredited journal. There are also unaccredited journals like the Business Law Journal that are used to add to the number of minorities on "journals".

I've talked to 2 different LRW TAs both of which are 3Ls and are on the Law Review staff and they said in the 2 years they've been on the journals they have never seen the "secondary" acceptance to the journals affect Law Review. Meaning the numbers of overall minorities is well within the proportional limits the school is looking for, just based strictly on the writing competition. Since many people can get on an unaccredited journal there is rarely ever a need for more minorities to be added from MSP.

For the record it would be illegal for the school to hold a specific number of spots on the Law Review for minority students--it's called a quota--and it isn't allowed. They do want the number of students on journals, generally, to be representative of the school but there are ways to do that without compromising the competition and the selectivity of the Law Review and other selective journals.
Since LRW and blue booking and citing are the only things you are not allowed to receive help with as a 1L EVERYONE is on an even playing field when it comes to write-on. Not even MSP students are allowed to get any help with LRW. Rutgers is really big on keeping LRW very secretive and hush-hush and they are very particular about all of your LRW work is your own work. So I don't think any student as at any kind of an advantage when it comes to write on, which is probably why there are never any problems with the number of minority students on journals. The number of minorities that make journal is probably directly proportionate the number of overall students that write on, respective to the make up of the school.
So if you're in MSP I wouldn't expect to get some kind of extra boost to getting on Law Review, and if you're not in MSP don't go around whining about how you may not make Law Review because Rutgers has some kind of quota system.
I'm not trying to sound like a jerk but that kind of misinformation is the kind of thing that causes unnecessary stress and tension among classmates. Trust me after the first LRW assignment 99% of you won't even want to be on a journal, and you certainly won't feel confident that you have a chance of making it. LRW has a way of humbling every one!


I was about to say... But you already mentioned the quota thing (happen to have just been reading the Michigan and Seattle cases yesterday for a paper). Thanks for being clear on that one.

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bernie shmegma
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby bernie shmegma » Sun Apr 11, 2010 6:44 pm

Correct me if I am wrong, but the bottom line is that RU tries to keep the composition of the law journals the same as that of the student body. Meaning, if they admitted URM into the school based on lower standards, they also will keep a similar ratio of those URM to non-URM on the overall participation of journals. Otherwise they would have a disproportionate amount of students who were admitted based on lower standards struggle to take advantage of opportunities within the school. However, the school cannot give any sort of official quota for that number (especially because there is only a preference for being a URM, not a particular number scale, point system, or "quota," thus the student body composition reflects no such quota), nor overcompensate for URM (ie through some MSP advantage).

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inSouthAmerica
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby inSouthAmerica » Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:03 pm

just let them do what theyre gonna do and don't try to understand it.
the better your grades the better your chances, try for good grades.

Rutgers1L_10
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby Rutgers1L_10 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:21 pm

bernie shmegma wrote:Correct me if I am wrong, but the bottom line is that RU tries to keep the composition of the law journals the same as that of the student body. Meaning, if they admitted URM into the school based on lower standards, they also will keep a similar ratio of those URM to non-URM on the overall participation of journals. Otherwise they would have a disproportionate amount of students who were admitted based on lower standards struggle to take advantage of opportunities within the school. However, the school cannot give any sort of official quota for that number (especially because there is only a preference for being a URM, not a particular number scale, point system, or "quota," thus the student body composition reflects no such quota), nor overcompensate for URM (ie through some MSP advantage).



Not quite. I think the language that gets lost is "minority" versus "URM". In the admissions process everyone uses the term URM to mean certain minorities, but those typically do not include Asians, or international students. However, in the makeup of the student journals the percentage of "minority students" is what they look for. That means they look at Asian students that make journal even though Asians are not considered URMs, and they look at international students in the composition of the journal staff. RU is looking to make the percentage of minorities on the journal roughly the equivalent of the overall makeup of minorities that participate in the competition. Right now, I think RU has about 30% minority students (give or take I haven't taken the time to look at the current stats). They don't make provisions to make the journal consist of just MSP students, or black students, or latino students to maintain the proportionality. They're just looking at the overall number. With journals picking roughly 75-100 1Ls out of about 190 it's not really hard to imagine that a large number of the students that make journal will inevitably minority students.
Second, I know you probably didn't mean it the way you said it, but you should really be careful about saying things like "students who were admitted based on lower standards"... I get what you're getting at, but those are the kinds of statements that get taken way out of proportion, and can be offensive, overly general, and wrong.
Rutgers does not admit any students on lower standards. They may use different factors than some other schools, and they may weigh students against each other giving more or less weight to certain factors. But what a prospective student thinks is a "good quality" of a law student, may not necessarily be what law school admissions officers, and legal professionals think are good qualities. And the idea of a prospective student thinking they are more qualified than any other prospective student based on things they don't know is presumptuous and elitist. RU admits students they think will be successful in school and in practice.
The write on competition is held to invite students that show a propensity for understanding legal citations, and legal writing. There is no standard lowering that takes place for that.

@ISA--make sure to see my earlier post about grades. getting good grades, unfortunately, doesn't get you very far if you can't do legal research and writing, and if you don't know how to use your bluebook. Rutgers does not place an emphasis on grades for the journals. But you are right. The process is what it is, and people should just do their best.

lovaholic
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby lovaholic » Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:24 pm

inSouthAmerica wrote:just let them do what theyre gonna do and don't try to understand it.
the better your grades the better your chances, try for good grades.


+1

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bernie shmegma
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby bernie shmegma » Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:28 pm

inSouthAmerica wrote:just let them do what theyre gonna do and don't try to understand it.
the better your grades the better your chances, try for good grades.



I'm going to law school because I'm taking advice everyone has given me throughout my life: "tell it to the judge," they say. You think I am going to "just let them do what they're gonna do and don't try to understand it"? haha Not exactly...

What an unjust world we would be living in if that principle was abused.

I know what you're saying though. You're saying focus on your grades and worry about yourself, anything else is a waste of time etc. Agreed, but just a TLS convo, not an investigation (yet... JK).

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inSouthAmerica
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby inSouthAmerica » Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:49 pm

@ bernie shmegma - hmm don't know how to answer. youre definitely right; and im not trying to stand in your way. just don't let my beloved rutgers newark forum turn into a fight about the merits and demerits of necessary proportional inclusion of minority student bylaws for journal staffing! focus on how you, being who you are, can get onto a publication, and i say "investigate away". the system, however fair, is what it is. can it change, maybe, but it wont happen here, and nobody is going to win any friends in this discussion. and after all, i want this forum talking about happy things.

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bernie shmegma
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby bernie shmegma » Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:18 pm

inSouthAmerica wrote:@ bernie shmegma - hmm don't know how to answer. youre definitely right; and im not trying to stand in your way. just don't let my beloved rutgers newark forum turn into a fight about the merits and demerits of necessary proportional inclusion of minority student bylaws for journal staffing! focus on how you, being who you are, can get onto a publication, and i say "investigate away". the system, however fair, is what it is. can it change, maybe, but it wont happen here, and nobody is going to win any friends in this discussion. and after all, i want this forum talking about happy things.


For your convenience I refrained from responding to Rutgers 1L last post addressed to me, although it was tempting not to give in to your request. Let me rephrase, I refrained from POSTING my response. I figured, for the slight chance that discussions may be perceived as offensive or as a fight vs. a good discussion with a confrontational bite, I might as well avoid that chance (especially if Rutgers 1L would fit that description, being how generous he's been and I wouldn't want to offend).

Happy things... Like clouds?

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inSouthAmerica
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby inSouthAmerica » Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:40 pm

in other happy news. the streak is sadly over. corey booker pissed.

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2010/0 ... ark_f.html

Rutgers1L_10
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby Rutgers1L_10 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:59 pm

bernie shmegma wrote:
inSouthAmerica wrote:@ bernie shmegma - hmm don't know how to answer. youre definitely right; and im not trying to stand in your way. just don't let my beloved rutgers newark forum turn into a fight about the merits and demerits of necessary proportional inclusion of minority student bylaws for journal staffing! focus on how you, being who you are, can get onto a publication, and i say "investigate away". the system, however fair, is what it is. can it change, maybe, but it wont happen here, and nobody is going to win any friends in this discussion. and after all, i want this forum talking about happy things.


For your convenience I refrained from responding to Rutgers 1L last post addressed to me, although it was tempting not to give in to your request. Let me rephrase, I refrained from POSTING my response. I figured, for the slight chance that discussions may be perceived as offensive or as a fight vs. a good discussion with a confrontational bite, I might as well avoid that chance (especially if Rutgers 1L would fit that description, being how generous he's been and I wouldn't want to offend).

Happy things... Like clouds?



This is your guys' thread. It's not my intention for you to think I'm being confrontational. I'm just trying to give you a little bit of advice because I think sometimes things don't always come out in written form they way they are meant. I didn't think you meant anything negative, but people perceive things differently. These are your classmate, and I think if you guys learn to verbalize your thoughts and expressions here you'll be in a better place.
Your position and responses are what they are, I think as long as they come from a place of respect for your classmates then you should feel free to respond. Respect is key and so is accuracy. 99% of the things said on TLS come from people that are being ignorant and repeating inaccurate information fueled by their own insecurity.

So post away!!

get it to x
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby get it to x » Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:05 am

Hey Rutgers_1L, or anyone else with insight, is there a decent number of students who live in Newark itself outside of the dorms or do most students gravitate towards Hoboken and Jersey City? I did a cursory glance for a studio in both places and it seems like rent is very steep ($1700 and up). Are there places in both areas that one could get cheaper?

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audrey hepburn
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby audrey hepburn » Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:40 am

thanks everyone for your information on MSP.

I have a question for Rutgers_1L: What is this "blue book" that you are referring to? Also, do you recommend any readings to help prepare for law school or just to relax the summer before?

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audrey hepburn
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby audrey hepburn » Mon Apr 12, 2010 7:43 am

Another question for Rutgers_1L: Are there any specifications for a laptop that we should use? Is a macbook okay for the exams/assignments or should we just stick with Windows?

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bernie shmegma
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby bernie shmegma » Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:15 am

audrey hepburn wrote:Another question for Rutgers_1L: Are there any specifications for a laptop that we should use? Is a macbook okay for the exams/assignments or should we just stick with Windows?


I think we will find all of this out in due time for sure, but when I sat in on a Con Law class at RU this year there were plenty of Macs and plenty of PCs.

Also, the blue book refers to written exams no? I had a few blue book exams in undergrad that the adjunct professors (who were attorneys) used because they think they're teaching law school. I could be wrong about what a blue book refers to in actual law school though. The ones I am referring to are not dissimilar from the ones back when we started learning cursive in like 2nd grade only the pages are smaller, but normally lined pages instead of smaller, but wide lined pages with dotted lines. This is what I imagine "blue books" to mean, but you didn't ask me.

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audrey hepburn
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Re: Rutgers Newark

Postby audrey hepburn » Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:23 am

bernie shmegma wrote:
audrey hepburn wrote:Another question for Rutgers_1L: Are there any specifications for a laptop that we should use? Is a macbook okay for the exams/assignments or should we just stick with Windows?


I think we will find all of this out in due time for sure, but when I sat in on a Con Law class at RU this year there were plenty of Macs and plenty of PCs.

Also, the blue book refers to written exams no? I had a few blue book exams in undergrad that the adjunct professors (who were attorneys) used because they think they're teaching law school. I could be wrong about what a blue book refers to in actual law school though. The ones I am referring to are not dissimilar from the ones back when we started learning cursive in like 2nd grade only the pages are smaller, but normally lined pages instead of smaller, but wide lined pages with dotted lines. This is what I imagine "blue books" to mean, but you didn't ask me.


thanks for your response- that's actually what I thought blue books referred to as well but i wasn't sure so I wanted to clarify. sorry for referring that question to rutgers_1L but I thought maybe everyone else wasn't sure either. Thanks for the information about the laptops as well...good to know people were using both




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