IN at Lewis & Clark

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chris0406
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 9:54 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby chris0406 » Tue Feb 10, 2009 7:55 pm

I'm scheduled for a visit and a tour, unfortunately because of my schedule I only have time for one....which do you think would be more beneficial to attend? Visiting a class or attending the tour?

treehuggingdirtworshiper
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 2:30 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby treehuggingdirtworshiper » Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:44 am

EscapingIndiana wrote:
treehuggingdirtworshiper wrote:
EscapingIndiana wrote:
treehuggingdirtworshiper wrote:Accepted!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Are you going for environmental law, by chance? I am. Just curious - because that probably helps some applicants, considering that L&C is the #1 ranked environmental law school in the nation.


I focused my statement on how my earning my degree in geology shifted my interests towards law, and my statement included a paragraph explaining my interest in working for the National Crime Victim's Institute at L&C, as well as their certificate in criminal law. I am interested in environmental law, but not nearly as much as criminal law and civil/administrative legal aspects of sexual assault cases in education. I am a tree hugging dirtworshiper, but that fact alone got me into geology more than law.


When you say majoring in geo shifted your interests to law, do you mean that you realized you didn't want to pursue a career in geology? That's what happened to me in biochemistry. I majored in biochem because I've always liked science and I knew it would be tough and respectable - but by the time I was a junior I realized I didn't want to be a doctor or work in a lab - so I started shifting my focus to the issues I care about: global warming, energy, development, etc.
This realization was a focal point in my personal statement.

I haven't got the deferral email everyone's talking about (yet?), so maybe that means I could be accepted and waiting on snail mail! ::Fingers crossed::


Wow, biochemistry...my sole memory of chem lab involved botching an experiment to make orange oil extract in ochem...i was the only one without a yield, it was sooo embarrassing! lol I was also the only student to break two round bottom flasks in the same lab period. I had fun drawing the symbols, but that's about it.

A very traumatic event in my junior year completely changed my interests and impressed upon me the value of legal advocacy. To make a long and personal story short, I am a rape survivor and the perp was a professor in geology. I excelled in my major despite this, and I have many wonderful memories that I will take with me into law school, and I know that my background in science will be an assett to the study of law. Yet, the experience of advocating for myself because no local attorney would take my case truly made me reconsider where my strengths lie. I realized that I enjoyed challenges beyond what an outcrop or volcano presented, and even in class I constantly found myself asking "who is to blame, who pays, why or why not is that company or person liable" etc.

I am not out to save the world with my JD, but I am passionate about specializing in academic/administrative legal issues in sexual assault cases. I would like to work for a small firm or non-profit that would enable me to help clients without considering the financial windfall of the case...the only reason each of the over fifteen attorneys I contacted turned down my case was money (although two added that fighting the college was "too involved" and that they had no relevant experience in administrative and academic law).

kalydscopeeyes
Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2006 3:49 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby kalydscopeeyes » Wed Feb 11, 2009 2:02 am

I just have to say, treehugger, that is an amazing and inspiring story despite the awful circumstances. I am so sorry that you went through that, but at least the silver lining is you found something new to apply your passion to and now you can hopefully help many others. Good luck to you (and everyone else who is still waiting!).

treehuggingdirtworshiper
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 2:30 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby treehuggingdirtworshiper » Wed Feb 11, 2009 3:03 am

kalydscopeeyes wrote:I just have to say, treehugger, that is an amazing and inspiring story despite the awful circumstances. I am so sorry that you went through that, but at least the silver lining is you found something new to apply your passion to and now you can hopefully help many others. Good luck to you (and everyone else who is still waiting!).



Thank you kalydscopeeyes! :D

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kimber1028
Posts: 209
Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:59 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby kimber1028 » Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:55 am

chris0406 wrote:I'm scheduled for a visit and a tour, unfortunately because of my schedule I only have time for one....which do you think would be more beneficial to attend? Visiting a class or attending the tour?


IMO, it really depends on what you're trying to get out of the visit. Personally, I found the tour to be more interesting since I was able to discuss questions with a current student who answered frankly. I had a lot of questions that were situation-specific, though; I won't be moving, so I'll be living in the suburbs and commuting to school, and I wanted to find out if I would be really separated from those in my pod (the class sections formed at L&C) or if I would be able to actively participate in study groups and so forth. I also had an abundance of "student life" type questions that couldn't be answered by anyone other than a current student. A lot of this probably depends on your tour guide, but it was a really good way for me to get a behind-the-scenes look at the law school that I wouldn't have received by reading the admissions material or walking around campus by myself.

The class was a pretty typical class environment, honestly. The main observation I had was that a majority of the students were using OneNote, which I hadn't seen used in undergrad at all. The students were all extremely attentive and engaged, and posed well-versed questions at the end of each case discussion (the professor was very good about asking for questions every ten minutes or so). The Socratic method was used only twice or three times during the class, and the students called on seemed a bit nervous, but happy to participate. They were all prepared with outlines, and pulled those up via OneNote as they were talking so they could discuss the finer points of the case. The class itself was only an hour long (I guess they vary from one to two hours, and the day structure is exactly the same as the night structure), so it was easy to pay attention to the whole lecture without my mind wandering.

Everyone in the class seemed friendly; my tour guide was pretty chummy with almost everyone we ran into on the campus, in fact. Apparently the pods are very tight-knit, and L&C doesn't have the competitiveness of some of the other NW campuses (i.e. Willamette, which was used by the tour guide as a direct example of ultra-competitiveness in comparison). My guide said that she had three different mentors (apparently you can sign up through different organizations to get them), and they had all shared outlines and so forth with her before her classes started this year.

If you want any additional info, feel free to let me know; I'm a fairly observant person and probably picked up a lot of answers that I don't know I have! I also took quite a few notes from the class. It would be worth mentioning that Internet surfing is not recommended--apparently there are cameras in the back of most rooms, so the professors can see what students have on their computers via his/her monitor at the front. There are also podcasts of special lectures, meetings, etc. that are posted online if one is missed, so it seems pretty easy to get access to the material if necessary.

Good luck!

EscapingIndiana
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2008 11:04 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby EscapingIndiana » Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:34 pm


Wow, biochemistry...my sole memory of chem lab involved botching an experiment to make orange oil extract in ochem...i was the only one without a yield, it was sooo embarrassing! lol I was also the only student to break two round bottom flasks in the same lab period. I had fun drawing the symbols, but that's about it.

A very traumatic event in my junior year completely changed my interests and impressed upon me the value of legal advocacy. To make a long and personal story short, I am a rape survivor and the perp was a professor in geology. I excelled in my major despite this, and I have many wonderful memories that I will take with me into law school, and I know that my background in science will be an assett to the study of law. Yet, the experience of advocating for myself because no local attorney would take my case truly made me reconsider where my strengths lie. I realized that I enjoyed challenges beyond what an outcrop or volcano presented, and even in class I constantly found myself asking "who is to blame, who pays, why or why not is that company or person liable" etc.

I am not out to save the world with my JD, but I am passionate about specializing in academic/administrative legal issues in sexual assault cases. I would like to work for a small firm or non-profit that would enable me to help clients without considering the financial windfall of the case...the only reason each of the over fifteen attorneys I contacted turned down my case was money (although two added that fighting the college was "too involved" and that they had no relevant experience in administrative and academic law).


I'm sorry you had to go through that. But truly the best way to really make a difference is through the law. A law degree is arguably the most powerful tool you can have. Most of the geo majors I knew in undergrad are now working for oil and coal companies - which is unconscionable to me because many of these kids became geo majors in the first place because they were into the environment, conservation, Deep Ecology theory, etc. I can't tell you how many of my former biochem peers just want to move to the suburbs with a dental or optometry practice.

It was actually a conversation with an environmental science professor from Oregon State over my Spring Break trip senior year (I'm from Indiana) that showed me just how insulated a lot of science professors are. This professor was telling my friend and I over a pitcher of beer how some species of fish (or was it an insect - damn Oregon brew!) was totally collapsing due to climate changes and habitat loss. I asked what the professor's research team was doing with all the data they had been gathering for years and years, and she basically scoffed and said she didn't want anything to do the government or policy - that it wasn't her problem. I didn't want to be rude, but I should have told her that, unless the research is conveyed to a law or policymaker, that species is done for.

That's my rant. Glad to hear your going public interest law :)

katjust
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 10:49 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby katjust » Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:44 pm

EscapingIndiana wrote:

Wow, biochemistry...my sole memory of chem lab involved botching an experiment to make orange oil extract in ochem...i was the only one without a yield, it was sooo embarrassing! lol I was also the only student to break two round bottom flasks in the same lab period. I had fun drawing the symbols, but that's about it.

A very traumatic event in my junior year completely changed my interests and impressed upon me the value of legal advocacy. To make a long and personal story short, I am a rape survivor and the perp was a professor in geology. I excelled in my major despite this, and I have many wonderful memories that I will take with me into law school, and I know that my background in science will be an assett to the study of law. Yet, the experience of advocating for myself because no local attorney would take my case truly made me reconsider where my strengths lie. I realized that I enjoyed challenges beyond what an outcrop or volcano presented, and even in class I constantly found myself asking "who is to blame, who pays, why or why not is that company or person liable" etc.

I am not out to save the world with my JD, but I am passionate about specializing in academic/administrative legal issues in sexual assault cases. I would like to work for a small firm or non-profit that would enable me to help clients without considering the financial windfall of the case...the only reason each of the over fifteen attorneys I contacted turned down my case was money (although two added that fighting the college was "too involved" and that they had no relevant experience in administrative and academic law).


I'm sorry you had to go through that. But truly the best way to really make a difference is through the law. A law degree is arguably the most powerful tool you can have. Most of the geo majors I knew in undergrad are now working for oil and coal companies - which is unconscionable to me because many of these kids became geo majors in the first place because they were into the environment, conservation, Deep Ecology theory, etc. I can't tell you how many of my former biochem peers just want to move to the suburbs with a dental or optometry practice.

It was actually a conversation with an environmental science professor from Oregon State over my Spring Break trip senior year (I'm from Indiana) that showed me just how insulated a lot of science professors are. This professor was telling my friend and I over a pitcher of beer how some species of fish (or was it an insect - damn Oregon brew!) was totally collapsing due to climate changes and habitat loss. I asked what the professor's research team was doing with all the data they had been gathering for years and years, and she basically scoffed and said she didn't want anything to do the government or policy - that it wasn't her problem. I didn't want to be rude, but I should have told her that, unless the research is conveyed to a law or policymaker, that species is done for.

That's my rant. Glad to hear your going public interest law :)



I don't want to get into a debate, but there are ways to work for oil and coal companies and make a positive difference. Oil and coal company does not automatically equal bad. I know some think so, but I don't. And even if oil and coal do equal bad, one can work with them to help them improve. But I suppose it depends upon one's goal.

To agree with you, I think that law is a great way to make a difference. However, it can be used for evil perhaps even easier than it can be used for good.

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joobacca
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Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby joobacca » Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:48 pm

i thought deep ecology was a joke

katjust
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 10:49 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby katjust » Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:55 pm

joobacca wrote:i thought deep ecology was a joke


Do you mean you literally thought someone was making a joke, or do you mean that you don't take it seriously?

It is definitely a respected way of thinking in some circles.

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joobacca
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Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby joobacca » Wed Feb 11, 2009 1:59 pm

katjust wrote:
joobacca wrote:i thought deep ecology was a joke


Do you mean you literally thought someone was making a joke, or do you mean that you don't take it seriously?

It is definitely a respected way of thinking in some circles.

i meant that it isn't taken seriously. i feel like it's a cult

katjust
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 10:49 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby katjust » Wed Feb 11, 2009 2:02 pm

joobacca wrote:
katjust wrote:
joobacca wrote:i thought deep ecology was a joke


Do you mean you literally thought someone was making a joke, or do you mean that you don't take it seriously?

It is definitely a respected way of thinking in some circles.

i meant that it isn't taken seriously. i feel like it's a cult



I think that it is taken seriously among environmental ethicists. I believe that deep ecology is not the correct way to view the environment (world), but I think that it needs to be debated.

There are those who get super spiritual with it, and that may make it look cultish. But I think serious and intelligent people could hold it to be true without being looked at as crazy. It just needs to be defended like any theory.

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joobacca
Posts: 282
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Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby joobacca » Wed Feb 11, 2009 2:17 pm

katjust wrote:
joobacca wrote:
katjust wrote:
joobacca wrote:i thought deep ecology was a joke


Do you mean you literally thought someone was making a joke, or do you mean that you don't take it seriously?

It is definitely a respected way of thinking in some circles.

i meant that it isn't taken seriously. i feel like it's a cult



I think that it is taken seriously among environmental ethicists. I believe that deep ecology is not the correct way to view the environment (world), but I think that it needs to be debated.

There are those who get super spiritual with it, and that may make it look cultish. But I think serious and intelligent people could hold it to be true without being looked at as crazy. It just needs to be defended like any theory.

honestly, i thought it wasn't taken seriously by environmental ethicists.

katjust
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 10:49 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby katjust » Wed Feb 11, 2009 2:21 pm

joobacca wrote:honestly, i thought it wasn't taken seriously by environmental ethicists.


I'm not in the know with many environmental ethicists, but there are environmental ethicists who are deep ecologists. I am sure that many ethicists in general consider it nutty, and the same probably goes for some environmental ethicists. However, there is nothing necessarily cultish about deep ecology. Some of its adherents might be cultish, but I think that the theory needs to taken seriously because the people who advance it are relatively intelligent.

All that I know is that when I took environmental ethics (6 years ago now I think), my professor, while not a fan of it, did not dismiss it out of hand. Moreover, most (probably all) textbooks on environmental ethics give it more than a cursory pass.


Apologies for getting this thread off track, but I suppose it should be expected that this thread would involve some of this kind of chatter.

lawbug
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 8:34 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby lawbug » Wed Feb 11, 2009 4:29 pm

My status showed that I went complete on 1/25 and was updated again on 2/3. What does that mean? Does anyone in here know?

Nemy
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Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 12:48 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby Nemy » Wed Feb 11, 2009 6:05 pm

lawbug wrote:My status showed that I went complete on 1/25 and was updated again on 2/3. What does that mean? Does anyone in here know?


Most people have gotten that update. It should just be an indication that your file is still being reviewed. I wouldn't think too much into it until the status shows Decision Processed or you receive a package besides the Practical Skills booklet that everyone is getting (which I still haven't received :shock: )

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tchadwick
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Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby tchadwick » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:22 pm

Nemy wrote:
lawbug wrote:My status showed that I went complete on 1/25 and was updated again on 2/3. What does that mean? Does anyone in here know?


Most people have gotten that update. It should just be an indication that your file is still being reviewed. I wouldn't think too much into it until the status shows Decision Processed or you receive a package besides the Practical Skills booklet that everyone is getting (which I still haven't received :shock: )


Now, what is really frustrating is when you go from "Decision Processed" and back to "Application Complete" (and I remember reading that I am not alone here...)

*Sigh*...

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Whitty
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Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby Whitty » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:31 pm

Im still at complete *sigh*

But something that really bothers me, and it really shouldnt..

When you go to the site and click on the Animal Law page, the school name in the upper right hand of the screen says

Lewis and Clark scool

Its a really dumb peeve but everytime I check my status I see it and it gets under my skin.

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tchadwick
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Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby tchadwick » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:39 pm

Whitty wrote:But something that really bothers me, and it really shouldnt..

When you go to the site and click on the Animal Law page, the school name in the upper right hand of the screen says

Lewis and Clark scool

Its a really dumb peeve but everytime I check my status I see it and it gets under my skin.


LOL! I totally agree! I've seen a couple of typos in different sorts of correspondence from admissions offices, and I immediately think a little less of them...

newcritic
Posts: 75
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:36 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby newcritic » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:43 pm

I'm in! Big envelope came today along with a folder and a map of Portland. I also got a scholarship, so there's apparently still money available.

Oh, and my status checker still says "application complete" or whatever, even though it said decision processed for a few days.

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tchadwick
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Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby tchadwick » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:47 pm

newcritic wrote:I'm in! Big envelope came today along with a folder and a map of Portland. I also got a scholarship, so there's apparently still money available.

Oh, and my status checker still says "application complete" or whatever, even though it said decision processed for a few days.


Ah! Hope springs eternal! (And congrats to you, newcritic, of course!)

Anonymous0L

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby Anonymous0L » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:54 pm

Apparently Lewis & Clark does have scholarship money to this day:


http://lawschoolnumbers.com/newcritic/jd

Just saw this on LSN as I was browsing through schools.

newcritic
Posts: 75
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:36 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby newcritic » Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:59 pm

Any guess as to how they decide scholarship awards? It seems like it must be partially determined by soft factors - just using me as an example, I was awarded more than some people with higher LSAT/GPA but less than some people with lower LSAT/GPA. Does any spot a pattern?

tchadwick - Thank you for the congrats!

katjust
Posts: 170
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 10:49 am

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby katjust » Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:17 pm

That's weird. Maybe they made scholarship decisions in a different order than sending out acceptances?

Anonymous0L

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby Anonymous0L » Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:18 pm

Maybe those out of funds letters are just merely excuses. What a tactic. :lol:

newcritic
Posts: 75
Joined: Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:36 pm

Re: IN at Lewis & Clark

Postby newcritic » Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:21 pm

Jwatson wrote:Maybe those out of funds letters are just merely excuses. What a tactic. :lol:


"Mr. Hutz, are you a shyster?"

"Where did a little girl like you learn a big word like that?"




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