Cardozo Law C/O 2020

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Charlie802
Posts: 228
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Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 7:43 pm

potus wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:What did you find made it weak? Quality of their positions, their support of the school, etc.?


The alumni's support of the school seemed forced by their positive interactions and support for the Office of Career Services. There were just some things that stood out to me. One alum got her associate job through RAMP and stated she likely wouldn't have picked up by her firm if it wasn't for that program (placing grads at around min salary at affordable cost to the firm). Another alum got pulled aside at her firm because she was a Cardozo Law student and then asked whether or not she could do the work. Not sure if I misheard. Somehow that was a positive interaction and led to the idea that people think Cardozo students are extremely hardworking. They seemed to reinforce the real landscape that Cardozo's tiered below "prestigious schools like Fordham," and they seemed baffled when asked about opportunities outside of NYC -- forcing an alum to cite her experiences working at the border of North/South Korea for the U.S. military. Outside the NYC Law Dept., the firms they worked in only had a handful of Cardozo students relative to other T14 and regionals, but made sure to say that all feedback has always been positive. And they also made sure to reiterate the moot court comps and beating schools like Harvard, etc.

Probably huge props for presenting what seems to be reality, but disconcerting in shaping the narrative for potential incoming 1L students.


Thank you. Incredibly insightful and helpful! I'm not leaning towards dozo, this reaffirms why.

tnovak894
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 12:02 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby tnovak894 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:12 pm

Hey! Was at ASD today. Wasn't overly impressed with the school as a whole, but admin, professors, and students were all friendly and helpful. I was surprised they didn't put on more of a show of trying to be a prestigious school as I was expecting them to, but then I was actually happy they didn't try and fake who they really are. No coverup, just owning up to where they stand as a law school in nyc. Panels were pretty much what I expected, didn't learn much I didn't know, and kinda wished I just could've been watching some march madness. What other schools are you guys looking at? been to visit any other schools? I am not sold on dozo yet, and gonna explore the rest of my options. Looking for some insight...

tnovak894
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 12:02 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby tnovak894 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:14 pm

Ferrisjso wrote:Got screwed in the mock class, bungled a followup question because I didn't expect him to follow up, looked like an idiot. Liked the case though. Thought the faculty was great(only qualm I had was that the Dean dropped the whole "there is no limit to what you can do with a law degree" line once), the two personal interactions I had with faculty both at lunch and on the tour really impressed me. Law Review also really had their shit together, they were just a class act. I just can't picture myself going to school there(I am already someone who was skeptical about going to school in Manhattan in general, so if you're one of those people who loves NYC, take my words with a grain of salt, because that's a factor). School's "Hispanic association" also really didn't seem to exist and seemed to just share a tiny room with the rest of the minority associations. I know the schools' physical plant is supposed to be irrelevant but I just got a depressing vibe from it(not the people who again were great, the place). Also did anyone notice the bizzare collection of sofas stacked up on one another near the second floor stairs(or maybe third floor stairs), that kind of freaked me out?

were u in the back row middle section? I remeber some guy saying to the prof " ah yea, u got me... i dont know". If it was then don't worry so much, you sounded fine. Props for speaking up in the first place :D

Charlie802
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:56 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:17 pm

tnovak894 wrote:Hey! Was at ASD today. Wasn't overly impressed with the school as a whole, but admin, professors, and students were all friendly and helpful. I was surprised they didn't put on more of a show of trying to be a prestigious school as I was expecting them to, but then I was actually happy they didn't try and fake who they really are. No coverup, just owning up to where they stand as a law school in nyc. Panels were pretty much what I expected, didn't learn much I didn't know, and kinda wished I just could've been watching some march madness. What other schools are you guys looking at? been to visit any other schools? I am not sold on dozo yet, and gonna explore the rest of my options. Looking for some insight...


Other schools I'm looking at are out of NYC. Feel free to PM if you want more info. Thanks for the feedback on your experience. I agree that it is nice they aren't trying to present themeselves as something they're not.

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potus
Posts: 124
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Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby potus » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:28 pm

There was a girl at ASD who looked so similar to Yorkie from San Junipero on Black Mirror. She raised her hand for the longest time, but the prof didn't see her behind the pillar.

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Ferrisjso
Comptroller General of Cloudcuckooland
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Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Ferrisjso » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:36 pm

tnovak894 wrote:
Ferrisjso wrote:Got screwed in the mock class, bungled a followup question because I didn't expect him to follow up, looked like an idiot. Liked the case though. Thought the faculty was great(only qualm I had was that the Dean dropped the whole "there is no limit to what you can do with a law degree" line once), the two personal interactions I had with faculty both at lunch and on the tour really impressed me. Law Review also really had their shit together, they were just a class act. I just can't picture myself going to school there(I am already someone who was skeptical about going to school in Manhattan in general, so if you're one of those people who loves NYC, take my words with a grain of salt, because that's a factor). School's "Hispanic association" also really didn't seem to exist and seemed to just share a tiny room with the rest of the minority associations. I know the schools' physical plant is supposed to be irrelevant but I just got a depressing vibe from it(not the people who again were great, the place). Also did anyone notice the bizzare collection of sofas stacked up on one another near the second floor stairs(or maybe third floor stairs), that kind of freaked me out?

were u in the back row middle section? I remeber some guy saying to the prof " ah yea, u got me... i dont know". If it was then don't worry so much, you sounded fine. Props for speaking up in the first place :D


Yeah, that was me. Thanks, appreciate that! Now that I think of it, I think you may have a point, they do deserve credit for not pretending they were something they weren't. I was surprised to(I recall one of the initial acceptance letters I received, saying something about how they were the peer of Fordham, BU, BC etc). The professor at my table(who was awesome, if I had ended up going I would have killed to be in his section) mentioned the 9 spot jump in US News and seemed genuinely thrilled about it. Great people, the school just didn't seem like the right fit for me(and from reading the thread it seems other people on here feel the same way).

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Ferrisjso
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Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Ferrisjso » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:43 pm

tnovak894 wrote:Hey! Was at ASD today. Wasn't overly impressed with the school as a whole, but admin, professors, and students were all friendly and helpful. I was surprised they didn't put on more of a show of trying to be a prestigious school as I was expecting them to, but then I was actually happy they didn't try and fake who they really are. No coverup, just owning up to where they stand as a law school in nyc. Panels were pretty much what I expected, didn't learn much I didn't know, and kinda wished I just could've been watching some march madness. What other schools are you guys looking at? been to visit any other schools? I am not sold on dozo yet, and gonna explore the rest of my options. Looking for some insight...


Leaning towards UCONN. If W+L takes me off the waitlist, I'm going to try and see if I can coerce my grandparents to either pay for it or give me an interest free loan. Someone(ironically trying to discourage me from paying close to sticker) told me that the most likely outcome there was clerking for a judge in the middle of nowhere and that outcome sounds more and more appealing to me by the day. Was leaning towards Cardozo before today(it was the unanimous choice in my choosing a law school thread) but now I'm pretty sure the school isn't for me(if I'm miserable commuting and end up in a market that I despise, is saving 40k-100k truly worth it?). I'm also considering Brooklyn again, even though they played an accounting trick on me with my scholly which initially really pissed me off, but hey if I can commute, it's still my cheapest non TTT option(my total COA would be about 70k over 2 years, if I could find a magical way to commute from Queens, which will be a pretty tall order). Am also on Richmond's priority WL and have an application pending at Widener in Deleware. How about you, what are your options?

DozoLawStudent
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:56 am

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby DozoLawStudent » Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:15 am

Charlie802 wrote:
potus wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:What did you find made it weak? Quality of their positions, their support of the school, etc.?


The alumni's support of the school seemed forced by their positive interactions and support for the Office of Career Services. There were just some things that stood out to me. One alum got her associate job through RAMP and stated she likely wouldn't have picked up by her firm if it wasn't for that program (placing grads at around min salary at affordable cost to the firm). Another alum got pulled aside at her firm because she was a Cardozo Law student and then asked whether or not she could do the work. Not sure if I misheard. Somehow that was a positive interaction and led to the idea that people think Cardozo students are extremely hardworking. They seemed to reinforce the real landscape that Cardozo's tiered below "prestigious schools like Fordham," and they seemed baffled when asked about opportunities outside of NYC -- forcing an alum to cite her experiences working at the border of North/South Korea for the U.S. military. Outside the NYC Law Dept., the firms they worked in only had a handful of Cardozo students relative to other T14 and regionals, but made sure to say that all feedback has always been positive. And they also made sure to reiterate the moot court comps and beating schools like Harvard, etc.

Probably huge props for presenting what seems to be reality, but disconcerting in shaping the narrative for potential incoming 1L students.


Thank you. Incredibly insightful and helpful! I'm not leaning towards dozo, this reaffirms why.


Hi All,

Saw this post and figured this would be a good place to start. I am currently a 2L at Cardozo, so I feel like I can provide some insight to this discussion. When I was choosing what law school to go to, I was deciding between Cardozo, Fordham, American, George Washington, and Boulder. I chose Cardozo for the scholarship money, even though I was admitted to higher-ranked schools, and I do not regret it. I have had opportunities to work as a research assistant and a teaching assistant; I'm the new Senior Notes editor for the Law Review; I have a summer associate position at Akin Gump; and overall I have incredible relationships with the faculty at this school.

We have had plenty of students work outside of NY; many students choose to clerk for federal circuit court judges around the country, and students also end up with jobs both in the private and public sectors across the country. I know people who have gone to work at the Southern Poverty Law Center, the ACLU, government agencies in DC, law firms in Chicago and LA . . . the options are vast.

Regarding the ethos of hardworking Cardozo students, I agree that we have that reputation in the field. Cardozo is a young school looking to move up in the rankings and establish its position in the law school world, and students who graduate are eager to represent a law school that shaped them to be talented, respectful, and yes, hardworking law students.

I have had an incredible experience with the alum network at Cardozo. When going through the On Campus Interview process, I connected with many alums eager to see more Cardozo students at their law firms. In securing my summer associate position, I had five Cardozo alums reach out to me from Akin to see if I wanted to meet and discuss the firm. They are out there in force and they are excited to usher in more Cardozo graduates. Admittedly, there are fewer Cardozo students in law firms than students from Harvard, Yale, Columbia, etc., but part of that is due to how young we are as compared to these other schools. When it comes to the firms our students get into, there is no firm that is unwilling to accept Cardozo students. In my class year alone, we have students going to incredibly prestigious firms--Cravath, Kirkland, Cleary, Sullivan Cromwell, Skadden, Latham, Simpson, etc. If that is something you want, Cardozo can help you get there.

I'd love to help all of you out in making this choice. I remember how difficult it was for me, and I wish I had been able to speak to more students before making this decision. I understand the concerns articulated on this page--rankings, alum network, furniture stacked in the corner (it was only there to accommodate the reception on the third floor), older facilities, etc.You can ask me anything, I will answer honestly. I just don't want anyone's decision to be made based on misconceptions or fears of missed opportunities.

Legallylawyer2020
Posts: 151
Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:26 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Legallylawyer2020 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:42 am

DozoLawStudent wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:
potus wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:What did you find made it weak? Quality of their positions, their support of the school, etc.?


The alumni's support of the school seemed forced by their positive interactions and support for the Office of Career Services. There were just some things that stood out to me. One alum got her associate job through RAMP and stated she likely wouldn't have picked up by her firm if it wasn't for that program (placing grads at around min salary at affordable cost to the firm). Another alum got pulled aside at her firm because she was a Cardozo Law student and then asked whether or not she could do the work. Not sure if I misheard. Somehow that was a positive interaction and led to the idea that people think Cardozo students are extremely hardworking. They seemed to reinforce the real landscape that Cardozo's tiered below "prestigious schools like Fordham," and they seemed baffled when asked about opportunities outside of NYC -- forcing an alum to cite her experiences working at the border of North/South Korea for the U.S. military. Outside the NYC Law Dept., the firms they worked in only had a handful of Cardozo students relative to other T14 and regionals, but made sure to say that all feedback has always been positive. And they also made sure to reiterate the moot court comps and beating schools like Harvard, etc.

Probably huge props for presenting what seems to be reality, but disconcerting in shaping the narrative for potential incoming 1L students.


Thank you. Incredibly insightful and helpful! I'm not leaning towards dozo, this reaffirms why.


Hi All,

Saw this post and figured this would be a good place to start. I am currently a 2L at Cardozo, so I feel like I can provide some insight to this discussion. When I was choosing what law school to go to, I was deciding between Cardozo, Fordham, American, George Washington, and Boulder. I chose Cardozo for the scholarship money, even though I was admitted to higher-ranked schools, and I do not regret it. I have had opportunities to work as a research assistant and a teaching assistant; I'm the new Senior Notes editor for the Law Review; I have a summer associate position at Akin Gump; and overall I have incredible relationships with the faculty at this school.

We have had plenty of students work outside of NY; many students choose to clerk for federal circuit court judges around the country, and students also end up with jobs both in the private and public sectors across the country. I know people who have gone to work at the Southern Poverty Law Center, the ACLU, government agencies in DC, law firms in Chicago and LA . . . the options are vast.

Regarding the ethos of hardworking Cardozo students, I agree that we have that reputation in the field. Cardozo is a young school looking to move up in the rankings and establish its position in the law school world, and students who graduate are eager to represent a law school that shaped them to be talented, respectful, and yes, hardworking law students.

I have had an incredible experience with the alum network at Cardozo. When going through the On Campus Interview process, I connected with many alums eager to see more Cardozo students at their law firms. In securing my summer associate position, I had five Cardozo alums reach out to me from Akin to see if I wanted to meet and discuss the firm. They are out there in force and they are excited to usher in more Cardozo graduates. Admittedly, there are fewer Cardozo students in law firms than students from Harvard, Yale, Columbia, etc., but part of that is due to how young we are as compared to these other schools. When it comes to the firms our students get into, there is no firm that is unwilling to accept Cardozo students. In my class year alone, we have students going to incredibly prestigious firms--Cravath, Kirkland, Cleary, Sullivan Cromwell, Skadden, Latham, Simpson, etc. If that is something you want, Cardozo can help you get there.

I'd love to help all of you out in making this choice. I remember how difficult it was for me, and I wish I had been able to speak to more students before making this decision. I understand the concerns articulated on this page--rankings, alum network, furniture stacked in the corner (it was only there to accommodate the reception on the third floor), older facilities, etc.You can ask me anything, I will answer honestly. I just don't want anyone's decision to be made based on misconceptions or fears of missed opportunities.


I ended up being unable to make it to ASD yesterday but I'm wondering if you can articulate why you chose Cardozo over Fordham. Was it only the scholarship money or was there more to that decision? Also, I'm wondering where most students live and what the competitive nature of Cardozo students is like. Is it a friendly and collegial atmosphere or is it very competitive?

DozoLawStudent
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:56 am

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby DozoLawStudent » Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:53 am

Legallylawyer2020 wrote:
DozoLawStudent wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:
potus wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:What did you find made it weak? Quality of their positions, their support of the school, etc.?


The alumni's support of the school seemed forced by their positive interactions and support for the Office of Career Services. There were just some things that stood out to me. One alum got her associate job through RAMP and stated she likely wouldn't have picked up by her firm if it wasn't for that program (placing grads at around min salary at affordable cost to the firm). Another alum got pulled aside at her firm because she was a Cardozo Law student and then asked whether or not she could do the work. Not sure if I misheard. Somehow that was a positive interaction and led to the idea that people think Cardozo students are extremely hardworking. They seemed to reinforce the real landscape that Cardozo's tiered below "prestigious schools like Fordham," and they seemed baffled when asked about opportunities outside of NYC -- forcing an alum to cite her experiences working at the border of North/South Korea for the U.S. military. Outside the NYC Law Dept., the firms they worked in only had a handful of Cardozo students relative to other T14 and regionals, but made sure to say that all feedback has always been positive. And they also made sure to reiterate the moot court comps and beating schools like Harvard, etc.

Probably huge props for presenting what seems to be reality, but disconcerting in shaping the narrative for potential incoming 1L students.


Thank you. Incredibly insightful and helpful! I'm not leaning towards dozo, this reaffirms why.


Hi All,

Saw this post and figured this would be a good place to start. I am currently a 2L at Cardozo, so I feel like I can provide some insight to this discussion. When I was choosing what law school to go to, I was deciding between Cardozo, Fordham, American, George Washington, and Boulder. I chose Cardozo for the scholarship money, even though I was admitted to higher-ranked schools, and I do not regret it. I have had opportunities to work as a research assistant and a teaching assistant; I'm the new Senior Notes editor for the Law Review; I have a summer associate position at Akin Gump; and overall I have incredible relationships with the faculty at this school.

We have had plenty of students work outside of NY; many students choose to clerk for federal circuit court judges around the country, and students also end up with jobs both in the private and public sectors across the country. I know people who have gone to work at the Southern Poverty Law Center, the ACLU, government agencies in DC, law firms in Chicago and LA . . . the options are vast.

Regarding the ethos of hardworking Cardozo students, I agree that we have that reputation in the field. Cardozo is a young school looking to move up in the rankings and establish its position in the law school world, and students who graduate are eager to represent a law school that shaped them to be talented, respectful, and yes, hardworking law students.

I have had an incredible experience with the alum network at Cardozo. When going through the On Campus Interview process, I connected with many alums eager to see more Cardozo students at their law firms. In securing my summer associate position, I had five Cardozo alums reach out to me from Akin to see if I wanted to meet and discuss the firm. They are out there in force and they are excited to usher in more Cardozo graduates. Admittedly, there are fewer Cardozo students in law firms than students from Harvard, Yale, Columbia, etc., but part of that is due to how young we are as compared to these other schools. When it comes to the firms our students get into, there is no firm that is unwilling to accept Cardozo students. In my class year alone, we have students going to incredibly prestigious firms--Cravath, Kirkland, Cleary, Sullivan Cromwell, Skadden, Latham, Simpson, etc. If that is something you want, Cardozo can help you get there.

I'd love to help all of you out in making this choice. I remember how difficult it was for me, and I wish I had been able to speak to more students before making this decision. I understand the concerns articulated on this page--rankings, alum network, furniture stacked in the corner (it was only there to accommodate the reception on the third floor), older facilities, etc.You can ask me anything, I will answer honestly. I just don't want anyone's decision to be made based on misconceptions or fears of missed opportunities.


I ended up being unable to make it to ASD yesterday but I'm wondering if you can articulate why you chose Cardozo over Fordham. Was it only the scholarship money or was there more to that decision? Also, I'm wondering where most students live and what the competitive nature of Cardozo students is like. Is it a friendly and collegial atmosphere or is it very competitive?


My decision was two-fold; one part was the scholarship money, but the other was the community component of Cardozo. I knew I did not want to be in an environment where students were wasting energy competing with each other, rather than focusing on their own success. I found Fordham to lean more towards the classic competitive environment, while Cardozo rather explicitly stated they were not a competitive school. Since starting here at Cardozo I have found that to be extremely true. If I miss a class, there's a student who will always offer notes, and will likely also offer to sit down and talk about it over coffee. Most of the students are warm and friendly, and we all appreciate the collegiality of our school.
Regarding housing, I find that many 1Ls choose to live in student housing, but the 2Ls and 3Ls live on their own. I lived in student housing my first year and had a great experience. I came from NH, so NY real estate was not something I knew anything about, and having Cardozo's housing available made everything much simpler. I also got the opportunity to meet lots of students that way, and it was a great support system to have while going through my 1L year. As a 2L I now live out in Bushwick, which was a nice shift going into upper level years. I have a quiet space, a backyard, and some time on the subway to let my brain separate from law school. I have friends who live all over--Lakewood, Jersey City, Staten Island, Queens, Harlem, Manhattan--so there is no right place to live while in law school. The lockers make commuting easier, because you don't have to carry all of your things back and forth each day.

Charlie802
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:56 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:05 pm

DozoLawStudent wrote:
Legallylawyer2020 wrote:
DozoLawStudent wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:
potus wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:What did you find made it weak? Quality of their positions, their support of the school, etc.?


The alumni's support of the school seemed forced by their positive interactions and support for the Office of Career Services. There were just some things that stood out to me. One alum got her associate job through RAMP and stated she likely wouldn't have picked up by her firm if it wasn't for that program (placing grads at around min salary at affordable cost to the firm). Another alum got pulled aside at her firm because she was a Cardozo Law student and then asked whether or not she could do the work. Not sure if I misheard. Somehow that was a positive interaction and led to the idea that people think Cardozo students are extremely hardworking. They seemed to reinforce the real landscape that Cardozo's tiered below "prestigious schools like Fordham," and they seemed baffled when asked about opportunities outside of NYC -- forcing an alum to cite her experiences working at the border of North/South Korea for the U.S. military. Outside the NYC Law Dept., the firms they worked in only had a handful of Cardozo students relative to other T14 and regionals, but made sure to say that all feedback has always been positive. And they also made sure to reiterate the moot court comps and beating schools like Harvard, etc.

Probably huge props for presenting what seems to be reality, but disconcerting in shaping the narrative for potential incoming 1L students.


Thank you. Incredibly insightful and helpful! I'm not leaning towards dozo, this reaffirms why.


Hi All,

Saw this post and figured this would be a good place to start. I am currently a 2L at Cardozo, so I feel like I can provide some insight to this discussion. When I was choosing what law school to go to, I was deciding between Cardozo, Fordham, American, George Washington, and Boulder. I chose Cardozo for the scholarship money, even though I was admitted to higher-ranked schools, and I do not regret it. I have had opportunities to work as a research assistant and a teaching assistant; I'm the new Senior Notes editor for the Law Review; I have a summer associate position at Akin Gump; and overall I have incredible relationships with the faculty at this school.

We have had plenty of students work outside of NY; many students choose to clerk for federal circuit court judges around the country, and students also end up with jobs both in the private and public sectors across the country. I know people who have gone to work at the Southern Poverty Law Center, the ACLU, government agencies in DC, law firms in Chicago and LA . . . the options are vast.

Regarding the ethos of hardworking Cardozo students, I agree that we have that reputation in the field. Cardozo is a young school looking to move up in the rankings and establish its position in the law school world, and students who graduate are eager to represent a law school that shaped them to be talented, respectful, and yes, hardworking law students.

I have had an incredible experience with the alum network at Cardozo. When going through the On Campus Interview process, I connected with many alums eager to see more Cardozo students at their law firms. In securing my summer associate position, I had five Cardozo alums reach out to me from Akin to see if I wanted to meet and discuss the firm. They are out there in force and they are excited to usher in more Cardozo graduates. Admittedly, there are fewer Cardozo students in law firms than students from Harvard, Yale, Columbia, etc., but part of that is due to how young we are as compared to these other schools. When it comes to the firms our students get into, there is no firm that is unwilling to accept Cardozo students. In my class year alone, we have students going to incredibly prestigious firms--Cravath, Kirkland, Cleary, Sullivan Cromwell, Skadden, Latham, Simpson, etc. If that is something you want, Cardozo can help you get there.

I'd love to help all of you out in making this choice. I remember how difficult it was for me, and I wish I had been able to speak to more students before making this decision. I understand the concerns articulated on this page--rankings, alum network, furniture stacked in the corner (it was only there to accommodate the reception on the third floor), older facilities, etc.You can ask me anything, I will answer honestly. I just don't want anyone's decision to be made based on misconceptions or fears of missed opportunities.


I ended up being unable to make it to ASD yesterday but I'm wondering if you can articulate why you chose Cardozo over Fordham. Was it only the scholarship money or was there more to that decision? Also, I'm wondering where most students live and what the competitive nature of Cardozo students is like. Is it a friendly and collegial atmosphere or is it very competitive?


My decision was two-fold; one part was the scholarship money, but the other was the community component of Cardozo. I knew I did not want to be in an environment where students were wasting energy competing with each other, rather than focusing on their own success. I found Fordham to lean more towards the classic competitive environment, while Cardozo rather explicitly stated they were not a competitive school. Since starting here at Cardozo I have found that to be extremely true. If I miss a class, there's a student who will always offer notes, and will likely also offer to sit down and talk about it over coffee. Most of the students are warm and friendly, and we all appreciate the collegiality of our school.
Regarding housing, I find that many 1Ls choose to live in student housing, but the 2Ls and 3Ls live on their own. I lived in student housing my first year and had a great experience. I came from NH, so NY real estate was not something I knew anything about, and having Cardozo's housing available made everything much simpler. I also got the opportunity to meet lots of students that way, and it was a great support system to have while going through my 1L year. As a 2L I now live out in Bushwick, which was a nice shift going into upper level years. I have a quiet space, a backyard, and some time on the subway to let my brain separate from law school. I have friends who live all over--Lakewood, Jersey City, Staten Island, Queens, Harlem, Manhattan--so there is no right place to live while in law school. The lockers make commuting easier, because you don't have to carry all of your things back and forth each day.


I've heard the student housing is incredibly expensive. Did you find that? Coming from WAY out of state it would be my best option, same boat of not understanding the NYC housing market.

Are you in the top 10% of your class?

DozoLawStudent
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:56 am

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby DozoLawStudent » Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:24 pm

Charlie802 wrote:
DozoLawStudent wrote:
Legallylawyer2020 wrote:
DozoLawStudent wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:
potus wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:What did you find made it weak? Quality of their positions, their support of the school, etc.?








I ended up being unable to make it to ASD yesterday but I'm wondering if you can articulate why you chose Cardozo over Fordham. Was it only the scholarship money or was there more to that decision? Also, I'm wondering where most students live and what the competitive nature of Cardozo students is like. Is it a friendly and collegial atmosphere or is it very competitive?


My decision was two-fold; one part was the scholarship money, but the other was the community component of Cardozo. I knew I did not want to be in an environment where students were wasting energy competing with each other, rather than focusing on their own success. I found Fordham to lean more towards the classic competitive environment, while Cardozo rather explicitly stated they were not a competitive school. Since starting here at Cardozo I have found that to be extremely true. If I miss a class, there's a student who will always offer notes, and will likely also offer to sit down and talk about it over coffee. Most of the students are warm and friendly, and we all appreciate the collegiality of our school.
Regarding housing, I find that many 1Ls choose to live in student housing, but the 2Ls and 3Ls live on their own. I lived in student housing my first year and had a great experience. I came from NH, so NY real estate was not something I knew anything about, and having Cardozo's housing available made everything much simpler. I also got the opportunity to meet lots of students that way, and it was a great support system to have while going through my 1L year. As a 2L I now live out in Bushwick, which was a nice shift going into upper level years. I have a quiet space, a backyard, and some time on the subway to let my brain separate from law school. I have friends who live all over--Lakewood, Jersey City, Staten Island, Queens, Harlem, Manhattan--so there is no right place to live while in law school. The lockers make commuting easier, because you don't have to carry all of your things back and forth each day.


I've heard the student housing is incredibly expensive. Did you find that? Coming from WAY out of state it would be my best option, same boat of not understanding the NYC housing market.

Are you in the top 10% of your class?


I don't think student housing is the cheapest option, but it also isn't incredibly expensive. I paid $1500/month when I was in student housing, and that is pretty typical (if not a little cheap) for a two-bedroom in Manhattan. I think, unfortunately, NYC real estate in general is expensive. I moved out to Brooklyn in search of slightly cheaper rent, and now I only pay $700 a month for an apartment I share with two roommates. I think it was worth it to live in the student housing my first year; if I had lived out in Bushwick from the start, it would have been harder for me to get to know as many people as I do already. Many of my friends were already living in the city when they started law school, so they kept their Manhattan apartments, but as someone from out of state I think it was a good choice for me.

I am in the top 10%.

Charlie802
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:56 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:33 pm

DozoLawStudent wrote:
I don't think student housing is the cheapest option, but it also isn't incredibly expensive. I paid $1500/month when I was in student housing, and that is pretty typical (if not a little cheap) for a two-bedroom in Manhattan. I think, unfortunately, NYC real estate in general is expensive. I moved out to Brooklyn in search of slightly cheaper rent, and now I only pay $700 a month for an apartment I share with two roommates. I think it was worth it to live in the student housing my first year; if I had lived out in Bushwick from the start, it would have been harder for me to get to know as many people as I do already. Many of my friends were already living in the city when they started law school, so they kept their Manhattan apartments, but as someone from out of state I think it was a good choice for me.

I am in the top 10%.
[/quote]

Everyone I know at Dozo is in the top 10% and absolutely KILLING IT job wise. I'm just worried about what happens if I'm not in the top 10%, what do my prospects look like then?

tnovak894
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 12:02 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby tnovak894 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:42 pm

DozoLawStudent wrote:
Hi All,

Saw this post and figured this would be a good place to start. I am currently a 2L at Cardozo, so I feel like I can provide some insight to this discussion. When I was choosing what law school to go to, I was deciding between Cardozo, Fordham, American, George Washington, and Boulder. I chose Cardozo for the scholarship money, even though I was admitted to higher-ranked schools, and I do not regret it. I have had opportunities to work as a research assistant and a teaching assistant; I'm the new Senior Notes editor for the Law Review; I have a summer associate position at Akin Gump; and overall I have incredible relationships with the faculty at this school.

We have had plenty of students work outside of NY; many students choose to clerk for federal circuit court judges around the country, and students also end up with jobs both in the private and public sectors across the country. I know people who have gone to work at the Southern Poverty Law Center, the ACLU, government agencies in DC, law firms in Chicago and LA . . . the options are vast.

Regarding the ethos of hardworking Cardozo students, I agree that we have that reputation in the field. Cardozo is a young school looking to move up in the rankings and establish its position in the law school world, and students who graduate are eager to represent a law school that shaped them to be talented, respectful, and yes, hardworking law students.

I have had an incredible experience with the alum network at Cardozo. When going through the On Campus Interview process, I connected with many alums eager to see more Cardozo students at their law firms. In securing my summer associate position, I had five Cardozo alums reach out to me from Akin to see if I wanted to meet and discuss the firm. They are out there in force and they are excited to usher in more Cardozo graduates. Admittedly, there are fewer Cardozo students in law firms than students from Harvard, Yale, Columbia, etc., but part of that is due to how young we are as compared to these other schools. When it comes to the firms our students get into, there is no firm that is unwilling to accept Cardozo students. In my class year alone, we have students going to incredibly prestigious firms--Cravath, Kirkland, Cleary, Sullivan Cromwell, Skadden, Latham, Simpson, etc. If that is something you want, Cardozo can help you get there.

I'd love to help all of you out in making this choice. I remember how difficult it was for me, and I wish I had been able to speak to more students before making this decision. I understand the concerns articulated on this page--rankings, alum network, furniture stacked in the corner (it was only there to accommodate the reception on the third floor), older facilities, etc.You can ask me anything, I will answer honestly. I just don't want anyone's decision to be made based on misconceptions or fears of missed opportunities.


Hi! First let me start off thanking you for your post and giving insight to prospective students. It really does say something about yourself that you are willing to offer help even when you are already in school and have secured a job. Secondly, congrats on the summer at Akin, really good stuff!! I was going to pm you for my questions, but I will post it publicly, as your answers may help other tls readers.

1. As a student that got a biglaw job, did you get that from OCI or in another venue? And did you have any "connection" to help get you the initial interview?

2. I assume that you are in the top of your class, and with that being said... what did you feel it took to get there? In regards to in class participation, conversing with professors, and overall workload and study time. ( I know this is a hard question to answer, but any insight is appreciated to get an idea of what it takes).

3. Considering that not everyone that wants it, will get biglaw (the reality), what are the options for students that want to work in a lawfirm in regards to going to midsize firms, or smaller ones (yet not sole-practices)? How is dozo with getting these positions, and do these firms even hire directly out of law school?

Thanks for anything you can offer...

DozoLawStudent
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:56 am

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby DozoLawStudent » Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:28 pm

Charlie802 wrote:
Everyone I know at Dozo is in the top 10% and absolutely KILLING IT job wise. I'm just worried about what happens if I'm not in the top 10%, what do my prospects look like then?


You definitely don't have to be top 10% to get a job. It helps if you are interested in big law, but I also know people who didn't make top 10% and are still going into big law. In that situation, they likely got there because they networked their butts off haha.I don't think it's possible to downplay the importance of networking when it comes to law jobs--public or private, the more people you know the better off you'll be.

If you're not dead set on big law, there are lots of other options, regardless of grades. Public interest jobs aren't particularly interested in your grades unless you're going into a big government office. They do care about how much you're invested in the subject, and what activities you've taken part in before and during law school to show that interest. There are also lots of opportunities for medium-sized and boutique law firms, and those also have looser requirements for grades.

Charlie802
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:56 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:39 pm

DozoLawStudent wrote:
Charlie802 wrote:
Everyone I know at Dozo is in the top 10% and absolutely KILLING IT job wise. I'm just worried about what happens if I'm not in the top 10%, what do my prospects look like then?


You definitely don't have to be top 10% to get a job. It helps if you are interested in big law, but I also know people who didn't make top 10% and are still going into big law. In that situation, they likely got there because they networked their butts off haha.I don't think it's possible to downplay the importance of networking when it comes to law jobs--public or private, the more people you know the better off you'll be.

If you're not dead set on big law, there are lots of other options, regardless of grades. Public interest jobs aren't particularly interested in your grades unless you're going into a big government office. They do care about how much you're invested in the subject, and what activities you've taken part in before and during law school to show that interest. There are also lots of opportunities for medium-sized and boutique law firms, and those also have looser requirements for grades.


Thanks for the feedback! I'm definitely interested in big law and obviously hope to be in the top 10%.

How did you get your job? OCI or through connections?

DozoLawStudent
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:56 am

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby DozoLawStudent » Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:51 pm

tnovak894 wrote:
Hi! First let me start off thanking you for your post and giving insight to prospective students. It really does say something about yourself that you are willing to offer help even when you are already in school and have secured a job. Secondly, congrats on the summer at Akin, really good stuff!! I was going to pm you for my questions, but I will post it publicly, as your answers may help other tls readers.

1. As a student that got a biglaw job, did you get that from OCI or in another venue? And did you have any "connection" to help get you the initial interview?

2. I assume that you are in the top of your class, and with that being said... what did you feel it took to get there? In regards to in class participation, conversing with professors, and overall workload and study time. ( I know this is a hard question to answer, but any insight is appreciated to get an idea of what it takes).

3. Considering that not everyone that wants it, will get biglaw (the reality), what are the options for students that want to work in a lawfirm in regards to going to midsize firms, or smaller ones (yet not sole-practices)? How is dozo with getting these positions, and do these firms even hire directly out of law school?

Thanks for anything you can offer...


1. I got my job through the OCI process at Cardozo, and that is where most people end up getting their big law jobs. Students who have connections are offered interviews before the OCI process, but that isn't all that typical. I learned about Akin through my property TA in the spring of my 1L year, and he introduced me to a Cardozo alum that works in corporate at Akin. She in turn introduced me to another alum who works in litigation (where I want to go), and then when I got to the interview I was able to speak about those three people. So it's not like I had an inside connection per se, but I took advantage of all of the coffee opportunities to get to know more people and get my name out there. that being said, I was also offered a position at two other firms where I did no networking, so who knows exactly whether all the coffee meetings were helpful.

2. I think my Civil Procedure professor said it best: make sure, at the end of your 1L year, that you have no regrets. I know that sounds corny now, but it should be your life mantra for your first year in law school. There will be many times when you may want to slack off on the reading, or stay quiet in class because your tired, but you don't want to finish your first year of law school wishing you'd worked just that little bit harder. A lot rests on your first year of law school, and while it can definitely be a lot of work you will feel incredible if you can come out of it proud of what you accomplished.
Another thing to work out is study habits. My first semester I tried to work in a study group of five people, and it was way too much for me. I did a little bit of teaching other people what I figured out, a lot of arguing, but in the end we all were such different learners that it didn't help me. Since then, I have one person that I study with, and it is way better. We both have the same study strategies, and we each challenge each other in ways that get us to higher levels of understanding than we could have reached on our own.
Finally, be okay with being a "gunner". For some reason our society places this weird stigma on contributing in class or asking a question, as though such behavior turns you into a geeky over-achiever and brown nose. FIGHT THE STIGMA. The professors at Cardozo are some of the most brilliant and talented people I know, and if you are willing to contribute in their class and visit their office hours you will learn an incredible amount. If you're going to spend three years of your life in law school, take full advantage of every opportunity to learn from these incredible people.

3. OCI does not just cater to big law; we also have a few weeks of on campus interviewing for medium and small law firms. Aside from that, a lot of firms will post job opportunities on our school's job website, and I know many students who have secured positions that way. While not all of them do, many offer positions directly out of law school. A good way to get your foot in the door is to use Cardozo's externship program; people will often extern for a firm for a semester or two, and then will be offered a full-time position upon graduation (or a summer associate position if they externed during their 2L year).

Hope this was helpful!

tnovak894
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 12:02 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby tnovak894 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:56 pm

DozoLawStudent wrote:
tnovak894 wrote:
Hi! First let me start off thanking you for your post and giving insight to prospective students. It really does say something about yourself that you are willing to offer help even when you are already in school and have secured a job. Secondly, congrats on the summer at Akin, really good stuff!! I was going to pm you for my questions, but I will post it publicly, as your answers may help other tls readers.

1. As a student that got a biglaw job, did you get that from OCI or in another venue? And did you have any "connection" to help get you the initial interview?

2. I assume that you are in the top of your class, and with that being said... what did you feel it took to get there? In regards to in class participation, conversing with professors, and overall workload and study time. ( I know this is a hard question to answer, but any insight is appreciated to get an idea of what it takes).

3. Considering that not everyone that wants it, will get biglaw (the reality), what are the options for students that want to work in a lawfirm in regards to going to midsize firms, or smaller ones (yet not sole-practices)? How is dozo with getting these positions, and do these firms even hire directly out of law school?

Thanks for anything you can offer...


1. I got my job through the OCI process at Cardozo, and that is where most people end up getting their big law jobs. Students who have connections are offered interviews before the OCI process, but that isn't all that typical. I learned about Akin through my property TA in the spring of my 1L year, and he introduced me to a Cardozo alum that works in corporate at Akin. She in turn introduced me to another alum who works in litigation (where I want to go), and then when I got to the interview I was able to speak about those three people. So it's not like I had an inside connection per se, but I took advantage of all of the coffee opportunities to get to know more people and get my name out there. that being said, I was also offered a position at two other firms where I did no networking, so who knows exactly whether all the coffee meetings were helpful.

2. I think my Civil Procedure professor said it best: make sure, at the end of your 1L year, that you have no regrets. I know that sounds corny now, but it should be your life mantra for your first year in law school. There will be many times when you may want to slack off on the reading, or stay quiet in class because your tired, but you don't want to finish your first year of law school wishing you'd worked just that little bit harder. A lot rests on your first year of law school, and while it can definitely be a lot of work you will feel incredible if you can come out of it proud of what you accomplished.
Another thing to work out is study habits. My first semester I tried to work in a study group of five people, and it was way too much for me. I did a little bit of teaching other people what I figured out, a lot of arguing, but in the end we all were such different learners that it didn't help me. Since then, I have one person that I study with, and it is way better. We both have the same study strategies, and we each challenge each other in ways that get us to higher levels of understanding than we could have reached on our own.
Finally, be okay with being a "gunner". For some reason our society places this weird stigma on contributing in class or asking a question, as though such behavior turns you into a geeky over-achiever and brown nose. FIGHT THE STIGMA. The professors at Cardozo are some of the most brilliant and talented people I know, and if you are willing to contribute in their class and visit their office hours you will learn an incredible amount. If you're going to spend three years of your life in law school, take full advantage of every opportunity to learn from these incredible people.

3. OCI does not just cater to big law; we also have a few weeks of on campus interviewing for medium and small law firms. Aside from that, a lot of firms will post job opportunities on our school's job website, and I know many students who have secured positions that way. While not all of them do, many offer positions directly out of law school. A good way to get your foot in the door is to use Cardozo's externship program; people will often extern for a firm for a semester or two, and then will be offered a full-time position upon graduation (or a summer associate position if they externed during their 2L year).

Hope this was helpful!


Very helpful, thanks so much for taking the time!

Charlie802
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:56 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Fri Mar 17, 2017 2:02 pm

tnovak894 wrote:
DozoLawStudent wrote:
tnovak894 wrote:
Hi! First let me start off thanking you for your post and giving insight to prospective students. It really does say something about yourself that you are willing to offer help even when you are already in school and have secured a job. Secondly, congrats on the summer at Akin, really good stuff!! I was going to pm you for my questions, but I will post it publicly, as your answers may help other tls readers.

1. As a student that got a biglaw job, did you get that from OCI or in another venue? And did you have any "connection" to help get you the initial interview?

2. I assume that you are in the top of your class, and with that being said... what did you feel it took to get there? In regards to in class participation, conversing with professors, and overall workload and study time. ( I know this is a hard question to answer, but any insight is appreciated to get an idea of what it takes).

3. Considering that not everyone that wants it, will get biglaw (the reality), what are the options for students that want to work in a lawfirm in regards to going to midsize firms, or smaller ones (yet not sole-practices)? How is dozo with getting these positions, and do these firms even hire directly out of law school?

Thanks for anything you can offer...


1. I got my job through the OCI process at Cardozo, and that is where most people end up getting their big law jobs. Students who have connections are offered interviews before the OCI process, but that isn't all that typical. I learned about Akin through my property TA in the spring of my 1L year, and he introduced me to a Cardozo alum that works in corporate at Akin. She in turn introduced me to another alum who works in litigation (where I want to go), and then when I got to the interview I was able to speak about those three people. So it's not like I had an inside connection per se, but I took advantage of all of the coffee opportunities to get to know more people and get my name out there. that being said, I was also offered a position at two other firms where I did no networking, so who knows exactly whether all the coffee meetings were helpful.

2. I think my Civil Procedure professor said it best: make sure, at the end of your 1L year, that you have no regrets. I know that sounds corny now, but it should be your life mantra for your first year in law school. There will be many times when you may want to slack off on the reading, or stay quiet in class because your tired, but you don't want to finish your first year of law school wishing you'd worked just that little bit harder. A lot rests on your first year of law school, and while it can definitely be a lot of work you will feel incredible if you can come out of it proud of what you accomplished.
Another thing to work out is study habits. My first semester I tried to work in a study group of five people, and it was way too much for me. I did a little bit of teaching other people what I figured out, a lot of arguing, but in the end we all were such different learners that it didn't help me. Since then, I have one person that I study with, and it is way better. We both have the same study strategies, and we each challenge each other in ways that get us to higher levels of understanding than we could have reached on our own.
Finally, be okay with being a "gunner". For some reason our society places this weird stigma on contributing in class or asking a question, as though such behavior turns you into a geeky over-achiever and brown nose. FIGHT THE STIGMA. The professors at Cardozo are some of the most brilliant and talented people I know, and if you are willing to contribute in their class and visit their office hours you will learn an incredible amount. If you're going to spend three years of your life in law school, take full advantage of every opportunity to learn from these incredible people.

3. OCI does not just cater to big law; we also have a few weeks of on campus interviewing for medium and small law firms. Aside from that, a lot of firms will post job opportunities on our school's job website, and I know many students who have secured positions that way. While not all of them do, many offer positions directly out of law school. A good way to get your foot in the door is to use Cardozo's externship program; people will often extern for a firm for a semester or two, and then will be offered a full-time position upon graduation (or a summer associate position if they externed during their 2L year).

Hope this was helpful!


Very helpful, thanks so much for taking the time!


+1

Thank you! Disregard my question above, more than answered it here. I'm going to keep my options open when I visit in a few weeks. Thank you again!

legaljargon29
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2016 9:39 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby legaljargon29 » Sun Mar 19, 2017 12:18 pm

Anyone have any luck with negotiating scholarship yet? I am still waiting to hear back after submitting a competing offer a month ago. Also, is there a FB group?

Charlie802
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:56 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Sun Mar 19, 2017 1:04 pm

legaljargon29 wrote:Anyone have any luck with negotiating scholarship yet? I am still waiting to hear back after submitting a competing offer a month ago. Also, is there a FB group?


Still waiting. Submitted a request back in Jan/feb (can't remember but it's been a while.

Not sure about the Facebook group.

User avatar
potus
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2015 12:34 am

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby potus » Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:39 am

Scholarships negotiation responses will be coming in by mid this week and next week. Basically the determining factor whether or not I'm signing that acceptance letter.

Thanks, also, for the 2L that responded earlier. Provided some great insight especially after I walked away from that panel feeling bewildered.

miss.nomer
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2017 12:37 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby miss.nomer » Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:05 pm

baebou wrote:Did anyone else receive an invitation to interview from the Assistant Director of Admissions? This doesn't seem common for Cardozo. I'm guessing they are on the fence about my application.


I received an invitation to interview with her as well. I sent in my application 2 weeks and received the request last week, so it was a pretty quick turnaround. If you've interviewed already, how did it go?

User avatar
potus
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2015 12:34 am

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby potus » Tue Mar 21, 2017 3:21 pm

Just got my scholly bump.

Charlie802
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:56 pm

Re: Cardozo Law C/O 2020

Postby Charlie802 » Tue Mar 21, 2017 4:04 pm

potus wrote:Just got my scholly bump.


What time did the email come? Did they give a good bump?




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