NU Apps '11-'12 - Good Luck Hold Candidates!!!! <3

Share Your Experiences, Read About Other Experiences. Please keep posts organized by school and expected year of graduation.
User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13915
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby rinkrat19 » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:20 pm

Top Ten Reasons to Consider Northwestern Law
from the 2011 Admitted Student Guide

6: Get A Life!
No matter what law school you choose, you’re going to be working awfully hard over the next three years. Your classes will keep you very busy, and you’ll probably have other academic commitments like journals and moot court and clinics, and of course there’s on-campus interviewing and job searches generally…. Your plate will be very full, but that doesn’t mean you can’t have a life. Northwestern Law students are very proactive about maintaining a sense of balance between their academics and their personal pursuits.

Elizabeth Mooney (JD '10) was very involved at her undergraduate institution and was worried that she wouldn’t have time for extracurricular activities in law school. “That is definitely not the case at Northwestern,” she says.

A wide variety of student organizations
There are over 40 student organizations already in existence at the Law School. Whether you’re interested in topical areas of the law (Environmental Law Society, Intellectual Property Law Society, International Law Society, for example), in cultural organizations (BLSA, SALSA, APALSA, LLSA, and more), in culinary pursuits (Epicurean Club, Single Malt Scotch Club), or in the arts (Habeas Chorus, an a cappella group), there’s a student group here for you. You can view a more comprehensive list of student organizations here to see what you might be interested in. If you feel like there’s something missing from the list, no need to fret: New organizations pop up every year. In just the last year or two, our students founded the Martial Arts Society; the Northwestern Association of Wine Tasters Extraordinaire; Race Judicata (a runners’ organization); the Technology and Telecommunications Law Group; The Winter Sports Club; the Middle Eastern Law Students Association; the Business Law Association; a chapter of Phi Alpha Delta; the Real Property, Trusts, and Estates Club; intermural basketball and soccer teams that play against other graduate students; and the Holy Angels (a joint community service organization with Kellogg students).

Student organized programs entertaining as well as educational
Our student organizations put on a plethora of programming every year, from Intellectual Property Law Week to OUTLaw Week to Public Interest Law Week to Federalist Society Week. This week at the Law School is the Women's Law Symposium, organized and sponsored by the Women's Leadership Coalition. The week's keynote speaker is Alice Fisher, a former Assistant Attorney General for the DOJ's Criminal Division. Other presentations include sessions on women in the changing political landscape, women as dealmakers, and a panel featuring two of the three female alums who clerked for Supreme Court Justices during the 2007-2008 term.

The programming is not all academic, either; there’s plenty of fun to be had, too. Every year our students produce Wigmore Follies, a variety show in which students put on humorous skits that poke fun at law school life. Past Follies have been themed “Law Miserables,” “Northwest Side Story,” "NU Confidential," and "Not Another Wigmore Follies." Many of the Law School's professors (including Dean Van Zandt!) are known to make cameos in the production. There’s also an annual SFPIF auction every year (auctioneered by a faculty member), a Barrister’s Ball, and a talent show.

Here at Northwestern Law, involvement in student organizations is far more than just idle distraction or resume decoration.

Sarah Tolly (JD ’10) "Last year I started a new student organization: the Real Property, Trusts & Estates Club. I was interested in learning more about estate planning as a practice area, and felt that Northwestern didn't have a club of this nature. The administration and student bar association made starting a new student group easy, and the club, now in its second year, has been a success! If Northwestern doesn't already have the group you're looking for, it's totally feasible to start a new one!"

Students socialize casually, too
Beyond organized activities, our students find time to just chill. On any given day during the lunch hour, you’ll find students hanging out in the Law School’s Atrium or in Harry’s Cafe, chatting with each other or with professors who dropped in on the conversation. And of course we can’t forget Bar Review: Every Thursday night our students pick a neighborhood in the city and a bar or pub in that neighborhood where they can gather for drinks and conversation.

There’s no doubt that our students are serious about their academics. But they’re also serious about retaining the nonacademic parts of their lives that make them well-rounded and interesting people.



5: Finding the Right Balance

The most important thing any law student expects from their chosen law school is a solid legal education. You’re no doubt expecting (as you should) a rigorous academic curriculum that’s going to get you “to think like a lawyer.” How does that magical and ephemeral transformation process happen, though? Most every law school has some set of required classes designed to get you thinking like a lawyer, but what those classes are and how much say you have in shaping your education beyond those classes may differ vastly from school to school. Here’s your introduction to how it’s done at Northwestern Law.

Think like a lawyer
We think it’s important for our students to be able “to think like lawyers,” but we recognize that our students don’t all want to think like the same lawyer. Our students have diverse academic interests and wide-ranging career goals, so a one-size-fits-all approach to the curriculum just isn’t going to work for the typical Northwestern Law student. Some of our students come to law school wanting to entrench themselves in the ivory tower of the law and to focus on all things theoretical. Other students can’t wait to get their feet wet and want to focus on developing practical skills. What’s most common, though, is for students to want an educational experience that falls somewhere in between those two extremes. Exactly where that happy medium lies is going to differ from student to student. That’s why we give our students the flexibility to determine what skills and educational experiences they need and want, and we allow them to build a curriculum that furthers their individual goals.

First year core curriculum with some choice
Your first year at Northwestern Law is going to give you that rigorous academic curriculum that will begin the transformation from thinking like a layperson to thinking like a lawyer. Our core curriculum consists of one semester each of Contracts, Torts, Civil Procedure, Criminal Law, Property, Constitutional Law, and two semesters of Communication and Legal Reasoning. We could hardly call ourselves flexible, though, if we didn’t give you at least some choice in your first year! During your second semester, you’ll choose two electives. One elective can be a doctrinal class (such as Corporations or International Law). The other elective can be an interdisciplinary class (we call it a “perspective elective”) that asks you to look at the law through the lens of another discipline. Or, you can enroll in the combination that you prefer. (You will need to take a perspective elective before you graduate, but that’s a requirement that can be completed in your upper class years – it’s up to you.)

Choices open up second and third years
Once you get beyond your first year, you’re really going to have to decide what kinds of experiences are important to you in structuring your legal education. You’ll have a lot of options.

Kristen Knapp (JD '10) "Northwestern offers classes that cater to different learning experiences each semester and I've really enjoyed being able to take doctrinal classes at the same time as taking more skills-oriented classes. During the fall of my 2L year I took Administrative Law and at the same time was able to take Introduction to Trial Advocacy, where I learned how to do opening statements and closing arguments as well as cross-examinations. This spring I'm really looking forward to working on a Senior Research project with Professor Speta about censorship and WTO regulations while at the same time externing in the U.S. Attorney's Office downtown."

You might want exposure to the world of academia through our Senior Research Program, in which you work one-on-one with a faculty member on a substantive piece of your own research; by participating on one of our six scholarly journals; or by engaging in intensive upper-level seminars (the average class size of upper level courses is 20-25 students). If you decide you're really serious about a career in academia, you might consider the Northwestern Law Scholars Program, through which students develop the theoretical and methodological skills necessary for careers in legal teaching

You'll have options for building practical skills by working for one of the many centers of the Bluhm Legal Clinic, where you can help represent live clients; by completing an externship with a judge, a public service organization, a prosecutor's or defender's office, or corporate counsel's office; or by taking classes through our simulation-based curriculum, such as Negotiation or Trial Advocacy.

If you choose to do so, you can focus your studies on a particular discipline by completing an academic concentration in Business Enterprise, Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution, International Law, or Law and Social Policy, or by pursing a joint JD-LLM in International Human Rights or JD-LLM in Taxation. Any of these curricular concentrations still leave you plenty of time for electives in other subject areas.

You can explore the globalization of the legal marketplace through an International Team Project, a study abroad program, or through a semester- or summer-long international law internship abroad at the International Criminal Court and other war crimes tribunals, the Supreme Courts of India and Israel, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, or the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights.

These various academic experiences are not mutually exclusive; you can choose a little from here and a little from there. Most students will end up with a nice mix of all of the above, but the mix looks different for each person. If all of these options and the possible permutations seem overwhelmning to you now, don't fret: We have academic counselors available who can help you you evaluate your options and choose classes and experiences that will complement your interests and that will prepare you to succeed in law school and beyond. Whether you seek guidance or whether you blaze your own trail, we know you'll create your own unique curriculum that provides the perfect balance for your own individual goals.

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13915
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby rinkrat19 » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:24 pm

Top Ten Reasons to Consider Northwestern Law
from the 2011 Admitted Student Guide


4: Students Shape the Law School's Future
At Northwestern Law, we’re lucky to have smart, motivated students who are looking to make the most out of their experience, who have the dedication and follow-through to get things done, and who want to make the Law School a better place. Our students take advantage of the wonderful opportunities the Law School has to offer, but they’re also not shy about speaking up when they see areas for improvement or growth and are willing to help shape the resolution.

Kate Riordan (JD LLM in International Human Rights '13) "I'm in a brand new joint degree program and have been really impressed with how much guidance and counseling that I've been given. The doors to the administration are always open - and they are really receptive to any concerns or ideas that the students have."

Contributing to change
Northwestern Law students work closely with the administration to direct the future of the Law School. For example, the Student Bar Association (“SBA”) meets weekly with Dean Van Zandt and the Dean of Students to discuss issues affecting the students’ law school experience. Students sit on committees pertaining to nearly every aspect of the Law School, including faculty hiring and retention, career strategy, admissions, curriculum, technology, facilities, health care, and other important areas. More generally, though, any student with an idea or suggestion is encouraged to bring that idea to the administration.

A recent SBA Vice President of Finance says, “My position in the SBA has given me an inside look at how effective Northwestern Law students really are at getting things done around school. You’d be amazed at the things students want to do – and actually do – around here. These endeavors range from getting a ‘gentler’ brand of toilet paper for the bathrooms to improving the wireless connectivity on campus. The deans and other administrators are all extremely responsive to the students’ needs.”

Our students are right now in the process of applying for our annual spring Leadership Retreat. The purpose of the Leadership Retreat is two-fold. First, it's geared toward helping students develop their leadership abilitites and may include sessions on topics such as team building or dispute resolution. Second, it allows students to convene to brainstorm ideas for change and development in student life at the Law School. The Retreat culminates in a presentation by the students to faculty, staff, and administration on their ideas for the following year.

Students have initiated new programs
There are several unique programs that exist at the Law School due in large part to the innovation of students. The International Team Projects course (ITPs) is something that students worked with faculty to develop in 1998 as an alternative to the traditional study abroad programs. (Students in ITPs this spring will leave two weeks from now for trips to Argentina, Egypt, Morocco, Tanzania, and South Africa.) Northwestern’s Public Service Strategy, which encourages every student to give a specified number of hours of service per year to the community before they graduate, was something that our students created together with faculty and administrators.



3: You Want to Learn from Really Smart (But Really Nice) People

What is it that you’re looking for in law school faculty? Are you looking for world renowned scholars who are experts in their fields and who happen to be approachable and who are interested in engaging with students? It might sound like a tall order to fill, but here at Northwestern Law, we think we’ve done it.

Kevin F. King (JD '10) "I have been really impressed with the interaction I've had with professors outside of the classroom. While my professors have always been willing to answer questions after class, during office hours, or via e-mail, I have been able to build great personal relationships with a few professors over dinner and drinks or by going out bowling with the professor and a group of classmates."

It goes without saying that you expect any top law school to deliver a first-rate faculty with an impressive list of publications and demonstrated expertise in the areas they teach. Here’s just a small sampling of our faculty members who are preeminent in their fields:

Martin Redish: One of the nation’s top constitutional scholars and a frequent expert witness before the House and Senate. He is the 16th most cited legal scholar of all time, according to Hein Online. Professor Redish generally teaches a section of Civil Procedure and/or Constitutional Law every year.

Dorothy Roberts: A frequent speaker and prolific scholar on issues related to race, gender, and the law. She’s published more than sixty articles and essays in books and scholarly journals, has authored two award-winning books, and has co-edited five casebooks and anthologies. Professor Roberts is a frequent faculty advisor for Senior Research Projects and is currently conducting her own research on race-based biotechnologies (she's teaching a seminar on this subject right now) and on the effects of child welfare agency involvement in African-American neighborhoods.

David Scheffer: Former Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues who led the U.S. delegation in U.N. talks establishing the International Criminal Court. Professor Scheffer is the Director of the Center for International Human Rights and was recently the faculty sponsor for an International Team Project ("ITP") in Cambodia.

Lee Epstein: A Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Political and Social Science. A preeminent scholar on the Supreme Court, she’s received ten grants from the National Science Foundation for her work on judicial politics and has authored, co-authored, or edited over seventy articles and essays, as well as thirteen books.

Steven Lubet: Author of the most widely used text on trial advocacy. Professor Lubet heads our trial advocacy program and served as the auctioneer for the Student Funded Public Interest Fellowship (“SFPIF”) Program’s annual fundraising auction for over a decade. (That's him in the picture at the top of the page!)

Stephen Presser: Senior author of the most widely used text on American Legal History. Professor Presser generally teaches a course on American Legal History each spring.

Daniel Fischel: An expert on corporations, corporate finance, and the regulation of financial markets. His book, The Economic Structure of Corporate Law, which he co-authored with Judge Frank Easterbrook, is the most cited book in legal scholarship, and Professor Fischel himself is the 10th most cited legal scholar of all time according to Hein Online.

Locke Bowman: Based on votes from fellow attorneys, Chicago Magazine named Professor Bowman an Illinois “Super Lawyer” in 2005 and 2006 for his work in constitutional law and civil rights. Professor Bowman is the Director of the MacArthur Justice Center and has been the faculty advisor for recent ITPs to India and Egypt.

Joe Marguiles: Lead counsel in Rasul v. Bush, involving the detentions at the Guantánamo Bay Naval Station, and in Habib v. Bush, involving the rendition of Mamdouh Habib from Pakistan to Egypt. Professor Marguiles testified in 2005 at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on detainee issues. His book, Guantánamo and the Abuse of Presidential Power, won the prestigious Silver Gavel Award of 2007, given each year by the American Bar Association to the book that best promotes “the American public's understanding of the law and the legal system.” It also won the Scribes Award of 2007, given each year by the American Association of Legal Writers for the best work of legal scholarship. Professor Marguiles is the Assistant Director of the MacArthur Justice Center.

Shari Diamond: A lawyer and psychologist who is one of the foremost empirical researchers on the jury process and legal decision-making. She’s also a research fellow at the American Bar Foundation. Professor Diamond is currently conducting a pathbreaking research project on actual jury deliberations in the Arizona state courts.

Steven Drizin: Has expertise in representing children and adolescents charged with crimes in the juvenile and criminal courts of Cook County. Professor Drizin has appeared as a commentator on Nightline with Ted Koppel, the Jim Lehrer Show, Chicago Tonight with John Calloway, Fox News's "In Depth" Program, ABC Nightly News, National Public Radio's All Things Considered, and numerous other local and national television and radio news programs. Professor Drizin is Director of the Center on Wrongful Convictions and maintains a blog on his work in the area of false confessions.

Great student-faculty ratio keeps students engaged
Of course, as a student, all this expertise among our faculty only benefits you if you actually have access to the professors. That’s why we maintain an 11:1 student-faculty ratio (which drops to less than 8:1 when you include research and clinical faculty) and why our faculty members have open door policies in addition to office hours. We also have a Senior Research Program through which over fifty third-year students every year are paired with a faculty member who provides individualized supervision on a research project of the student’s own choosing.

Events encourage informal student-faculty socializing
What about outside of the classroom? A couple years ago, SFPIF started what has become a new Halloween tradition around the Law School. Each year, students are given the opportunity to bid on which professor they want to see teach class in an outrageous costume, chosen by SFPIF. Two professors volunteered for the inaugural contest, and in the last two years, the field of nominees has expanded to five professors. So far, our students have voted to put Civil Procedure Professor Richard Hoskins in a pink Care Bear costume, Torts professor Michael Zimmer in a gorilla outfit, and Property professor David Cameron in an Elvis suit.

Professors initiate social outings and meals with studentsAfter graduating from a small liberal arts college where opportunities to interact closely with professors were endless, Elizabeth Mooney (JD '10) worried that she wouldn't be able to develop similarly close relationships with her law professors. However, she's found that couldn't be further from the truth. Elizabeth says, "I loved that Professor Redish took everyone in our Civil Procedure class out in small groups of five students or less for coffee or a beer. He invited us to talk about anything and everything, from law school to life in general. The only thing we weren't allowed to discuss was Civil Procedure!" Elizabeth also feels that the level of support and encouragement she receives from her professors is incredible. She says, "I passed my Torts professor in the hall one day after he had called on me in class. Totally unprompted, he said, 'Great job today, Elizabeth. You really understood that case.' Another of my professors writes handwritten notes thanking students when they make a good point in class and also takes any student who can answer tough trivia questions out to lunch at the Museum of Contemporary Art."
Last edited by rinkrat19 on Wed Oct 19, 2011 3:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13915
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby rinkrat19 » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:26 pm

Top Ten Reasons to Consider Northwestern Law
from the 2011 Admitted Student Guide


2: You Want Options

Most of the prospective law students we meet have a vague idea of possible areas of law they might like to practice when they graduate, but they’re really counting on their experience in law school to expose them to their options and help them nail down their interests. More importantly, they want to know that a degree from whatever law school they choose to attend is going to position them well in the legal marketplace and will help them get the job they decide they want three years from now. So let’s ask the million dollar question: Can Northwestern Law do that for you? We obviously think so, but you be the judge:

What if you want to do a judicial clerkship?
Let’s start with the big kahuna – The Supreme Court. Northwestern Law is 6th per capita in terms of placing graduates in Supreme Court clerkships. During the last Supreme Court term, one-third of the Court's Justices had a Northwestern Law alum as a clerk: Justices Stevens, Kennedy, and Alito each had a clerk who graduated from Northwestern Law. Two years ago, one of our graduates clerked for Justice Scalia. Over the past decade or so, eleven of our alums have served Justices on the Supreme Court.

Of course, the best way to get to the Supreme Court is to start by serving on a lower court. Last year, 40 of our graduates secured clerkships, and this year, 31 graduates have secured clerkships. We also have a judicial externship program, through which roughly 65-75 students per year work for federal district court judges around the country and receive academic credit for the experience. That’s a pretty useful item for your resume when you go to apply for post-graduate clerkships!

The Law School is going to give you a lot of institutional support as you go through the clerkship application process. We have a Faculty Clerkship Committee so that you’ll have a faculty advisor to help guide you through the application process. We also have a clerkship advisor in our Career Strategy and Advancement Center. When it comes time to send out your applications, the Career Center is going to provide you with several important support services. First, they’re going to serve as a clearing house for your letters of recommendation (think of them as your in-house LSDAS). Second, they’re going to Fed Ex your applications to the judges for you, at no expense to you. Depending on your individual application strategy, you may end up sending out over 100 applications. Think about it: That’s 100 applications that you don’t have to pay to Fed Ex to judges across the country! The Career Center also maintains a database of alums who have clerked and the judges they worked for, as well as a database of students who have interviewed with various judges. When you score an interview, you can call an alum who worked for that judge or a student who interviewed with the judge and talk to them about the experience and what to expect. Most anyone who’s gone through clerkship interviews will tell you that you don’t necessarily know what you’re walking into ahead of time, so talking to an alum or another student who’s been there can give you a huge leg up on the competition.

What if you want to work in public interest?
Wouldn’t it be nice if there was someone on campus who had actually built a career in public interest whose sole mission was to support students who also want to work in public interest and to help them shape a long-term career plan and job application strategy? We think it would be. That’s why we have Cindy Wilson, our public interest advisor. Cindy’s main goal is to work individually with public interest oriented students to help them formulate their job search. Northwestern Law also hosts the Midwest Public Interest Career Conference every year, where public interest employers from throughout the Midwest come to our campus to interview law students.

The main concern of students considering public interest work seems to be, “Am I going to be able to afford to do this work if I have to repay my law school debt?” We’re doing what we can to help you make your employment decision based on personal interests instead of finances. We think we offer one of the most generous and flexible loan forgiveness programs in the industry, our Public Service Fellowship Program (“PSFP”). The PSFP is an annual forgiveable fellowship for students who work in qualifying public service positions, which include not only traditional legal aid positions, but also legal and managerial work in government and non-profits. (Future academics might also be interested to know that positions in academia qualify for loan forgiveness through the PSFP.) The salary cap to qualify for the program is $60,000, and the student’s contribution to loan repayment maxes out at 8% of annual income. Depending on your income level and amount of debt, the PSFP will contribute up to $13,000 per year and up to $130,000 over 10 years to your debt repayment.

What if you want to go into private practice?
Do you know which firm you want to work for? Not necessarily? Okay, that’s understandable. We’ll just have to give you a smorgasbord to choose from. How does 800 sound?

Yeah, we’re not kidding. Our fall on-campus interviewing program draws employers from over 800 offices worldwide. There are large firms, medium firms, small firms, boutiques, government agencies, and more.

In addition to our on-campus interviewing program, we have resume collection and distribution programs and several job fairs that our students attend. Our students average about 20 first-round interviews each.

Geographic Flexibility
Do you know where in the country (or world, for that matter) you want to work? Probably? But maybe not? We’d be willing to bet that at one point or another, you’ve asked yourself whether a law degree from Northwestern will trap you in the Midwest after school. The answer is a definitive no: The vast majority of our on-campus recruiters (about 75%) come from outside the Midwest, and roughly half of our students choose to leave the Midwest when they graduate.

In case the statistics don’t persuade you, here’s some anecdotal evidence from Ashley Mangus (JD ’10): “I was concerned about how difficult it would be to get a job in California, especially because the market I was looking at has a reputation for being small and hard to break in to. But, it turns out I didn’t have any trouble at all getting callbacks or offers for summer employment. Firms from San Francisco were very interested in recruiting at Northwestern Law; in fact, I always found life in Chicago (especially the weather!) to be a great talking point in my San Francisco interviews.”

Helping You Get the Job You Want
It doesn’t do our students much good if we assemble all these opportunities for them but fail to help them prepare to capitalize on them. We can help create opportunities for you, but the fact of the matter is that you have to land the job for yourself. That’s why we try to maintain one of the best student/counselor ratios of any law school in the country, and our professional career advisors (all of whom have law degrees) offer resume review, interview counseling, networking training, and unlimited advising sessions to help you master the interpersonal and presentation skills you’re going to need to impress employers. Bill Chamberlain, Assistant Dean of the Career Strategy Center, encourages students to visit their career advisors early and often. According to Bill, “The most important service we provide to our students is unlimited one-on-one counseling sessions with our JD counselors. We make an effort to get to know all our advisees and to work with them to create personalized strategies to obtain satisfying jobs.”

Kevin King (JD '10) describes his experience with the career counseling he's received as follows: "Northwestern Law has exceeded all of my expectations regarding job opportunities. I lived in Washington, D.C. before law school and am planning to return there for work. The one-on-one career counseling has been really helpful, and I was impressed with the number and quality of the employers coming to our on-campus interviews in the fall."

Helping You Get the Next Job You Want
The reality of today’s legal marketplace is that it’s becoming rare for lawyers to begin and end their careers at the same employer. Most law school graduates have what Dean Van Zandt calls “multi-job careers.” Our Career Center is going to remain available to you once you graduate. In fact, one of our career advisors is dedicated to working with alums and the special considerations they face as they change and advance their careers. We of course want to help you find that first job after graduation, but we also recognize that your job search won’t necessarily end there, and we’ll be with you for the long run.

In conclusion...
What we’ve given you here is just a snapshot of the major areas students tend to inquire about as they prepare to enter law school. This is by no means an exhaustive list of the career options our graduates pursue or of the institutional support available to our students during their career search. We’re also going to be honest with you, though, and call a spade a spade: We don’t think there’s a law school career advisor on earth who can 100% guarantee you that you’ll have your first-choice job when you graduate. We don’t pretend that the job search is going to be easy going for everyone. What we do promise you, though, is that we will work tirelessly to identify and create opportunities for you, and we will help prepare you to the best extent possible to capitalize on those opportunities. We understand that you want options. You may know now what options you want; you may discover that you want more, or different, options during law school. Whatever it is you decide you want, we’re going to do our all to help you get there.



1: Northwestern Law Students Are… HAPPY!

The number one reason why we think students should (and do) choose Northwestern Law isn’t something that can be quantified. It isn’t something we can measure through medians or percentages and report to the ABA or U.S. News.

The number one reason why you should consider choosing Northwestern Law is because our students are happy here.

Yes, we know it sounds corny. After all, you have important and concrete things to consider about where you go to law school, like student-faculty ratios, employment statistics, and number of electives offered. We understand that, at least when compared to other, more quantifiable factors, your general happiness over the next three years might seem ethereal, hard to determine, secondary, and perhaps even unlikely. Even though we think the question should be at the top of every law school applicant’s list, we’re surprised by how rarely we hear prospective law students ask, “Are the students at your school happy?”

Although it may be hard to believe given what you’ve heard about law school, not all law students are miserable. They certainly work hard, and they’re busy, but they’re not all hating life. At least, Northwestern Law students don’t seem to be. Professor Janice Nadler has observed, “Students who are here find themselves in a top law school, at a great university, in a wonderful city, and, as a result of that, everybody here is very happy, and it shows. I think that attitude is contagious.”

The people you meet here make all the difference
Libby O'Neill (JD '11) had high expectations for the academic experience she would have at Northwestern, but she wasn't sure what to expect from her classmates. As she explains, "I knew I would be exposed to brilliant professors and outstanding academic opportunities when I chose Northwestern for law school. What I could never have imagined is that I'd make so many close friends so quickly. My classmates are the people I study with, go out with, and know I will be in touch with for the rest of my life. To me, the people really make the Northwestern Law difference, and they make this a better place for learning - and living - than any other law school I visited."

Derek Linkous (JD '11) has been pleasantly surprised by the support he's received from his classmates during his 1L year: "I was taken aback by how quickly and willingly people wanted to get to know one another and hang out with one another outside of school, both early on and throughout the semester. I expected people to be friendly at the begninning and then fall into their own groups or withdraw somewhat later on, but every day, people are genuinely interested in what is going on in their classmates lives outside the classroom, which has been a huge positive for me in my law school experience."

Elizabeth Mooney (JD '10) accounts for the atmosphere at Northwestern this way: "Students at Northwestern are happy. Don't get me wrong, law school is not all sunshine and glee. You will work hard, you will have some long nights, and there's going to be stress. The difference at Northwestern is that, when you're working hard, you're working hard because it's interesting work or because your professor is so amazing that you don't want to let him or her down. And when you have a long night, chances are that the SBA will have a late-night snack break complete with cookies, brownies, and other people with whom you can commiserate. And when you're stressed, you can rest assured that there is always an open door and a friendly face - someone who's ready to help you in any way possible. On top of all that, your classmates will be some of the most wonderful people you will ever meet. So yes, people here are happy. There's really no reason not to be!"

Our Final WordWe’ve spent the last nine weeks trying to give you loads of information on our amazing location, stellar academic opportunities, outstanding professors, collegial community, and abundant career opportunities. Is all of that important? Yes, of course… otherwise, we wouldn’t have spent nine weeks telling you about it! What’s most important, though, is that you find an environment in which you’re going to be happy enough and comfortable enough to take advantage of all those amazing opportunities to the fullest.

Sometimes it seems to us like prospective law students are willing to let their general happiness take a back seat to law school rankings or median starting salaries or other “hard” factors. If you stop and think about it, though, you’re probably considering several schools that have excellent faculty, strong academic programs, and solid employment rates. You’re most likely going to get a stellar legal education at whichever law school you choose. So, why not think about where you’re most likely to enjoy your life on a day-to-day basis for the next three years? After all, a happy law student is a better law student! We encourage you to come visit us to see for yourself what life is like around here. We’d love to have you on campus!

User avatar
crumpetsandtea
Posts: 7156
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:57 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby crumpetsandtea » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:38 pm

THANK YOU SO MUCH!! In the process of adding it rn.

User avatar
JamMasterJ
Posts: 6688
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 7:17 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby JamMasterJ » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:44 pm

can't wait to read all this. Going to use in interview and why NU


User avatar
JamMasterJ
Posts: 6688
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 7:17 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby JamMasterJ » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:47 pm


you are awesome, now go study!!!

User avatar
JamMasterJ
Posts: 6688
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 7:17 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby JamMasterJ » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:47 pm


you are awesome, now go study!!!

User avatar
crumpetsandtea
Posts: 7156
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:57 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby crumpetsandtea » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:49 pm

JamMasterJ wrote:

you are awesome, now go study!!!

At work ): (hence why I have so much time to do this LOL). Though funny story, my dad actually told me I should bring my LSAT books to work with me. He's knows the CEO/COO of the company really well and he was like "Yeah we have really good relations, they won't mind, just bring the books and study while you have free time"

Thanks for not even trying to pretend I'm employed out of my own merits, dad T_T

User avatar
soj
Posts: 7735
Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 11:10 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby soj » Thu Aug 11, 2011 4:57 pm

:lol: you totally should

Real Madrid
Posts: 835
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 12:21 am

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby Real Madrid » Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:01 pm

Tagged.

User avatar
dakure
Posts: 451
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2011 1:04 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby dakure » Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:11 pm

crumpetsandtea wrote:
JamMasterJ wrote:

you are awesome, now go study!!!

At work ): (hence why I have so much time to do this LOL). Though funny story, my dad actually told me I should bring my LSAT books to work with me. He's knows the CEO/COO of the company really well and he was like "Yeah we have really good relations, they won't mind, just bring the books and study while you have free time"

Thanks for not even trying to pretend I'm employed out of my own merits, dad T_T

Wait... you get paid to TLS from work?

User avatar
basilseal
Posts: 331
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 6:32 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby basilseal » Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:12 pm

Is anyone else in my boat- took the LSAT last December always planning to apply this cycle? I'm curious about extra work I may need to do to beg for fee waivers, etc.

User avatar
descartesb4thehorse
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 1:03 am

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby descartesb4thehorse » Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:14 pm

The viewbook was really cool. But it wasn't 200k and no savings worth of cool.

I still think I'm going to shoot for an on-campus interview. I'm hoping I get an AdComm since I'm actually traveling to the city for that purpose, but I won't pitch a fit if it's a current student. Maybe it'll be one of the guys in the Challenge Northwestern Students thread, and we can go out for some Scotch afterwards.

User avatar
descartesb4thehorse
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 1:03 am

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby descartesb4thehorse » Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:17 pm

basilseal wrote:Is anyone else in my boat- took the LSAT last December always planning to apply this cycle? I'm curious about extra work I may need to do to beg for fee waivers, etc.


You should check out this thread.

A quote from one of last year's applicants re: fee waivers when an earlier LSAT was taken.

Haribo wrote:Something similar happened to me. It sucks. I got a bunch of fee waivers after I took the LSAT in December, and when I went to apply the following year many schools wouldn't carry the fee waiver over or give me a new one. Schools are especially stingy about requesting merit-based fee waivers early in the cycle - around November-December I started getting emails waiving the application fee from schools I had unsuccessfully tried to solicit fee waivers earlier.

I ended up just not applying to most schools that didn't waive the fee, especially safeties, unless I really wanted to go.

User avatar
crumpetsandtea
Posts: 7156
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:57 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby crumpetsandtea » Thu Aug 11, 2011 6:22 pm

descartesb4thehorse wrote:The viewbook was really cool. But it wasn't 200k and no savings worth of cool.

I still think I'm going to shoot for an on-campus interview. I'm hoping I get an AdComm since I'm actually traveling to the city for that purpose, but I won't pitch a fit if it's a current student. Maybe it'll be one of the guys in the Challenge Northwestern Students thread, and we can go out for some Scotch afterwards.

When are you planning on going? Maybe we'll be in town around the same time. You seem like a cool person (evidence: love for Doctor Who), we could do a TLS meetup!!! I know there's a bunch of TLS-ers at UofChi too.

User avatar
Eichörnchen
Posts: 1119
Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 8:51 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby Eichörnchen » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:08 pm

crumpetsandtea wrote:
descartesb4thehorse wrote:The viewbook was really cool. But it wasn't 200k and no savings worth of cool.

I still think I'm going to shoot for an on-campus interview. I'm hoping I get an AdComm since I'm actually traveling to the city for that purpose, but I won't pitch a fit if it's a current student. Maybe it'll be one of the guys in the Challenge Northwestern Students thread, and we can go out for some Scotch afterwards.

When are you planning on going? Maybe we'll be in town around the same time. You seem like a cool person (evidence: love for Doctor Who), we could do a TLS meetup!!! I know there's a bunch of TLS-ers at UofChi too.

Crumpsy I am thinking I might do my interview right after the LSAT. I have to sort through everything in my life, discard the things I won't take to grad school, pack and put the things I will into storage, pack for a super-extended travel period, finish apps and then leave the states asap :lol: Needless to say I should probably get the interview outta the way as soon as I can.

User avatar
crumpetsandtea
Posts: 7156
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:57 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby crumpetsandtea » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:29 pm

Eichörnchen wrote:Crumpsy I am thinking I might do my interview right after the LSAT. I have to sort through everything in my life, discard the things I won't take to grad school, pack and put the things I will into storage, pack for a super-extended travel period, finish apps and then leave the states asap :lol: Needless to say I should probably get the interview outta the way as soon as I can.

Me too! I want to get my app in ASAP (esp since I'm ED-ing) so I want everything out of the way so I can have everything submitted and in NU's hands as soon as my LSAT scores come out.

User avatar
Eichörnchen
Posts: 1119
Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 8:51 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby Eichörnchen » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:44 pm

crumpetsandtea wrote:
Eichörnchen wrote:Crumpsy I am thinking I might do my interview right after the LSAT. I have to sort through everything in my life, discard the things I won't take to grad school, pack and put the things I will into storage, pack for a super-extended travel period, finish apps and then leave the states asap :lol: Needless to say I should probably get the interview outta the way as soon as I can.

Me too! I want to get my app in ASAP (esp since I'm ED-ing) so I want everything out of the way so I can have everything submitted and in NU's hands as soon as my LSAT scores come out.

Ooh maybe we can meet up in Chicago and eat pizza/cry while drinking about how we haven't gotten scores back/celebrate my birthday/meet TLS peoples

So much important stuff to do! :)

User avatar
tmon
Posts: 1242
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:52 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby tmon » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:51 pm

I'm expecting an invite, Crumps/Eich! Let me know if you need opinions on hotels or whatever. Also, if it's not uber-creepy to do so I can offer a futon/couch to crash on if you're strapped for cash. I'm like 30-45 mins north of the campus :)

Thinking about doing the interview after October 1st too. We'll see...

User avatar
crumpetsandtea
Posts: 7156
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:57 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby crumpetsandtea » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:51 pm

Eichörnchen wrote:Ooh maybe we can meet up in Chicago and eat pizza/cry while drinking about how we haven't gotten scores back/celebrate my birthday/meet TLS peoples

So much important stuff to do! :)

Oh cool, when's your bday? (: (:

User avatar
Eichörnchen
Posts: 1119
Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 8:51 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby Eichörnchen » Thu Aug 11, 2011 8:05 pm

Haha Tmon I already thought of you and already planned on mentioning a couch crash.

My birfday is the 24th aka - the day we will most likely get our scores :shock: Heaven help me.

User avatar
tmon
Posts: 1242
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:52 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby tmon » Thu Aug 11, 2011 8:28 pm

Eichörnchen wrote:Haha Tmon I already thought of you and already planned on mentioning a couch crash.

My birfday is the 24th aka - the day we will most likely get our scores :shock: Heaven help me.

Sweet! Just pick one of the middle weeks of October, or at least not the second/last weekend of the month, cuz I've got UM football to attend to :).

User avatar
crumpetsandtea
Posts: 7156
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:57 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby crumpetsandtea » Thu Aug 11, 2011 8:34 pm

tmon wrote:I'm expecting an invite, Crumps/Eich! Let me know if you need opinions on hotels or whatever. Also, if it's not uber-creepy to do so I can offer a futon/couch to crash on if you're strapped for cash. I'm like 30-45 mins north of the campus :)

Thinking about doing the interview after October 1st too. We'll see...

Awww, thanks tmon!! I already have a place to stay though (coughdany/xifengcough XD). If we're in town at the same time we should def all hang out. Seems like you live there too, so even if Eich and I come on diff weekends ( ): ) we should still hang! ^_^

User avatar
Eichörnchen
Posts: 1119
Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 8:51 pm

Re: Northwestern c/o 2015 Applicants (2011-2012 cycle)

Postby Eichörnchen » Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:45 pm

Haha Crumps you're already going to be staying with TLSers. We should make a big TLS party out of this because we will be in score-waiting agony. Distractions and fun are essential I'm sure.




Return to “Law School Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists”