Military Law

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JagRes19

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Re: Military Law

Postby JagRes19 » Tue Aug 06, 2019 10:02 pm

Army JAG Reserve Selectee here after finally receiving waiver!
Any selectees been told they are definitely in the Jan 2020 JAOBC class? Have you been Commissioned?

keong678

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Re: Military Law

Postby keong678 » Thu Aug 08, 2019 4:55 pm

Anybody have experience with getting DD368? I am AD selectee for Army Jag and currently enlisted in Army reserves. I had mine submitted in January and got pushed to the general level. It's been about 8 months now and I am starting to worry that I won't get released from my reserve unit. Any chances that it might get denied? Any insight will be appreciated...

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Re: Military Law

Postby SuperSpartan88 » Thu Aug 08, 2019 7:30 pm

keong678 wrote:Anybody have experience with getting DD368? I am AD selectee for Army Jag and currently enlisted in Army reserves. I had mine submitted in January and got pushed to the general level. It's been about 8 months now and I am starting to worry that I won't get released from my reserve unit. Any chances that it might get denied? Any insight will be appreciated...


I'm hoping to be in a similar boat when I finally do get my license. I'm an officer in the guard but am wondering wheat they are going to say when I tell them I want to go to an active component of service. Did the leadership from the JAG side offer any help?

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Aug 12, 2019 11:11 am

I have an upcoming interview for AF JAG and my only big concern is physical fitness. I have been overweight for my entire life but I've worked extremely hard over the past few months to get in shape and lose weight, and I'm now at passing levels for the PT test (including the weight requirement, but not by much). My goal is to be able to max the PT test in the long term and I intend on making that a point in the interview.

I am unsure what would be the ideal way to frame this scenario, should I be completely forthcoming that my diet and exercise was a recent thing and that I've made some pretty drastic changes to the way I eat and exercise lately? Or would that give off the impression that my weight loss may not last? If the interviewer looks at my Facebook profile it will be immediately clear that my current weight is a recent state of affairs.

Or, alternatively, I could softball it and avoid that discussion entirely and just say that I'm at passing levels but am still making progress towards getting faster/stronger.

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howell

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Re: Military Law

Postby howell » Mon Aug 12, 2019 1:34 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I have an upcoming interview for AF JAG and my only big concern is physical fitness. I have been overweight for my entire life but I've worked extremely hard over the past few months to get in shape and lose weight, and I'm now at passing levels for the PT test (including the weight requirement, but not by much). My goal is to be able to max the PT test in the long term and I intend on making that a point in the interview.

I am unsure what would be the ideal way to frame this scenario, should I be completely forthcoming that my diet and exercise was a recent thing and that I've made some pretty drastic changes to the way I eat and exercise lately? Or would that give off the impression that my weight loss may not last? If the interviewer looks at my Facebook profile it will be immediately clear that my current weight is a recent state of affairs.

Or, alternatively, I could softball it and avoid that discussion entirely and just say that I'm at passing levels but am still making progress towards getting faster/stronger.

If you're within standards, I wouldn't spin it as "I totally changed my life." I'd probably go with something along the lines of, "When I decided this is what I wanted to do, I checked the PT and weight standards and then made sure I got within standards on both. I looked up the PT requirements for my age/gender and how to perform a PT test according to the AFI. I have taken X practice tests so far, with my latest score being a ___." This is a better answer than 80% of candidates, from my experience. PT/weight (for the Air Force) is a way to get dinged; it usually won't be the thing that gets you the nod.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Aug 12, 2019 2:12 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I have an upcoming interview for AF JAG and my only big concern is physical fitness. I have been overweight for my entire life but I've worked extremely hard over the past few months to get in shape and lose weight, and I'm now at passing levels for the PT test (including the weight requirement, but not by much). My goal is to be able to max the PT test in the long term and I intend on making that a point in the interview.

I am unsure what would be the ideal way to frame this scenario, should I be completely forthcoming that my diet and exercise was a recent thing and that I've made some pretty drastic changes to the way I eat and exercise lately? Or would that give off the impression that my weight loss may not last? If the interviewer looks at my Facebook profile it will be immediately clear that my current weight is a recent state of affairs.

Or, alternatively, I could softball it and avoid that discussion entirely and just say that I'm at passing levels but am still making progress towards getting faster/stronger.


I don't know what your interview will be like, but in mine I wasn't asked about this at all. The closest question was one regarding my current fitness routine and, if I were in your situation, I would just state that I work out regularly.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Aug 12, 2019 10:44 pm

Hoping some current or former (ideally, Army) JAGs can weigh in on this:

I have been looking through past posts about JAG exit options, and it seems like most JAGs either (1) stay government (DOJ, AUSA, etc.); (2) open a general practice firm, focusing on criminal defense; or (3) work in-house in some capacity at a government/military contracting firm.

While I am aware that the above are possibilities for JAGs leaving at the four to eight year mark, if I am interested in the DOJ or AUSA in a large city like DC, LA, or NY rather than any flyover states, what are my odds of successfully getting a position with those two agencies? For example, would it be fair to say, after four years of JAG service, if I wanted to work in DC as an AUSA, I would be a lock for the job? Or is it a more accurate representation to say that federal hiring can still be a crapshoot despite JAG service?

A big concern for Army JAG is that a few current/former JAGs have said that the position might not give substantial trial experience as expected, because trial counsel is a slot that a lot of people fight for and even then, most of the issues Army JAGs deal with is transactional, e.g., wills, ROE, determining whether a commander can accept a gift, etc.

Also, some portion of posters have also mentioned that JAGs transitioning into the civilian sector were limited in their options and had some difficulties with the transition. To what extent is this an issue?

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:15 am

Anonymous User wrote:Hi, I am an Air Force JAG select and I am taking the California bar. Is it accurate to think that because the California bar results come out so late that I am more likely to be sent to April training instead of January training?


Late reply but I hope it is useful----

I took the bar in July 2018, got results on a Monday in late October 2018, called the Accessions office the day I got results (be patient with them), resubmitted location preference, got placed with a base that next Thursday, heard nothing for like a month and a half, then went to OTS in January 19.

Bottom line: I know California gets results even later than Texas, but I wouldn't worry about it affecting your OTS attendance. If JAG wants you, they'll try to get you working ASAP.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:41 am

Anonymous User wrote:Hoping some current or former (ideally, Army) JAGs can weigh in on this:

I have been looking through past posts about JAG exit options, and it seems like most JAGs either (1) stay government (DOJ, AUSA, etc.); (2) open a general practice firm, focusing on criminal defense; or (3) work in-house in some capacity at a government/military contracting firm.

While I am aware that the above are possibilities for JAGs leaving at the four to eight year mark, if I am interested in the DOJ or AUSA in a large city like DC, LA, or NY rather than any flyover states, what are my odds of successfully getting a position with those two agencies? For example, would it be fair to say, after four years of JAG service, if I wanted to work in DC as an AUSA, I would be a lock for the job? Or is it a more accurate representation to say that federal hiring can still be a crapshoot despite JAG service?

A big concern for Army JAG is that a few current/former JAGs have said that the position might not give substantial trial experience as expected, because trial counsel is a slot that a lot of people fight for and even then, most of the issues Army JAGs deal with is transactional, e.g., wills, ROE, determining whether a commander can accept a gift, etc.

Also, some portion of posters have also mentioned that JAGs transitioning into the civilian sector were limited in their options and had some difficulties with the transition. To what extent is this an issue?



I think considering the JAG Corps of any branch as a stepping stone to another job before being selected is generally a bad idea.

Not saying it can't be a stepping stone or that thousands of other JAGs haven't viewed it that way. I am saying that you'll may be unhappy as JAG if you view it that way. There likely will be opportunities to help litigate important cases in your first four years, but yes, most court-martials are led by O-4s or senior O-3s. The fundamental values of *service before self* (AF)/ *selfless service* (ARMY) are what get you through the partially (though not entirely) dry years early on.

And no, you're for sure not a lock to get any federal job, particularly as an AUSA in DC, because you were a JAG for four or even eight years. It helps, but so would a lot of jobs.

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Patrick Bateman

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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Tue Aug 13, 2019 10:24 am

howell wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I have an upcoming interview for AF JAG and my only big concern is physical fitness. I have been overweight for my entire life but I've worked extremely hard over the past few months to get in shape and lose weight, and I'm now at passing levels for the PT test (including the weight requirement, but not by much). My goal is to be able to max the PT test in the long term and I intend on making that a point in the interview.

I am unsure what would be the ideal way to frame this scenario, should I be completely forthcoming that my diet and exercise was a recent thing and that I've made some pretty drastic changes to the way I eat and exercise lately? Or would that give off the impression that my weight loss may not last? If the interviewer looks at my Facebook profile it will be immediately clear that my current weight is a recent state of affairs.

Or, alternatively, I could softball it and avoid that discussion entirely and just say that I'm at passing levels but am still making progress towards getting faster/stronger.

If you're within standards, I wouldn't spin it as "I totally changed my life." I'd probably go with something along the lines of, "When I decided this is what I wanted to do, I checked the PT and weight standards and then made sure I got within standards on both. I looked up the PT requirements for my age/gender and how to perform a PT test according to the AFI. I have taken X practice tests so far, with my latest score being a ___." This is a better answer than 80% of candidates, from my experience. PT/weight (for the Air Force) is a way to get dinged; it usually won't be the thing that gets you the nod.


Howell, as usual, is spot on.

Also - scrub your Facebook. For anyone joining the job market, that thing should be pristine. I've seen folks just delete their existing account and create a new, cleaner one. Other folks tweak the last name and email address so being found is not as obvious.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Tue Aug 13, 2019 10:42 am

Anonymous User wrote:Hoping some current or former (ideally, Army) JAGs can weigh in on this:

I have been looking through past posts about JAG exit options, and it seems like most JAGs either (1) stay government (DOJ, AUSA, etc.); (2) open a general practice firm, focusing on criminal defense; or (3) work in-house in some capacity at a government/military contracting firm.

While I am aware that the above are possibilities for JAGs leaving at the four to eight year mark, if I am interested in the DOJ or AUSA in a large city like DC, LA, or NY rather than any flyover states, what are my odds of successfully getting a position with those two agencies? For example, would it be fair to say, after four years of JAG service, if I wanted to work in DC as an AUSA, I would be a lock for the job? Or is it a more accurate representation to say that federal hiring can still be a crapshoot despite JAG service?

A big concern for Army JAG is that a few current/former JAGs have said that the position might not give substantial trial experience as expected, because trial counsel is a slot that a lot of people fight for and even then, most of the issues Army JAGs deal with is transactional, e.g., wills, ROE, determining whether a commander can accept a gift, etc.

Also, some portion of posters have also mentioned that JAGs transitioning into the civilian sector were limited in their options and had some difficulties with the transition. To what extent is this an issue?


I've posted on this in the past: viewtopic.php?f=23&t=31543&start=5825#p8143154

The topic has come up a few times since then, so dig through the thread.

Just as a threshold matter, I would not consider anyone a lock for Main Justice or a USAO, no matter what their experience. Some folks will be more competitive than others, but Federal hiring can be unpredictable - you have to be good at interviewing, the people you are interviewing with have to like you, and they have to be buying the sort of experience that you are selling. These are hard jobs to get and the competition to get them is fierce.

I do not know exactly how Army assignments work but let me answer from my AF perspective - it would be highly unusual to be able to land an AUSA gig after only the first four year tour. You just don't have enough relevant experience. At the very best, you did one tour at base legal and then two years as an ADC. Given the quality of folks applying to DOJ and USAOs, that is probably not going to get you there. You need at least the follow-on tour in the justice world as an STC/SDC/Appellate Counsel.

Underlying my above comments is the issue you are smart to be tracking - all of that presupposes you are in fact getting that experience through military justice assignments. If you get stove piped into some legal assistance job where that is what you are doing full time, you are going to have to reassess your timeline until you can gain the required courtroom experience. This is less of an issue in the Air Force where we are trying cases as TCs irrespective of our day job.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:58 am

Patrick Bateman wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Hoping some current or former (ideally, Army) JAGs can weigh in on this:

I have been looking through past posts about JAG exit options, and it seems like most JAGs either (1) stay government (DOJ, AUSA, etc.); (2) open a general practice firm, focusing on criminal defense; or (3) work in-house in some capacity at a government/military contracting firm.

While I am aware that the above are possibilities for JAGs leaving at the four to eight year mark, if I am interested in the DOJ or AUSA in a large city like DC, LA, or NY rather than any flyover states, what are my odds of successfully getting a position with those two agencies? For example, would it be fair to say, after four years of JAG service, if I wanted to work in DC as an AUSA, I would be a lock for the job? Or is it a more accurate representation to say that federal hiring can still be a crapshoot despite JAG service?

A big concern for Army JAG is that a few current/former JAGs have said that the position might not give substantial trial experience as expected, because trial counsel is a slot that a lot of people fight for and even then, most of the issues Army JAGs deal with is transactional, e.g., wills, ROE, determining whether a commander can accept a gift, etc.

Also, some portion of posters have also mentioned that JAGs transitioning into the civilian sector were limited in their options and had some difficulties with the transition. To what extent is this an issue?


I've posted on this in the past: viewtopic.php?f=23&t=31543&start=5825#p8143154

The topic has come up a few times since then, so dig through the thread.

Just as a threshold matter, I would not consider anyone a lock for Main Justice or a USAO, no matter what their experience. Some folks will be more competitive than others, but Federal hiring can be unpredictable - you have to be good at interviewing, the people you are interviewing with have to like you, and they have to be buying the sort of experience that you are selling. These are hard jobs to get and the competition to get them is fierce.

I do not know exactly how Army assignments work but let me answer from my AF perspective - it would be highly unusual to be able to land an AUSA gig after only the first four year tour. You just don't have enough relevant experience. At the very best, you did one tour at base legal and then two years as an ADC. Given the quality of folks applying to DOJ and USAOs, that is probably not going to get you there. You need at least the follow-on tour in the justice world as an STC/SDC/Appellate Counsel.

Underlying my above comments is the issue you are smart to be tracking - all of that presupposes you are in fact getting that experience through military justice assignments. If you get stove piped into some legal assistance job where that is what you are doing full time, you are going to have to reassess your timeline until you can gain the required courtroom experience. This is less of an issue in the Air Force where we are trying cases as TCs irrespective of our day job.


If you haven't started JAG yet, I think the best case scenario is for you to get firm experience first if you really want to work in DOJ or AUSA in a major city. The combination of actual trial experience in JAG (if you're fortunate) plus firm experience and maybe a clerkship would make you competitive. I think that getting these positions is always part luck though, so as much planning as you think you can do, you're only maximizing your chances. By no means can you ever be a lock.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:24 pm

I'm not sure that legal assistance JAG work is very helpful for transitioning to a criminal USAO position. I have a couple years of National Guard JAG experience (all reserve though), in addition to six years of criminal trials (mainly on the prosecution side in a major city). I don't have any clerkships, unfortunately.

With my resume, I'm able to get interviews in flyover markets (think mid-sized midwestern markets), but haven't landed any job offers in about 2 years of aggressive applications. I have applied to roughly 100 AUSA/DOJ openings and have been offered eight interviews.

It's hard to determine which candidates are getting hired. I'm sure it's very office dependent. Generally in the smaller rural USAOs, it seems to be people with local connections and/or district court clerkships. Not necessarily people with local ADA experience, it's more common to see someone with prior SAUSA experience getting hired. I see the occasional one or two term former JAG, but it may not be that much of a boost on average.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:49 pm

SuperSpartan88 wrote:
keong678 wrote:Anybody have experience with getting DD368? I am AD selectee for Army Jag and currently enlisted in Army reserves. I had mine submitted in January and got pushed to the general level. It's been about 8 months now and I am starting to worry that I won't get released from my reserve unit. Any chances that it might get denied? Any insight will be appreciated...


I'm hoping to be in a similar boat when I finally do get my license. I'm an officer in the guard but am wondering wheat they are going to say when I tell them I want to go to an active component of service. Did the leadership from the JAG side offer any help?



JAG active recruiter (O-3) sent a memorandum to my unit asking to expedite the process and it got attached and sent to EPAS(?). Our XO tried getting released to IRR to do some UN related job for a year and come back but was told she would need to pay back all her scholarships etc. (she was ROTC) I would speak with your commander about going active and give them a heads up. Since you are already an officer I think the process might be a little faster. You would also have direct access to phone numbers at the higher up. As an E-4? not so much haha. My unit was very supportive though. Always know you gotta be in good terms with your S1. Good luck!

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 14, 2019 5:45 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Patrick Bateman wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Hoping some current or former (ideally, Army) JAGs can weigh in on this:

I have been looking through past posts about JAG exit options, and it seems like most JAGs either (1) stay government (DOJ, AUSA, etc.); (2) open a general practice firm, focusing on criminal defense; or (3) work in-house in some capacity at a government/military contracting firm.

While I am aware that the above are possibilities for JAGs leaving at the four to eight year mark, if I am interested in the DOJ or AUSA in a large city like DC, LA, or NY rather than any flyover states, what are my odds of successfully getting a position with those two agencies? For example, would it be fair to say, after four years of JAG service, if I wanted to work in DC as an AUSA, I would be a lock for the job? Or is it a more accurate representation to say that federal hiring can still be a crapshoot despite JAG service?

A big concern for Army JAG is that a few current/former JAGs have said that the position might not give substantial trial experience as expected, because trial counsel is a slot that a lot of people fight for and even then, most of the issues Army JAGs deal with is transactional, e.g., wills, ROE, determining whether a commander can accept a gift, etc.

Also, some portion of posters have also mentioned that JAGs transitioning into the civilian sector were limited in their options and had some difficulties with the transition. To what extent is this an issue?


I've posted on this in the past: http://top-law-schools.com/forums/viewt ... 5#p8143154

The topic has come up a few times since then, so dig through the thread.

Just as a threshold matter, I would not consider anyone a lock for Main Justice or a USAO, no matter what their experience. Some folks will be more competitive than others, but Federal hiring can be unpredictable - you have to be good at interviewing, the people you are interviewing with have to like you, and they have to be buying the sort of experience that you are selling. These are hard jobs to get and the competition to get them is fierce.

I do not know exactly how Army assignments work but let me answer from my AF perspective - it would be highly unusual to be able to land an AUSA gig after only the first four year tour. You just don't have enough relevant experience. At the very best, you did one tour at base legal and then two years as an ADC. Given the quality of folks applying to DOJ and USAOs, that is probably not going to get you there. You need at least the follow-on tour in the justice world as an STC/SDC/Appellate Counsel.

Underlying my above comments is the issue you are smart to be tracking - all of that presupposes you are in fact getting that experience through military justice assignments. If you get stove piped into some legal assistance job where that is what you are doing full time, you are going to have to reassess your timeline until you can gain the required courtroom experience. This is less of an issue in the Air Force where we are trying cases as TCs irrespective of our day job.


If you haven't started JAG yet, I think the best case scenario is for you to get firm experience first if you really want to work in DOJ or AUSA in a major city. The combination of actual trial experience in JAG (if you're fortunate) plus firm experience and maybe a clerkship would make you competitive. I think that getting these positions is always part luck though, so as much planning as you think you can do, you're only maximizing your chances. By no means can you ever be a lock.


Thank you and everyone else who has commented so far.

I'm guessing the firm experience you're referring to should be litigation-related for DOJ or AUSA positions, rather than regulatory/transactional, correct?

Also - and I recognize this is very anecdotal - but is it common for JAGs to experience difficulties in transitioning out into a decent position after first tour or at the six-year mark?

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Re: Military Law

Postby howell » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:52 am

Anonymous User wrote:Also - and I recognize this is very anecdotal - but is it common for JAGs to experience difficulties in transitioning out into a decent position after first tour or at the six-year mark?

It depends on the experience you get, the market when you're getting out, and where you're willing to relocate to.

Right now? It's a fantastic time to be getting out. 2008-2012? I know several JAGs who waited that out.

My friends with appellate experience in the AF who are leaving have gotten great jobs with the DoJ or other agencies (GS-15, sometimes with increased steps). One guy is at Boies Schiller in NYC now. These people all mostly got out around the 6-year mark. I am leaving at the 6.5-year mark and got offers from multiple federal agencies in multiple cities, one of the huge labor & employment firms, and I am confident I would have received an offer from at least one USAO (not DC, CA, or NY) as well as a defense contractor had the timing not disqualified me. And I'm certainly nothing special.

Your experience will guide where you can go. If you spend 4 years stuck in base legal, your best bet might be going the general/regional counsel route with any federal agency. You could still try for any crim position anywhere, but you would be better off if you had a stint as an ADC or a senior trial or appellate position.

If your target market is Toledo, OH, options might be more limited than in DC.

In the AF, staying until 6 years is probably more common than punching at 4, based on logistics and the experience you'll get in a second or third assignment. But leaving anywhere between the 4 and 10 year mark can be a great option.

I would be more scared of this in the Army than the Air Force, since they silo you each of your first 4 years, and you might not even get into the courtroom in that time. I hope some Army JAGs can give a better picture of what post-active duty employment options look like.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 14, 2019 1:19 pm

The Marine and Army JAGs I know have not been too successful in finding AUSA positions immediately after leaving active duty. Some have gone to federal agencies in a more advisory, non-litigation role, but most seem to become ADAs.

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Re: Military Law

Postby thriller1122 » Thu Aug 15, 2019 12:01 pm

Applied to the board in September for Air Force. Can anyone previously selected (preferably from recent boards) shed light on when I would find out if selected? The AF website says 30-60 days, which seems reasonable considering other AF programs, but it seems like people in this thread have found out sooner. Any information would be greatly appreciated!

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Re: Military Law

Postby howell » Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:35 am

thriller1122 wrote:Applied to the board in September for Air Force. Can anyone previously selected (preferably from recent boards) shed light on when I would find out if selected? The AF website says 30-60 days, which seems reasonable considering other AF programs, but it seems like people in this thread have found out sooner. Any information would be greatly appreciated!

I have been involved in the selection process over the last ~2 years. Most of the time the actual selection board is held during the second-ish week of the month in question, and the results are generally out within perhaps a couple of week. So it would be normal to find out before the end of September, but that could always change.

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Re: Military Law

Postby notarevert » Fri Aug 16, 2019 6:18 pm

Hello Everyone,

Spent the last month combing through all of these posts and the information you have all provided made my application as competitive as possible. Thank you very much.

I completed my DAP interview this morning at [MOD NOTE- REDACTED PER POSTER REQUEST]. It was a phenomenal experience and will post when I hear anything. Can also offer some advice at this juncture for those who want some info on the application and interview process; however, previous posts cover most of what I would offer.

Best of luck to those applying for the September Board and thanks again to all of you for the information.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Aug 16, 2019 7:34 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I am a recent law school graduate/army reserve select, scheduled to attend training in early 2020. I am also set to start a job at a law firm this fall. This means I will only be at the firm for a few months before I have to leave for training. I have not yet told the firm about my situation. Does anyone have any experience/advice for how to broach this subject with the firm? (I can't really afford not to work before training starts.) I appreciate any insight.


Question: When were you notified what jaobc class you are assigned to in 2020?
Also a Reserve selectee!

I got an email yesterday laying out the accessions process and telling me that, for planning purposes, I would be going to the January JAOBC class.

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Re: Military Law

Postby jacketyellow » Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:32 am

notarevert wrote:Hello Everyone,

Spent the last month combing through all of these posts and the information you have all provided made my application as competitive as possible. Thank you very much.

I completed my DAP interview this morning. It was a phenomenal experience and will post when I hear anything. Can also offer some advice at this juncture for those who want some info on the application and interview process; however, previous posts cover most of what I would offer.

Best of luck to those applying for the September Board and thanks again to all of you for the information.


Hi! Check your private messages because I have some questions. Thanks!
Last edited by AdminMegan on Wed Aug 21, 2019 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Member request

swharre

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Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:50 am

Re: Military Law

Postby swharre » Sun Aug 18, 2019 9:09 am

Hello,

I just finished my USAFJAG application with my SJA interview last week. The SJA told me that he would be recommending me for selection to the JAX. However, I am prior enlisted and had an article 15. The SJA told me that I would have to have a waiver approved by JAX to be selected.

My SJA was very insightful but could not tell me very much about the waiver or whether I had a chance. However, he did say he had no doubt I would make a great JAG and that he had no problem recommending me for the waiver after our conversation.

Does anyone know anything about this process?
Any thoughts out there?

Please and thank you.

swharre

New
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:50 am

Re: Military Law

Postby swharre » Mon Aug 19, 2019 8:20 am

Hello,

I just interviewed with the SJA at a local AFB and he told me that he would be recommending me for selection, and that I would make a great fit with the USAFJAG. However, I am prior enlisted and had an article 15, the SJA said that HQJAG would have to approve a waiver. The SJA explained that this would be my biggest hurdle but he wasn't sure how great of a hurdle that obtaining the waiver would be. Does anyone have any experience with this issue or have any insights on this process? Thanks in advance.

bvsimon3

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Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Jul 31, 2019 5:12 pm

Re: Military Law

Postby bvsimon3 » Mon Aug 19, 2019 1:40 pm

notarevert wrote:Hello Everyone,

Spent the last month combing through all of these posts and the information you have all provided made my application as competitive as possible. Thank you very much.

I completed my DAP interview this morning. It was a phenomenal experience and will post when I hear anything. Can also offer some advice at this juncture for those who want some info on the application and interview process; however, previous posts cover most of what I would offer.

Best of luck to those applying for the September Board and thanks again to all of you for the information.


Please Please share your experience. I have an interview this Friday and am pretty anxious about it. What did they ask you and how long was the interview? Did you need to bring anything like a resume, writing sample, etc? How many people did you meet with? thanks!
Last edited by AdminMegan on Wed Aug 21, 2019 11:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Member request

Seriously? What are you waiting for?

Now there's a charge.
Just kidding ... it's still FREE!




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