Voyager's RC Strategy

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hous
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby hous » Wed Aug 27, 2008 3:48 pm

I just wrote out a very detailed opinion on Voyagers RC strategy, but I hit back and cant get it back.

Since im not going to type it all back out ill just summarize.

I tried his strat, I was missing -4 in 48 minutes on RC, no good. So I tried to speed read passage in 3 minutes and answer questions, I was finishing on time but missing -8 per passage, also no good.

So I did what most prep companies say not to so, I read for content, without writing in margin and maybe only underlining 3 or 4 words, related to authors opinion, dates, names... This worked for me and got me to -4 in the time limit, a big increase.

It turns out underling and writing in the margin was too much of a distraction for me, I would lose focus too easily and it would cause me to go way over the time limit. I have to treat it as one passage and just read straight through it taking minimal breaks during reading.

Im still not content with where im at but Im seeing obviously trends in what questions im missing, this is great news.

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Lyov Myshkin
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Lyov Myshkin » Wed Aug 27, 2008 5:45 pm

hous wrote:I just wrote out a very detailed opinion on Voyagers RC strategy, but I hit back and cant get it back.

Since im not going to type it all back out ill just summarize.

I tried his strat, I was missing -4 in 48 minutes on RC, no good. So I tried to speed read passage in 3 minutes and answer questions, I was finishing on time but missing -8 per passage, also no good.

So I did what most prep companies say not to so, I read for content, without writing in margin and maybe only underlining 3 or 4 words, related to authors opinion, dates, names... This worked for me and got me to -4 in the time limit, a big increase.

It turns out underling and writing in the margin was too much of a distraction for me, I would lose focus too easily and it would cause me to go way over the time limit. I have to treat it as one passage and just read straight through it taking minimal breaks during reading.

Im still not content with where im at but Im seeing obviously trends in what questions im missing, this is great news.


try the highlighter technique, it's way way easier to spot shit, and you can write through (THROUGH) portions of the text, like a big EX (in a three or four line example) and color shifting with topic shifts. it's pretty awesome.

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Rocketman11
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Rocketman11 » Wed Sep 03, 2008 8:20 pm

RC is boning me, out of all sections.

Shummy
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Shummy » Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:41 am

ColtonDLong wrote:
hkfortytwo wrote:since adopting Stanley Otto Swift's suggestion in this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=36512

i've started using highlighters to go through each section the second time in modified version of Castlerock's suggestion in this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=39235

and i got ta thinking, i mean i know that mechanical pencils aren't allowed and all, but what if i could maybe get away with colored pencils through some sort of loophole or something (like if they don't specify the 'type' of pencil you can bring in) so that i could use them on reading comp in a color coded frenzy. and then i discovered this...

--LinkRemoved--

if you don't wanna read it, as it turns out it seems that highlighters are allowed. which in turn means that it may be helpful to practice reading comp with some sort of color coded technique. i haven't really devised a method (hopefully someone else will do that, since i'm pretty lazy), but being able to use highlighters seems to be a benefit thats been overlooked so far in reading comprehension strategy. thoughts on how to reap these benefits would be greatly appreciated.


My thoughts are this: Using a bunch of highlighters during a test would be or at least seems incredibly time consuming. I think underlining with different types of lines would be just as helpful, and quicker. For instance, if he sites evidence...underline all evidence cited with a squiggly line so it can quickly be referred back to. If it is a key word, box it, if he gives his opinion, underline it with a straight line, etc.

I just read straight through and box/underline minimally, but this technique could work!




I just read this as well: --LinkRemoved--

And it says Highlighter. Just one.....I wouldn't practice with a bunch of colors in case you can't use more than one on test day. But maybe you can.....it just doesn't seem like you can.

On a side note....does anyone know why you can't use mechanical pencils?

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:07 pm

Shummy wrote:
ColtonDLong wrote:
hkfortytwo wrote:since adopting Stanley Otto Swift's suggestion in this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=36512

i've started using highlighters to go through each section the second time in modified version of Castlerock's suggestion in this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=39235

and i got ta thinking, i mean i know that mechanical pencils aren't allowed and all, but what if i could maybe get away with colored pencils through some sort of loophole or something (like if they don't specify the 'type' of pencil you can bring in) so that i could use them on reading comp in a color coded frenzy. and then i discovered this...

--LinkRemoved--

if you don't wanna read it, as it turns out it seems that highlighters are allowed. which in turn means that it may be helpful to practice reading comp with some sort of color coded technique. i haven't really devised a method (hopefully someone else will do that, since i'm pretty lazy), but being able to use highlighters seems to be a benefit thats been overlooked so far in reading comprehension strategy. thoughts on how to reap these benefits would be greatly appreciated.


My thoughts are this: Using a bunch of highlighters during a test would be or at least seems incredibly time consuming. I think underlining with different types of lines would be just as helpful, and quicker. For instance, if he sites evidence...underline all evidence cited with a squiggly line so it can quickly be referred back to. If it is a key word, box it, if he gives his opinion, underline it with a straight line, etc.

I just read straight through and box/underline minimally, but this technique could work!




I just read this as well: --LinkRemoved--

And it says Highlighter. Just one.....I wouldn't practice with a bunch of colors in case you can't use more than one on test day. But maybe you can.....it just doesn't seem like you can.

On a side note....does anyone know why you can't use mechanical pencils?


Click, click, click, click, click. No noise. You can't talk. Your digital watch can't beep. And you can't click your mechanical pencil either.

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:08 pm

hkfortytwo wrote:i think i'm gonna study for the mcat after the lsat, actually. i'm gonna put a good year into it.


I teach MCAT and LSAT. The MCAT is a worthy test, and you will be a smarter individual if you honestly prep for it.

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:09 pm

hkfortytwo wrote:i wanna, but i can be pretty lazy sometimes. i'll have the time since i'm spending a year in asia after the lsat to teach english. i figure if i don't have some sort of a deadline, i'll end up wasting a year of my life, likely drinking it away from what i hear about asia. if i can test decently on the mcat, i should end up with a good broad knowledge of stuff (physics, bio, chem, o-chem). it's alot to learn in a year though since my existing knowledge is pretty rusty. it's too bad you can't make a living taking standardized tests. i'd hop on that boat.


Try hitting up one of the test prep companies for a job. I make a nice living taking standardized tests. I earn up to $35/hour.

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:13 pm

I find it amusing that the people who are knocking OP's strategy have not mastered the RC section. I am consistently testing RC at -1 or -2 per section. I hope to get that down to -0 before December. Writing down the main ideas is essential to my accuracy. If you cannot paraphrase each main point in the margin (quickly and concisely), then your reading comprehension is poor. Identifying and articulating main points are skills that must be practiced. If those strategies aren't helping you, it's not because the strategies are bad, it's because you don't read well enough to truly master RC.

Cholmondley-Warner
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Cholmondley-Warner » Mon Sep 22, 2008 1:00 pm

JazzOne wrote:I find it amusing that the people who are knocking OP's strategy have not mastered the RC section. I am consistently testing RC at -1 or -2 per section. I hope to get that down to -0 before December. Writing down the main ideas is essential to my accuracy. If you cannot paraphrase each main point in the margin (quickly and concisely), then your reading comprehension is poor. Identifying and articulating main points are skills that must be practiced. If those strategies aren't helping you, it's not because the strategies are bad, it's because you don't read well enough to truly master RC.


That's a pretty stupid assumption.
By the same token, I can assume that your memory simply sucks.

What exactly is wrong with just reading and answering the questions?
You need a visual aid? What's wrong with the one right in front of you?
Stupid, I say.

And sure there are ways to make the passage more manageable, but from what I found, writing the main ideas is not one of them. If you can’t glean that information from a single read and retain them, then I’ll be a douche and assume that you don’t know how to read.

Best strategy my ass. If you need help on RC, then just admit that you suck at reading and read more often PLEASE.

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Mon Sep 22, 2008 1:53 pm

Cholmondley-Warner wrote:
JazzOne wrote:I find it amusing that the people who are knocking OP's strategy have not mastered the RC section. I am consistently testing RC at -1 or -2 per section. I hope to get that down to -0 before December. Writing down the main ideas is essential to my accuracy. If you cannot paraphrase each main point in the margin (quickly and concisely), then your reading comprehension is poor. Identifying and articulating main points are skills that must be practiced. If those strategies aren't helping you, it's not because the strategies are bad, it's because you don't read well enough to truly master RC.


That's a pretty stupid assumption.
By the same token, I can assume that your memory simply sucks.

What exactly is wrong with just reading and answering the questions?
You need a visual aid? What's wrong with the one right in front of you?
Stupid, I say.

And sure there are ways to make the passage more manageable, but from what I found, writing the main ideas is not one of them. If you can’t glean that information from a single read and retain them, then I’ll be a douche and assume that you don’t know how to read.

Best strategy my ass. If you need help on RC, then just admit that you suck at reading and read more often PLEASE.


Please post a copy of your scanned score report. You're a total tool, and I highly doubt you score above 170. By the way, a visual aid may not be necessary, but the visual cortex of your brain has been shown by many studies to aid in solving complex problems. I'm not surprised that you didn't know that.

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Helmholtz
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Helmholtz » Mon Sep 22, 2008 2:36 pm

JazzOne wrote:
Cholmondley-Warner wrote:
JazzOne wrote:I find it amusing that the people who are knocking OP's strategy have not mastered the RC section. I am consistently testing RC at -1 or -2 per section. I hope to get that down to -0 before December. Writing down the main ideas is essential to my accuracy. If you cannot paraphrase each main point in the margin (quickly and concisely), then your reading comprehension is poor. Identifying and articulating main points are skills that must be practiced. If those strategies aren't helping you, it's not because the strategies are bad, it's because you don't read well enough to truly master RC.


That's a pretty stupid assumption.
By the same token, I can assume that your memory simply sucks.

What exactly is wrong with just reading and answering the questions?
You need a visual aid? What's wrong with the one right in front of you?
Stupid, I say.

And sure there are ways to make the passage more manageable, but from what I found, writing the main ideas is not one of them. If you can’t glean that information from a single read and retain them, then I’ll be a douche and assume that you don’t know how to read.

Best strategy my ass. If you need help on RC, then just admit that you suck at reading and read more often PLEASE.


Please post a copy of your scanned score report. You're a total tool, and I highly doubt you score above 170. By the way, a visual aid may not be necessary, but the visual cortex of your brain has been shown by many studies to aid in solving complex problems. I'm not surprised that you didn't know that.


I would read this forum if not only for the vehement defenses and attacks on certain types of test taking or studying. It's been a long time since the visual cortex came up in an argument between my friends.

As for Voyager's study method: I think some good points were raised, which I might implement into my studying. The plan as a whole is a little too detailed and time-consuming, in my opinion. That being said, it is two weeks to the LSAT and it would probably be a really, really bad idea to switch horses in midstream at this point, especially since my old method has been fairing pretty decently for me.

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Mon Sep 22, 2008 3:31 pm

JazzOne wrote:
Cholmondley-Warner wrote:
JazzOne wrote:I find it amusing that the people who are knocking OP's strategy have not mastered the RC section. I am consistently testing RC at -1 or -2 per section. I hope to get that down to -0 before December. Writing down the main ideas is essential to my accuracy. If you cannot paraphrase each main point in the margin (quickly and concisely), then your reading comprehension is poor. Identifying and articulating main points are skills that must be practiced. If those strategies aren't helping you, it's not because the strategies are bad, it's because you don't read well enough to truly master RC.


That's a pretty stupid assumption.
By the same token, I can assume that your memory simply sucks.

What exactly is wrong with just reading and answering the questions?
You need a visual aid? What's wrong with the one right in front of you?
Stupid, I say.

And sure there are ways to make the passage more manageable, but from what I found, writing the main ideas is not one of them. If you can’t glean that information from a single read and retain them, then I’ll be a douche and assume that you don’t know how to read.

Best strategy my ass. If you need help on RC, then just admit that you suck at reading and read more often PLEASE.


Please post a copy of your scanned score report. You're a total tool, and I highly doubt you score above 170. By the way, a visual aid may not be necessary, but the visual cortex of your brain has been shown by many studies to aid in solving complex problems. I'm not surprised that you didn't know that.


I would read this forum if not only for the vehement defenses and attacks on certain types of test taking or studying. It's been a long time since the visual cortex came up in an argument between my friends.


Perhaps the topic of the visual cortex didn't come up, but if you were discussing anything complex, you were probably using your visual cortex to organize and coneptualize the ideas. Even imagination has its roots in the visual cortex. It is a fascinating portion of the brain, and I believe that top test takers use it extensively.

Cholmondley-Warner
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Cholmondley-Warner » Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:05 pm

JazzOne wrote:Please post a copy of your scanned score report. You're a total tool, and I highly doubt you score above 170. By the way, a visual aid may not be necessary, but the visual cortex of your brain has been shown by many studies to aid in solving complex problems. I'm not surprised that you didn't know that.


Wow! What in God's name are you going on about?
What about the visual cortex?
Please continue and elaborate on how writing the main ideas in the margin will somehow incite the primary visual cortex more so than simply the act of reading. That’s a pretty big gap to fill.

You're obviously an idiot.
You don't even realize that you can achieve the same effect by rereading the topic sentences, which by the way would probably be a lot quicker. I mean, all you're doing is regurgitating. You're not magically activating a part of your brain.

BTW, I'm not able to score above 170? Based on what? I haven't even taken the exam yet, and I've never had any issues with RC.

There are plenty of high scorers, right here on campus, and most of them attribute their success on the exam to their reading aptitude. And scribbling some stupid sh!t down in the margin isn't going to make them a better reader.
You are no longer worthy of my attention as you’ve proven yourself to be a complete idiot.

Bottom line -- if you need to improve on RC, then you need to read more.

WestOfTheRest
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby WestOfTheRest » Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:38 pm

Cholmondley-Warner wrote:
JazzOne wrote:Please post a copy of your scanned score report. You're a total tool, and I highly doubt you score above 170. By the way, a visual aid may not be necessary, but the visual cortex of your brain has been shown by many studies to aid in solving complex problems. I'm not surprised that you didn't know that.


Wow! What in God's name are you going on about?
What about the visual cortex?
Please continue and elaborate on how writing the main ideas in the margin will somehow incite the primary visual cortex more so than simply the act of reading. That’s a pretty big gap to fill.

You're obviously an idiot.
You don't even realize that you can achieve the same effect by rereading the topic sentences, which by the way would probably be a lot quicker. I mean, all you're doing is regurgitating. You're not magically activating a part of your brain.

BTW, I'm not able to score above 170? Based on what? I haven't even taken the exam yet, and I've never had any issues with RC.

There are plenty of high scorers, right here on campus, and most of them attribute their success on the exam to their reading aptitude. And scribbling some stupid sh!t down in the margin isn't going to make them a better reader.
You are no longer worthy of my attention as you’ve proven yourself to be a complete idiot.

Bottom line -- if you need to improve on RC, then you need to read more.


The hostility, it hurts my heart!

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Lyov Myshkin
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Lyov Myshkin » Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:48 pm

Cholmondley-Warner wrote:You're obviously an idiot.


i don't like jazzone either. personally, i think he's a humorless ass. :?

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Helmholtz
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Helmholtz » Mon Sep 22, 2008 9:55 pm

hkfortytwo wrote:
Cholmondley-Warner wrote:You're obviously an idiot.


i don't like jazzone either. personally, i think he's a humorless ass. :?


Remember, he's paid to study, not to have a sense of humor.

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Tue Sep 23, 2008 10:20 am

Cholmondley-Warner wrote:
JazzOne wrote:Please post a copy of your scanned score report. You're a total tool, and I highly doubt you score above 170. By the way, a visual aid may not be necessary, but the visual cortex of your brain has been shown by many studies to aid in solving complex problems. I'm not surprised that you didn't know that.


Wow! What in God's name are you going on about?
What about the visual cortex?
Please continue and elaborate on how writing the main ideas in the margin will somehow incite the primary visual cortex more so than simply the act of reading. That’s a pretty big gap to fill.

You're obviously an idiot.
You don't even realize that you can achieve the same effect by rereading the topic sentences, which by the way would probably be a lot quicker. I mean, all you're doing is regurgitating. You're not magically activating a part of your brain.

BTW, I'm not able to score above 170? Based on what? I haven't even taken the exam yet, and I've never had any issues with RC.

There are plenty of high scorers, right here on campus, and most of them attribute their success on the exam to their reading aptitude. And scribbling some stupid sh!t down in the margin isn't going to make them a better reader.
You are no longer worthy of my attention as you’ve proven yourself to be a complete idiot.

Bottom line -- if you need to improve on RC, then you need to read more.


Actually, writing the main ideas down does involve the visual cortex. I didn't say to copy them verbatim, so it's not simply "regurgitating." You have to re-work the ideas in your mind so you can state them more concisely. It is obvious you haven't prepped or mastered this test.

CaptainPuff
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby CaptainPuff » Wed Sep 24, 2008 11:51 pm

RC is by far my worst section, averaging -8, so I didn't have anything to lose using Voyagers RC

I think the most useful thing in voyager's strategy is writing the MP for each paragraph. I wasn't doing this before, and even though I thought I had a really good idea of the paragraph MPs, they were usually vague. When one or two words are changed in an answer, it's a deadly mistake.

So I've been using Voyagers strategy for two days, studying nonstop. While my question accuracy/confidence has gotten much better, my time initially slowed down dramatically, taking 13 minutes per passage. Now it takes me about 10 minutes and my accuracy has stayed really high. I think in the end I'm going to cut some of it off, but will definitely keep paragraph MPs and cutting paragraphs into pieces, and various viewpoints.

Even if not using this method, I think writing out all the info he recommends after you do a passage is a really good idea. It really helps reading comprehension.

MrGradgrind
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby MrGradgrind » Thu Oct 02, 2008 10:06 am

How the hell does anyone have trouble with RC? RC is literally the ONLY skill-set present in the LSAT that has been a part of every individual's academic development since their equivalent of grade school. Unless somebody paid others to do their work for them during university, then EVERYONE had to do RC during their collegiate career.

For all those that (for some reason) have trouble with RC, read the question stems first. Unless you're the real life incarnation of Timmy from South Park, you should be able to remember what the questions are as you read the passage. More often than not, a person only needs a 1/3 of the passage to answer the questions, so knowing what you're being asked helps with notation throughout the passage or what details to remember for those that are hesitant to mark up their passage. Unless you read the questions before hitting the passage, you won't know which parts of the passage will be required to answer questions. If something never comes up and you marked it, then you'll just clutter the passage, making more of a visual mess. I prefer marking up only proper nouns that were established to be important in the first paragraph or new terms as they're introduced. If you see a passage about Charlie Brown for example, then whenever you see Linus mentioned in the passage, something will be explained about Linus in that sentence or in the next sentence.

I agree with Voyager that the RC section should be handled in a similar fashion to the LG section. In both sections, you have 8 minutes and 45 seconds to do each problem set. Spend at least 4 minutes reading marking up the passage (or diagramming the game in that case) and the rest of the time should be used for answering the questions. If you don't have a firm command of the passage, then how the hell can you answer the questions with due confidence? You can't, that's how. 4 minutes does sound like a lot, but like the Games section, there WILL be at least 2 freebie questions. In the RC section, anything about the main idea, the purpose, and the tone of the author/character are handouts.

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Thu Oct 02, 2008 12:10 pm

MrGradgrind wrote:How the hell does anyone have trouble with RC? RC is literally the ONLY skill-set present in the LSAT that has been a part of every individual's academic development since their equivalent of grade school.


The problem is that some people have developed reading habits over the last 15 years that actually hurt them on the LSAT RC section. I am very familiar with this concept because I teach MCAT Verbal Reasoning, and my undergraduate background is in biology. I worked as a cancer researcher for several years, and I can assure you that I read science journal articles with a very different approach from what I use on LSAT RC. Scientists are trained to read things thoroughly; we are taught to understand each point before we move on the next. Details are very important to a scientist. When I read a journal article, I am mostly concerned with the data and the specific results of the experiments. I need to know if they used a 1M solution or 0.1M so that I can understand the experiments and possibly re-create them in my own laboratory. If I applied those exact reading skills to RC, they would hurt me considerably because the details are often unimportant. It's hard to get someone with certain reading habits to change them all of a sudden for a standardized test.

You acknowledge in your post that you read the questions first and then focus on the information that helps you answer those questions. That's not how reading is done in college courses. Professors don't care how you read the material. They don't care if you have a photographic memory and read it once; they don't care if you read it 10 times to really absorb the material. You don't get the test questions before you read the books.

I agree that college graduates should be proficient readers, but I think the LSAT offers challenges different from those posed by college reading.

MrGradgrind
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby MrGradgrind » Thu Oct 02, 2008 1:09 pm

JazzOne wrote:The problem is that some people have developed reading habits over the last 15 years that actually hurt them on the LSAT RC section. I am very familiar with this concept because I teach MCAT Verbal Reasoning, and my undergraduate background is in biology. I worked as a cancer researcher for several years, and I can assure you that I read science journal articles with a very different approach from what I use on LSAT RC. Scientists are trained to read things thoroughly; we are taught to understand each point before we move on the next. Details are very important to a scientist. When I read a journal article, I am mostly concerned with the data and the specific results of the experiments. I need to know if they used a 1M solution or 0.1M so that I can understand the experiments and possibly re-create them in my own laboratory. If I applied those exact reading skills to RC, they would hurt me considerably because the details are often unimportant. It's hard to get someone with certain reading habits to change them all of a sudden for a standardized test.

You acknowledge in your post that you read the questions first and then focus on the information that helps you answer those questions. That's not how reading is done in college courses. Professors don't care how you read the material. They don't care if you have a photographic memory and read it once; they don't care if you read it 10 times to really absorb the material. You don't get the test questions before you read the books.

I agree that college graduates should be proficient readers, but I think the LSAT offers challenges different from those posed by college reading.



Of course one cannot (or should not) read questions first in a college course because college classes and exams are not conducted in the same manner as the LSAT. I've never had a 35 minute final exam. Reading comprehension (the skill, not the section) will not change much, if at all based on what a person reads or for what purpose. The problem is that many people who struggle with RC just don't have good reading comprehension skills. The only surprise with the RC section on the LSAT since the early days was the inclusion of dual passages.

I'm not saying people should ignore RC prep, but many people ignore the most important part of RC prep: reading. I read somewhere that almost 65% of current law students begin attending LS at least 2 years after they earned their UG degrees. I understand that reading comp skills can atrophy within a 2 year period, but it should be obvious that the ability to read for structure is integral to success in the RC section. I could learn to read for structure by merely reading the editorials of the New York Times while I'm on the john.

My point is that there are no tricks or gimmicks to do well on the RC section. Anyone can do well on the RC section by following this simple routine.

1) Learn to read for structure (people should have some idea how to do this as a college grad)
2) Learn how to identify main points and topic shifts
3) Create a system of marking up the passage should you require that extra bit of help
4) Practice the first 3 skills until it becomes second nature

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JazzOne
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Thu Oct 02, 2008 1:52 pm

MrGradgrind wrote:1) Learn to read for structure (people should have some idea how to do this as a college grad)
2) Learn how to identify main points and topic shifts
3) Create a system of marking up the passage should you require that extra bit of help
4) Practice the first 3 skills until it becomes second nature


OK, that's reasonable. The only point in your post that I might quarrel with is suggestion #1 above. Some college majors do not teach students to read for structure. The structure of a science textbook is completely unimportant. Having said that, reading for structure is a skill that is easily learned. The one thing that I most agree with you about is that many college graduates are simply poor readers.

MrGradgrind
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby MrGradgrind » Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:12 pm

JazzOne wrote:The only point in your post that I might quarrel with is suggestion #1 above. Some college majors do not teach students to read for structure.


Fair enough

JazzOne wrote:Having said that, reading for structure is a skill that is easily learned. The one thing that I most agree with you about is that many college graduates are simply poor readers.


It shouldn't take too long for most people to learn how to read properly for structure. The most important thing for people to do is practice with scholarly or informative content, such as the editorials from newspapers or articles from scholarly magazines and journals. Not to sound like a prick or anything, but people who do poorly at RC and try to overcome that by looking for tricks or doing RC sections ad nauseum have no one to blame but themselves for doing poorly at RC. At least 75% of RC success is based on becoming a better reader.

This is a site I like to use for my reading comprehension development.

http://www.theonion.com/content/index

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JazzOne
Posts: 2938
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2008 11:04 am

Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JazzOne » Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:28 pm

MrGradgrind wrote:
JazzOne wrote:The only point in your post that I might quarrel with is suggestion #1 above. Some college majors do not teach students to read for structure.


Fair enough

JazzOne wrote:Having said that, reading for structure is a skill that is easily learned. The one thing that I most agree with you about is that many college graduates are simply poor readers.


It shouldn't take too long for most people to learn how to read properly for structure. The most important thing for people to do is practice with scholarly or informative content, such as the editorials from newspapers or articles from scholarly magazines and journals. Not to sound like a prick or anything, but people who do poorly at RC and try to overcome that by looking for tricks or doing RC sections ad nauseum have no one to blame but themselves for doing poorly at RC. At least 75% of RC success is based on becoming a better reader.

This is a site I like to use for my reading comprehension development.

http://www.theonion.com/content/index


Here is a current headline from The Onion: "Broncos Offensive Line Hoping Uniforms Make Them Look Fat."

LOL

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cornell
Posts: 119
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:21 am

Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby cornell » Mon Oct 13, 2008 5:40 pm

I wanna revive this thread. This is probably the best RC strategy out there. Really works.




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