Voyager's RC Strategy

cambie03
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Postby cambie03 » Wed May 30, 2007 10:50 am

help!! it's less than 2 weeks to lsat and i'm starting to freak out.... RC is definitely what's bringing down my score (I basically can't get below 5 wrong on any section, and I never ever finish it on time). I've been trying out this reading comp strategy and it's been helping me understand, but I'm still having trouble with time (usually 10-12 min per spassage). Am I reading into the passage too carefully or maybe writing too many notes in the margin? Can I really improve with so little time before the test? I'm just worried that if I can't master these one-passage questions, I'll be totally screwed for the 2 passage ones.... I'd appreciate any help, thanks!

cambie03
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Postby cambie03 » Thu May 31, 2007 7:37 pm

scratch that last comment.... 3 days of doing voyager's rc hints and i'm already going much faster and getting less wrong. still doing like 4 1/2 min for just reading the passage though but i guess thats ok! thanks dude

xhaust50
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Postby xhaust50 » Mon Jun 04, 2007 11:04 pm

Can anyone that successfully uses this method scan an RC section that they have used so we can see just how much writing we are talking about? This is my worst section, usually 4-5 wrong. I will be hitting RC extremely hard these next few days. I'm registered for the June exam, but if I can't get 170's on the practice exam by friday or saturday I'm going to postpone (and this is a sufficient clause, in which no inference can be made if I do get a 170 on a preptest before then!)

zeezoo
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Postby zeezoo » Wed Jun 13, 2007 11:30 pm

*bump*

because this thread is that good.

ig1983
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RC stgrategies

Postby ig1983 » Sat Jun 30, 2007 9:17 am

I have been studying for the past couples study sessions using voyager's RC strategy. Does anyone recommend any other strategies or modifications? Just curious?

pithypike
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Re:

Postby pithypike » Mon Apr 21, 2008 5:24 pm

Voyager wrote:Finally, in addition to the above, you have to be a fast and competent reader who can read for content. The above will help, but nothing is better than just doing tons of reading passages over and over (use the above techniques when you practice... you will need the above skills anyway as an attorney so you might as well learn them now). You need to learn to read quickly and to understand the stuff quickly. If you were in the brown reading group in 2nd grade, thought reading books and writing papers was for "dorks" in high school, graduated from some shit-hole college (anything with the word "state" in the title, for example) or any combination of the previous, you will have a difficult time with the LSAT. All I can say is work on it.


Meh. I went to a fairly mediocre state university for undergrad. My initial diag. was 166 and so far I've gotten a few 180s. (without your study plans :lol: ) I went to an in state, public undergrad because I wanted a cheap (re: free) education and knew it didn't matter a whole lot for applying to law school. Who is the really the smart one here, some elitist (such as yourself) who pays 30k a year for a top private undergrad and goes to a top ranked law program, or a pragmatist (such as myself) who gets a free undergraduate education and goes to a top ranked law program as well?

I would hesitate to generalize too much about the quality of students coming out of mediocre undergrads.

Baron
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Baron » Tue Apr 22, 2008 12:53 pm

Thanks voyager 8)

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TheGreatNorthwest
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Re: Re:

Postby TheGreatNorthwest » Tue Apr 22, 2008 4:34 pm

pithypike wrote:
Voyager wrote:Finally, in addition to the above, you have to be a fast and competent reader who can read for content. The above will help, but nothing is better than just doing tons of reading passages over and over (use the above techniques when you practice... you will need the above skills anyway as an attorney so you might as well learn them now). You need to learn to read quickly and to understand the stuff quickly. If you were in the brown reading group in 2nd grade, thought reading books and writing papers was for "dorks" in high school, graduated from some shit-hole college (anything with the word "state" in the title, for example) or any combination of the previous, you will have a difficult time with the LSAT. All I can say is work on it.


Meh. I went to a fairly mediocre state university for undergrad. My initial diag. was 166 and so far I've gotten a few 180s. (without your study plans :lol: ) I went to an in state, public undergrad because I wanted a cheap (re: free) education and knew it didn't matter a whole lot for applying to law school. Who is the really the smart one here, some elitist (such as yourself) who pays 30k a year for a top private undergrad and goes to a top ranked law program, or a pragmatist (such as myself) who gets a free undergraduate education and goes to a top ranked law program as well?

I would hesitate to generalize too much about the quality of students coming out of mediocre undergrads.


Dont knock Voyager...he is trying to help us improve.

zeezoo
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby zeezoo » Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:44 am

BUMPING because this is almost certainly the most valuable thread on this forum

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Lyov Myshkin
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Lyov Myshkin » Mon Aug 04, 2008 4:53 am

meh. i preferred this one.


Piggy's Guide to Reading Comprehension. (from another forum).

I was bored.
This topic was bothering me.
Listen up.

Reading Comprehension performance, contrary to popular LSD opinion, can be improved. Improvement does NOT involve learning to read faster or getting smarter (although both might help...). Rather, it involves three things: (1) paying attention to the absolutely predictable nature of the RC section, (2) learning to read for the structure of the passage, and (3) managing time.

(1) The Absolutely Predictable Nature of the RC Section.

Some basic facts:
• Four passages in 35 minutes = 8 minutes 45 seconds average per passage.
• Five to eight questions per passage.
• Four passage topics, almost always one each of: humanities, law, social science, and natural science.
• None of the topic types are necessarily harder than the others. In fact, the humanities or law passage is often the most difficult or abstract while the natural science passage is often the most straight forward (but not always, of course).

The Questions
RC is predictable because it only has three broad types of questions:

1. Questions that address the passage as a whole (structure, main point, purpose)
These can usually be answered without much reference to the passage. If you paraphrase the function of each paragraph as you read, these questions should be rather simple.

2. Questions that can be answered directly from the passage (According to the passage, according to the author, etc)
These are also rather simple because the answer can usually be found directly in the passage (or in the case of some EXCEPT questions, the answer is the only thing that can't be found in the passage). If you read for structure you should know where things are located for easy reference. It's FINE and APPROPRIATE to look back at the passage. It's right there, why wouldn't you?

3. Questions that ask you to extrapolate from the passage (Author would agree with, the function of, it can be inferred, etc.)
This type is the most difficult, of course, because the answer might require some thought (oh no!). I'll break it down into two subtypes to make discussion simpler:

3a. General -- question does NOT direct you to a particular place in the passage.
Without any concrete place for reference, you'll need to consider the passage as a whole. These questions typically deal with the author's mood or position (or the position of a non-author voice within the passage). Paraphrase that entity's mood or position in one sentence then look at the answers.

3b. Specific -- question directs you with line numbers, quotations, useful nouns, etc.
These are a bit more tolerable because you're anchored to a specific place in the passage, so go to that place. Read not only the lines/sentence referenced in the question, but also read the sentence before and after it too. What is the context of what you were directed to read? Does it serve as evidence or conclusion? Which viewpoint does it belong to? etc. Then look at the answers.

Right, that was a bit brief but it's a start. The most important thing is to become familiar with the question types and how to deal with them. RC doesn't have any surprises really (until next June, at least).

(2) Reading for the Structure of the Passage.

We've seen that RC questions ask for three types of information. Use that to your advantage. When you're finished reading the passage, you should be able to answer a few basic questions:

1. The overview -- what was the function of the passage? Advocate, explain, compare, etc.
2. What was the function of each paragraph? One sentence summary of each (mental or jotted) as you read.
3. What were all of the viewpoints? Critic's, Author's, Character's, etc. I like to circle sentences that clearly give an entity's viewpoint -- According to some critics, for example.
4. What evidence do the entities use to support their viewpoints? I like to number these in the margin.
5. Did the author agree with any of the viewpoints? Which one?

If you get that much from the reading the questions should be easy. Don't try to memorize every line or every piece of evidence; you don't need to because you can look at the passage again any time.

(3) Managing Time

I prefer to read the passages straight through in order and answer every question in order. I'm going to answer them all anyway, so why waste time skipping around, right? This is the ideal situation but it's not the case for everyone. If you have trouble completing the section you might consider this strategy:

1. Flip through the section and note the number of questions for each passage.
2. Start on the passage with the MOST questions.
3. End on the passage with the LEAST questions.

Why? Time investment.

It will take you around 3 minutes to read a passage no matter how many questions are on the passage. In other words, the reading time investment is roughly the same for every passage. You can get more potential points for the same time investment by starting on the passage with the most questions. Also, if you do run out of time, you've left the passage with the fewest questions -- that means fewer guesses.

also adding my lists of questions to guide you in your passage analysis.

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ColtonDLong
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Re:

Postby ColtonDLong » Tue Aug 05, 2008 2:00 pm

Voyager wrote:Mastering the above is the formula for top performance on reading comp. It amazes me that some test prep programs don't teach this approach to reading comp. Reading comp should be just as easy as logic games after mastering the technique. I saw both of those sections as "gimme" sections.

Logical Reasoning, on the other hand is a completely different story.... that is about 10-12 different approaches you just have to learn through practice... I will also say that mastering logical reasoing, since it is MORE THAN HALF of the test is REALLY the key to a top score. If you can average only 2 wrong on each logical reasoning section, you are totally set.

I hope the above helps. Let me know if I missed anything or if you have any questions. Good luck.

One last point: if you are going to prepare for the LSAT, DO IT. That means, you need to spend AT LEAST 1 hour per day studying and should invest about 15-20 hours per week. This is assuming you are working a full time job. If you are a college student, then the summer of your junior year whould be devoted to LSAT 40 hours per week. This is THE most important criteria for admission. Do not fuck this up. No amount of "I was the rush-leader for my sorority" extra-curriculars will overcome a bad score.


Voyager, I don't agree with this. I took work off this summer to study and find it nearly impossible tostudy for more than 20 hours productively. Unless your diag. test is in the 130s or 140s (I was at 158, and m now at 168), and don't find it plausible or even beneficial.

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isaaca
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Re: Re:

Postby isaaca » Tue Aug 05, 2008 2:10 pm

ColtonDLong wrote:
Voyager wrote:Mastering the above is the formula for top performance on reading comp. It amazes me that some test prep programs don't teach this approach to reading comp. Reading comp should be just as easy as logic games after mastering the technique. I saw both of those sections as "gimme" sections.

Logical Reasoning, on the other hand is a completely different story.... that is about 10-12 different approaches you just have to learn through practice... I will also say that mastering logical reasoing, since it is MORE THAN HALF of the test is REALLY the key to a top score. If you can average only 2 wrong on each logical reasoning section, you are totally set.

I hope the above helps. Let me know if I missed anything or if you have any questions. Good luck.

One last point: if you are going to prepare for the LSAT, DO IT. That means, you need to spend AT LEAST 1 hour per day studying and should invest about 15-20 hours per week. This is assuming you are working a full time job. If you are a college student, then the summer of your junior year whould be devoted to LSAT 40 hours per week. This is THE most important criteria for admission. Do not fuck this up. No amount of "I was the rush-leader for my sorority" extra-curriculars will overcome a bad score.


Voyager, I don't agree with this. I took work off this summer to study and find it nearly impossible tostudy for more than 20 hours productively. Unless your diag. test is in the 130s or 140s (I was at 158, and m now at 168), and don't find it plausible or even beneficial.


I study on average about 37 hrs/week. But then again, my first diag. was a 136. I decided to go to law school quite late in the game; about 3 days before my first diag. so i was quite blind as for what to expect. Im testing a little below your range now... but more than 20 hours can be beneficial for anybody...

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ColtonDLong
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby ColtonDLong » Tue Aug 05, 2008 3:18 pm

Yeah...I don't really buy it. How do you study for that long productively?

Darth Topher
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Darth Topher » Tue Aug 05, 2008 3:34 pm

very cool thread

zeezoo
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby zeezoo » Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:03 pm

VOYAGER hasn't posted on this forum in over six months so he won't be here to respond. I believe he taught for Kaplan and synthesized his material from a variety of sources.

But for the newer posters to this forum, Voyager's methods were highly respected by a great deal of posters.

IMHO, this RC strategy is better than anything printed in any books.

It is very possible to study more than 20 hours a week, and has been done by many peopleon this forum.
Last edited by zeezoo on Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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isaaca
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby isaaca » Tue Aug 05, 2008 4:04 pm

ColtonDLong wrote:Yeah...I don't really buy it. How do you study for that long productively?


Well, i've devised a schedule that keeps me on track with my progress. I'm taking the BP solo curriculum so I finish a certain amount of lessons within an allotted amount of time.

And just like you, i'm not working this summer.

Robert398
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Robert398 » Wed Aug 06, 2008 7:06 pm

zeezoo wrote:VOYAGER hasn't posted on this forum in over six months so he won't be here to respond. I believe he taught for Kaplan and synthesized his material from a variety of sources.

But for the newer posters to this forum, Voyager's methods were highly respected by a great deal of posters.

IMHO, this RC strategy is better than anything printed in any books.

It is very possible to study more than 20 hours a week, and has been done by many peopleon this forum.



Yes. Though you WILL want to take breaks. It's like working out, do it hard and with effort, but don't overtrain

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Lyov Myshkin
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Lyov Myshkin » Wed Aug 06, 2008 8:56 pm

ColtonDLong wrote:Yeah...I don't really buy it. How do you study for that long productively?


i study almost every day. but i tend to read tons of extraneous material and i force myself to take a good hour or two hour break in the middle of the day. like today, i went through kaplan's (i think) mcat prep book to do their reading comprehension tests which are like crazy intense compared to lsat ones. this book had two practice verbal sections with like 9 passages with a total of, i can't remember precisely, over 50 questions that you gotta do in like 65 minutes. i ignored the time limit since that would mean i'd finish half the test, and did both of them earlier today, took like three hours. now, i'm taking a break, dicking around on the internet, probably gonna play guitar for a bit, and then take a prep test at about 7:30. so yeah, absolutely you can study your ass off and be productive. just gotta be creative with what stuff you end up studying.

zeezoo
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby zeezoo » Wed Aug 06, 2008 10:50 pm

weird. my friend destroyed the mcat and she said LSAT RC was much harder

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Lyov Myshkin
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby Lyov Myshkin » Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:13 am

it's just sooo long. there are like 9 fricking passages. it turns my attention span into rubble.

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ColtonDLong
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby ColtonDLong » Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:53 pm

Robert398 wrote:
zeezoo wrote:VOYAGER hasn't posted on this forum in over six months so he won't be here to respond. I believe he taught for Kaplan and synthesized his material from a variety of sources.

But for the newer posters to this forum, Voyager's methods were highly respected by a great deal of posters.

IMHO, this RC strategy is better than anything printed in any books.

It is very possible to study more than 20 hours a week, and has been done by many peopleon this forum.



Yes. Though you WILL want to take breaks. It's like working out, do it hard and with effort, but don't overtrain


Ok...let me be a politician, and rephrase what I meant. I DO study for over that, and, IMHO, I don't think it is reasonable to study for more than 30 to 35 unless you are cramming. LOD-R hits you after than.

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kyle
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby kyle » Thu Aug 07, 2008 3:29 pm

sounds like kaplan to me.


i used to do this strategy and quickly retained more points when i stopped. differnet stuff works for different people. for me i need to read the entire article, then answer the questions based on the main idea of the passage.... works for me :o

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RVP11
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby RVP11 » Thu Aug 07, 2008 3:33 pm

kyle wrote:sounds like kaplan to me.


i used to do this strategy and quickly retained more points when i stopped. differnet stuff works for different people. for me i need to read the entire article, then answer the questions based on the main idea of the passage.... works for me :o


Same here. I did best on RC when I dropped all forms of underlining/boxing strategy and just read the passages normally and answered the questions. I underlined what I thought was important, but realized I was so inconsistent on underlining what I needed to; it was too hard to predict what they would ask.

The one strategy that worked for me in June was doing the passages in the right order, starting with the passage with the most questions and finishing with the passage with the fewest. My -2 could have easily been -5 had I not done that.

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ColtonDLong
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby ColtonDLong » Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:24 pm

jsporter wrote:
kyle wrote:sounds like kaplan to me.


i used to do this strategy and quickly retained more points when i stopped. differnet stuff works for different people. for me i need to read the entire article, then answer the questions based on the main idea of the passage.... works for me :o


Same here. I did best on RC when I dropped all forms of underlining/boxing strategy and just read the passages normally and answered the questions. I underlined what I thought was important, but realized I was so inconsistent on underlining what I needed to; it was too hard to predict what they would ask.

The one strategy that worked for me in June was doing the passages in the right order, starting with the passage with the most questions and finishing with the passage with the fewest. My -2 could have easily been -5 had I not done that.


That strategy works for me too. Aside for my Diagnostic, I've never gotten more than 5 wrong on RC with or without a strategy, but I think some people need an extra push. RC is tough sections for some. For me it is only the timing, which I seem to be fine on (usually)

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JPeavy44
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Re: Voyager's RC Strategy

Postby JPeavy44 » Thu Aug 07, 2008 9:06 pm

The hardest part of RC for me is stamina. It's so damn long, and if I had both LR sections before it, it's even harder.




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