Great Advice on How to get 160+ on the LSAT...

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FutureMarineJAG
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Postby FutureMarineJAG » Fri Jun 15, 2007 12:48 pm

I just ordered the two powerbook bibles, and plan to enroll for some private hours with powerbook. I have also ordered a number of the practice tests... My goal is to get between a 168-171, Ive done well on both the LR and LG as I usually get around 23 to 25 correct on each section, I seem to have a hard time with the RC portion of the exam.

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themillsman22
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Postby themillsman22 » Sat Jun 30, 2007 7:01 pm

1) What score did you get? 166

2) What books did you use? (Kaplan, Powerscore LRB, Powerscore LGB, etc)

LR Bible: Mildly recommend.
Kaplan LSAT 180: Eh, it's ok. The Logic Games are so ridiculous that it makes the actual ones seem easy, but the other sections are weak.
Barron's Passkey: Nothing special.
McGraw Hill: Nothing special either. Gets you acquainted with the test like any basic review book.
All 3 of the 10 actual LSATs books: Obviously, as many have said before, this is the key. (Especially if you review and learn from mistakes ACTIVELY)

That said, if I could do it all over, I'd still probably buy all the books. The non powerscore books are usually around 20 bucks (Passkey is only 8 bucks), and they all have more practice problems and tests.

3) What prep courses did you take (if any)? Full length, weekend?

NONE.

4) How long did you study for, and under what conditions? (during school, during the summer, etc)

I started about 2.5 months before, and spent about a month reading basic books and getting acquainted with the test. Then during finals and after school I probably took one preptest a day for a solid month. About 2 weeks before the test I broke my leg and didn't take as many preptests religiously, which probably affected my rhythm come test day.

5) How many preptests did you do?
~40 total, ~30 official preptests.

6) What would you change if you were to do it again?
I would have taken a few more tests with other people or done something to better mimic the pressure of the actual exam. It didn't factor in too much on the exam day, but anything can happen. I think I would have focused less on taking preptests everyday, and done more studying. I think that's the only way I could have improved my peak because I plateaued at the low 170s.

7) Any other misc comments/suggestions.

Before the test I was ranging from 169-172 or so on my prep tests. Test day, 166. Such is life.

My best advice is to actually read this thread, because I would have modified my study habits much earlier had I been a member of TLS then. I don't think a prep course is necessary if you have the dedication and self-discipline to study consistently by yourself, and if you can learn well from reading. The Powerscore books are definitely a good investment.
Good luck to everyone, and I hope my advice helped someone else like other people's advice helped me.


I'll post in about 3.5 months after I get my retake score and update how things went that time around.

Tipheret
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Postby Tipheret » Sat Jun 30, 2007 8:34 pm

1) What score did you get?

175

2) What books did you use?

Powerscore LGB - the single best book I used. I started out with a 161 diagnostic score. I missed 8-12 questions per game section at first. I went through the entire LGB before taking any more tests, and my score jumped five points. Then I went back and reviewed after 5-10 more tests, and my games score jumped even more. By the end, I was only missing 1 question on the games on practice tests; I only missed 1 in games on my real test, too.

Powerscore LRB - didn't use this one very much. It seemed pretty comprehensive, though, and I probably could have raised my score a few more points by finishing it.

Official Preptest Books - These should be anyone's meat and potatoes. I bought 3 of them (30 tests), and did every single one.

Kaplan LSAT - Kaplan materials were spectacularly unhelpful for me.

Kaplan 180 - This is a minor exception to the above rule. Kaplan 180 should be the very last book you use, if you plan to use it at all. The games in 180 are ridiculous and retarded, the kind of stuff you would never, ever see on a real LSAT, but they're reasonable practice if you already know how to do games.

3) What prep courses did you take (if any)?

None.


4) How long did you study for, and under what conditions? (during school, during the summer, etc)

I simulated real conditions as closely as I could, taking pretty much 1 LSAT a day from May to June during summer break.

5) How many preptests did you do?

30 real ones, plus 3 simulated ones from Kaplan.

6) What would you change if you were to do it again?

I'd finish the LR Bible and never buy the Kaplan materials. I'd also start practicing a little earlier than I did, and practice more religiously. Also the most recent preptest I had was 45, and that was a huge mistake.

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UberLSAT
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Postby UberLSAT » Sat Jun 30, 2007 8:42 pm

I posted this on it's own thread, but of course this is a good place for it too:

How I got a 178

I've gotten some PMs asking about my study methods so I thought I'd share. I definitely feel that I was lucky to get the score that I did, as I walked out of there feeling like I had missed at about 5 questions and hoping that the scale would give me a 177. I'd be embarassed to tell you which ones I did miss, because they were a couple of the easiest questions on the entire exam, in LG which I normally ace. Both were at the beginning of my first section, and I'm pretty sure I was a little thrown off and distracted by actual test conditions (having people around me, etc.)

I didn't take any prep course. Normally classes like that make me feel like I am being talked down to at least some of the time, which makes me bored and frustrated and keeps me from paying attention when they get to the part that matters. That's just a matter of personal experience though; I am not in general against prep courses, and probably some courses are not like that. Historically I also have had good luck studying for standarized tests on my own from books, so I didn't feel that it was necessary to spend the money.

The very first thing I did was read every word of the "preparing for the LSAT" pdf from LSAC. I worked through all the problems therein, untimed, and was pleased to discover that I got them all right. I thought this would bode well for my future.

Second, I took a Kaplan diagnostic (using their software) and got an appallingly bad 156. Then I worked through the lessons in their software, and took the two additional practice exams therein, scoring 152 and 165. It's not clear that the practice tests in software have very good diagnostic value, though, because they are on screen which makes a lot of the problem types harder to manage. At this point I was very confused about the difference between inferences and assumptions -- it seems silly now -- but the software helped a bit.

My worst section at this point was LG -- like most people early on in their LSAT practice, I would run out of time well before finishing a section. After finishing the Kaplan software, I worked through the LG bible; then took all the LG sections from 1 to 34 under timed conditions; if I ran out of time I would note where I had stopped and then continued to finish the section; I also noted how much time I spent on each of the 4 problem sets, though it's not clear whether or how this information helped.

During the time that I was working through the LG bible, I also did about 3 full modern LSATs per week, starting with #35 and going forward. After finishing each one I would study all the problems I had missed, and try to figure out how to better set up the games to save time.

At this point my LG performance was really solid -- generally I could finish the games in about 20 minutes, and have 15 minutes left to rework anything that seemed hard or confusing. My LG and RC were both averaging around -2 per section (helps to have kept taking a few practice tests while studying LGs, because I had a good idea of my relative LR and RC performance at this point). Since -2 LR per section is -4 per test, I decided to move on to the LR bible. I read everything in the bible, but skipped the problem sets because a lot of them contain the problems from modern tests, and I did not want to spoil those tests' practice value. Now I was trying to do 5 full tests per week.

(BTW I disagree with the LR bible on one important topic -- I do better if I read the question stems first. There's an example that should be famous, of an LR passage where the stimulus has statements from two people but the question only asks what person #1 thought -- to this day I have never read what person #2 said. That's an extreme example, but in general I think it's easier to focus on the relevant information if you know what you are looking for; and often the question will be one of a few standard choices, which you can recognize at a glance. However, on the RC passages I read the passage first, because it's too hard to remember that many questions and also take in the passage. Anyway, back to the study plan.)

Finally my LR was down to an average of -1 per test; meanwhile as I moved forward with the full length practice tests my RC scores were getting worse, settling around -4 per test, so that my overall average per test was a steady 175. I later found out this probably had something to do with RC getting slightly harder as you move forward from #35 to the present.

All that was left to do was to shore up my RC score. I went back through all my previous tests and studied all the questions I had gotten wrong. I added an extra RC section (from the premodern tests, working backward from #34) to each of my practice tests as an "experimental" section. For a while I tried Voyager's method of writing down a short summary of each paragraph as you go but this did not seem to help and I eventually gave up on it. I did find it helpful to, as he says, box every name and every term that is defined, and underline words that indicate a point of view or a transition. I also put a star next to anything that sounded like a main point or conclusion. For passages that had 4-5 paragraphs, if any questions asked about a paragraph by number, I would write the paragraph number next to each one to avoid stupid mistakes. If the passage was easy for me (I'm a science person) I would do very little underlining and try to get through the passage and questions quickly, so that I would have more time to work through the more difficult passages.

There aren't any shortcuts, or at least I didn't come upon them. Just practice practice practice, under conditions as close to the actual test as you can manage.

The most important thing that helped me was improving time management. I learned to work very quickly on questions that were easy, to try and save up some time to go back to the tough questions after the end. As you read in the bibles, the questions get harder as you go through the section, and if you get cocky because you made it through the first 10 questions in 12 minutes you can still very easily run out of time by the end. I was trying to make it through the first 15 in 15 minutes. Any time I thought I had the right answer but wasn't completely sure, I'd draw a box around it; and if a question was taking too long, I would mark my best current guess and then draw a box with a star in the corner and move on (after 2 minutes you should to move on from any LR question; and after 10 minutes you should move on from an RC passage or game, unless it's the last one and you don't have anything you badly want to recheck). On the actual test I had about 10 minutes left at the end of each LR section to go back and rethink all the hard questions, and a similar amount of time on the RC. My first section, the LG, is where I made my two scored mistakes, I think because the unfamiliar conditions distracted me and slowed me down.

If I could do it again, I would at least once want to have someone "proctor" the test, where they keep time for me, so that I would get used to starting and stopping my timer when someone else was keeping time (stupid I know but I only properly used my timer on 2-3 sections of the actual test); and at least once do a practice test in a public place like a library or bookstore, to get used to ignoring the distractions of people around me; alternatively it might've helped to practice with a news broadcast running behind me, though that might've been too extreme. I believe if I had done this I'd have aced the LG section too and made a 180 -- not that I'm too upset, but don't get me wrong, those two questions will definitely haunt my dreams if I don't get into my top choice school.

Followup: someone asked how long this took -- it was about 2 1/2 months, probably around 40 hours per week. Sheesh.

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Pyke
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Postby Pyke » Sun Jul 01, 2007 1:51 pm

1) What score did you get?

166

2) What books did you use?

Uh....I bought 3....a McGraw Hill thing, Kaplan 180 and a Princeton Review book.

I don't particularly recommend any of them.

3) What prep courses did you take (if any)?

None.


4) How long did you study for, and under what conditions? (during school, during the summer, etc)

1 month.


5) How many preptests did you do?

1, simulated.

6) What would you change if you were to do it again?

Not rely on pure intelligence. Basically, I relied on my ability as opposed to techniques.

Make sure I do my research in advance. I had a goal of 160+ cause that's what I thought I needed. After writing I determined I needed 170+.

Do more prep tests, because fatigue was a factor.

The best thing I learned in the prep test I did, don't look for the right answer. Look for why the answer is wrong, only 1 answer can be right.

I am taking it again in Sept.

happy
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Bombed June 2007 LSAT 132

Postby happy » Sun Jul 01, 2007 8:34 pm

I suck at this LSAT thing. I really desire to become a lawyer, but can't pass the LSAT. May retake in September 2007. But, I need a tutor, a professor, and 40 hrs a week practice and the pastor before I think I have a chance at a 150 even. Any advice?

Go Bears
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Postby Go Bears » Sun Jul 01, 2007 9:00 pm

1) What score did you get? 169

2) What books did you use? (Kaplan, Powerscore LRB, Powerscore LGB, etc) Powescore Logic Games Bible, Also did a little bit with the Powerscore Logical Reasoning Bible, but LR came pretty naturally to me. I took pretty much every single issued official PrepTest, as well. I had some other books that I didn't use that much - Big Fat Genius, Kaplan 180, etc.

Another book that really helped that a lot of people don't seem to know about is the "Get Prepped!" LSAT Explained series. There are two of them, for the most recent of the 10-test official books. They explain each test question by question. It was very, very helpful with grasping Reading Comprehension.

Also, the LSAT Superprep book was helpful for the same reason.

3) What prep courses did you take (if any)? Full length, weekend? None. Entirely self-study

4) How long did you study for, and under what conditions? (during school, during the summer, etc) I took my first PrepTest cold in the first couple days of January and studied from there on out at a pretty steady pace. I had a couple times where there was a week break or so, but mostly I tried to keep it leisurely and then used the last month or so to really hone my consistency and keep myself sharp.

5) How many preptests did you do? Pretty much everyone that's been released, with the exception of maybe some random LR and RC sections in the blue 10-test book. There were also some sections that I took more than once - lots of games ones in particular. I hardly ever remembered them the second time around. (though I missed four on the games on test day).

I took full prep tests about once a week, but had to be careful with that because 1. I work full-time and am married, so that can be time consuming. And I'd end up worrying only about my score instead of trying to learn from my performance. I was like a horse better chasing his losses at times, which defeats the purpose. You can really get wrapped up in the PrepTest scores.

I didn't think endurance would be a problem for me, so early on I decided I only was going to take single sections to keep the intensity up. I was shouted down on this board for that notion by people who thought I wasn't giving enough respect to the endurance required, yada, yada, yada. In reality, I was correct. Endurance never bothered me at all - I only missed one on my last section of the real test, my best section on the test.

I think most test takers would do well to concentrate on single sections instead of full PrepTests. The importance of the task usually makes concentration and endurance no issue on test day, I imagine. I would get bored as hell doing full PrepTests. It's a shock I did as well as I did on them (as high as 174, usually between about 168-172 or so on the last few).

6) What would you change if you were to do it again? I would concentrate way more on figuring out why I missed questions, particularly on games. I can be neurotic, so I'd blow a game and instead of trying to figure it out, I would instead try to take another game right away to get my confidence back up. Dumb, obviously, but you can be irrational in the moment.

I would have probably been way more methodical about my games learning if I had it to do over again. I don't feel like I was very patient, and may have cost myself having the kind of confident base that I would have needed to ace that section.

7) Any other misc comments/suggestions. A lot of people get frustrated by RC. I was for a while, too. But you can get the hang of it. Put the time in, just like the other sections.

Also, don't cut corners because of cost, if possible whatsoever. This is the most important test you'll take in your life. No shortcuts.

Also - I would always order the eight dollar official PrepTests from LSAC instead of trying to mooch PDFs off people. It felt so much more official and exciting getting that booklet in the mail with the colored cover, etc., etc. Just a little mental trick that helped me.
Last edited by Go Bears on Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

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alexb240
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Postby alexb240 » Sun Jul 01, 2007 10:57 pm

1) What score did you get?

177

2) What books did you use?

LG Bible, LR Bible, three books of 10 official preptests each.


3) What prep courses did you take (if any)?

None... and generally speaking, I wouldn't recommend it. The strategies can be learned from the books the companies put out... many of which you can find cheap on ebay. Heck, I saw LSAT180 at my library! And you can use this forum and others like it for advice, guidance, commiserating, etc.

4) How long did you study for, and under what conditions? (during school, during the summer, etc)

I studied for about three months, beginning around mid-March when I was in the middle of a very busy college semester. During this time I studied about an hour a day-- working through the Bibles. However, come late April I had to take a three week hiatus in order to fully concentrate on finals. After that, I began doing about a half of a prep test a day until the last ten days, in which I did one prep-test each.

5) How many preptests did you do?

Total... about 15 to 20, probably. Of those, around 12 or so were under strict time conditions. I started at a 166 diagnostic, then went to 167 after finishing the LG Bible, and my third was a 179 after finishing the LR Bible. After that I fairly consistently oscillated between 175 and 180.

6) What would you change if you were to do it again?

I would have tried to avoid my three week hiatus. My practice score dropped by about six or seven points upon the resumption of study. More generally, I don't think you should take a long break. You want to stay focused on the task at hand. Heck, I did a preptest the day before and felt as though I learned from it. I even did some questions that morning!

7) Any other misc comments/suggestions.

There's the obvious: don't change your routine up in the slightest come LSAT day. Make sure you eat the same dinner and breakfast as you have in times past, make sure you are sharp at the appropriate time, etc.

Something else: Make sure you do several tests under strict timed conditions and in noisy areas (a coffee shop or bookstore). The LSAT is a predictable test: you can always expect difficult questions at a certain juncture (ie, 15 to 20 in the LR section). Make sure you've "banked" enough time to really study those questions for 1m45s or what-have-you.

There's more I could say, but that seems like enough for now. If anyone is interested, PM me! I would be glad to help!

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alexb240
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Postby alexb240 » Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:11 pm

One further comment: I'm a big believer in reviewing the mistakes you make on your practice tests. Don't just figure out what the right answer is and why... attempt to discern a trend and determine why you are missing certain types of questions. If you are only having trouble with parallel flaw questions, for example, it makes little sense to take a whole other prep-test that may only contain a few of those q-types. You'd be far better off intensively studying that section of the appropriate Bible and finding similar questions to try online.

Hawkeye
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Postby Hawkeye » Mon Jul 02, 2007 12:55 pm

Question to UberLsat: Other than skipping the hardest questions on the LR sections and returning to them in the end, did you do the questions in order? Same with the LG and RC? My instructor claims that it is better to not do questions and games in order, but I find it counterintuitive somehow. Especially the games. And it kind of nags at me when I have to keep in mind to return to something. Did you really save time doing this (returning to more difficult questions in the end), or did you save time simply because you had a solid performance and fast thinking?

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UberLSAT
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Postby UberLSAT » Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:23 pm

Whether to skip around in the LG and RC depends on your strategy. If your goal is to finish the section then looking through the questions before you start is a complete waste of time. If your goal is to finish 2-3 sections only (which can be a good strategy for some people) then certainly it is worth identifying which one looks hardest to you.

You should never skip around in the LR because the questions have such a strong general trend of starting with the easy ones and moving on to harder ones.

Hawkeye
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Postby Hawkeye » Mon Jul 02, 2007 2:26 pm

Thanks. That's exactly how I feel about it. I never skip and was feeling bad when I heard the seemingly general advice it was possibly a good thing to do so. I haven't had the need to skip on LR. Would you advise the same for the LG if I intend to finish all of the games anyway? I mean, the instructor said it was good to try to do the easier games first, but mentioned nothing about it depending on whether or not I wanted to finish the section. I have a hard time determining whether a game is "easy" or "hard". They kind of seem all the same to me, it's just that some take a little more time.

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Kompressor
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Postby Kompressor » Mon Jul 02, 2007 4:38 pm

1) What score did you get? 165

2) What books did you use? (Kaplan, Powerscore LRB, Powerscore LGB, etc) I had one games book and then a bunch of old prep tests.

3) What prep courses did you take (if any)? Full length, weekend? I took a full Kaplan course and quit halfway into it because I didn't like many of their methods. However, what Kaplan did do was give me access to every released question in the history of the LSAT and that was invaluable.

4) How long did you study for, and under what conditions? (during school, during the summer, etc) I studied for about 3 months with a full-time job that oftentimes had heavy overtime.

5) How many preptests did you do? Timed and scaled, 3 or 4.

6) What would you change if you were to do it again? I'm not sure there is much that I would change. If there was a way to pay for the Kaplan books instead of taking the class, I'd probably go back and do that instead.

7) Any other misc comments/suggestions. I would suggest that you sit down and study for a few weeks before deciding whether or not to take a class. You may or may not find that studing by yourself is the best method. I would also suggest building up stamina slowly. At first, go over 1 question at a time, then increase to 4 or 5. Then start timing yourself, then move up to 10-15, and then start doing timed sections. I found that doing sections was far more valuable than doing entire tests.

happy
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Silent Timer?

Postby happy » Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:32 pm

What in the world?!

happy
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KAPLAN STINKS!

Postby happy » Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:33 pm

I'M USING POWERSCORE THIS TIME AROUND? ALREADY DOING BETTER IN MY THINKING AND IDENTIFYING DETAILS.

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Ralph Wiggum
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Postby Ralph Wiggum » Fri Jul 06, 2007 11:11 am

1) What score did you get?

172 (94/100)

2) What books did you use?

LG Bible (excellent), LR Bible (fair), and LSAC's Superprep (good for the preptests)

3) What prep courses did you take (if any)?

None.

4) How long did you study for, and under what conditions? (during school, during the summer, etc)

2.5 months. during the week, i studied about an hour per day after work. i took full-length tests on the weekends.

5) How many preptests did you do?

about 15 full tests and every LG section i could find (i sucked at LG!).

6) What would you change if you were to do it again?

i would have taken a prepcourse to keep myself motivated. i got pretty burned out after the first month or so. my practice scores typically ranged from 171 to 176 (ave ~173). a 175+ on the real thing would have been nice but i'm still pretty happy with my score.

7) Any other misc comments/suggestions.

on the LR, learn when and where to trust your first instinct. in spite of (what i considered to be) a lot of studying, my LR scores never improved all that much from day 1 to the real thing. beware: the LR Bible actually hurt my practice scores b/c the change in reasoning caused me to overthink the questions. i quickly got rid of it, resumed my natural methods, and my LR scores returned to normal. trust your instincts...they are probably right!

as an added advantage, using an instinctive approach to LR will allow you to save a TON of time. i routinely finished LR sections with 5+ minutes to spare. one the real thing, i finished one LR section 12 minutes early!

i never had much of a problem with RC. i started off missing 2-3. after i implemented a couple tips from voyager's RC plan, i improved that to 0-1. the main things i changed: underlining important phrases and boxing names and key terms. always read slowly enough to understand every word.

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UberLSAT
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Postby UberLSAT » Fri Jul 06, 2007 11:17 am

Hi Ralph,

Your post reminded me of some advice I got while preparing, along the same lines of trusting your instincts: Once you've chosen an answer, you shouldn't change it unless you have two reasons why.

If you were going to retake, I think you should take another crack at the LR bible. I found it somewhat harmful at first, but I kept working with their methods and ultimately found it helpful.

bobbyd
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Postby bobbyd » Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:27 pm

Your score is really solid. I would not retake that thingie ralphie :).

fids
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Postby fids » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:28 pm

Ralph i experienced the same thing!! I ready the bible and it dropped my score. I took the june test and dropped ten points form my average because of my performance on the arguments. That section is a such a gamble for me, either ace or bomb. Any advice ralph?

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mystfan1
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My score...

Postby mystfan1 » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:44 pm

Hello there!

1) 164

2) I used all the Kaplan books that came with the course.

3) I took the Kaplan course that started in late February and was every Sunday until the June test.

4) I studied a TON, every day for at least three hours, doing games, the kaplan workshops, the homework, timed sections (pacing practice), individual problem types (mastery practice) and timed tests (endurance practice). I spent ENDLESS hours doing it and it was never far from my mind.

5) I took six preptests, four of which were administered by Kaplan, the last one being at the ACTUAL testing site, which was really nice.

6) If I could do it again I'd study for about six months instead of three.

7) The Kaplan course REALLY helped me. Believe it or not, my diagnostic test was a 148!!!! Ha. Next test was 152, then 158, then 159. The highest one I did by myself was a 162. My actual score was two points higher than that, 90th percentile, which I was really happy with. It was worth the $1300 investment, and I'll probably use their admissions counseling services to help me get into Vanderbilt. :)

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Ralph Wiggum
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Postby Ralph Wiggum » Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:08 pm

If you were going to retake, I think you should take another crack at the LR bible.


lol. not a chance in hell.

Any advice ralph?


fids, the only other advice i can offer is to become very comfortable with formal logic (the formal logic supplement in the LR bible is actually pretty good.) i used formal logic diagrams all over the place in LR, as well as occasionally in RC.

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brokendowncar
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Postby brokendowncar » Sat Jul 14, 2007 1:09 pm

1) 175+

2) All Kaplan materials

3) Full Kaplan course

4) I took the once a week class for a few months, but did not really see much progress until the summer rolled around and I began to devote 2-3 hours a day to studying

5) 15-20

6) What would you change if you were to do it again? More preptests and I would start them EOD 5 weeks out instead of 3.

7) My diagnostic was a 165, and after ~10 sessions of the Kaplan course I scored a 168. I feel like that is about the level of improvement you can expect if you only take a class and do not spend much time on your own studying. When I was finished with finals, I had about 5 weeks to prepare for the June LSAT. The first two weeks I did all of the homework that I had been putting off for the course. For the final three weeks I took a prep test about every other day. My scores on those tests were, in order, 172, 172, 172, 174, 171, 177, 175, 178, 179, 180, 177, 179. As you can see, there was a sharp upward trend for my scores as I took the prep tests and studied my mistakes on each one. When you use the explanations provided with prep tests to see why you missed questions, it is really like you have a personal tutor. You will be able to see exactly where you need work, and the explanations will tell you how to improve. Take every prep test you can get your hands on, and take a class if you feel like you need extra motivation.
Last edited by brokendowncar on Sun Oct 07, 2007 7:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Origin
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Postby Origin » Sat Jul 14, 2007 1:15 pm

Deleted.
Last edited by Origin on Sat Feb 23, 2008 8:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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brokendowncar
Posts: 175
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2007 12:54 pm

Postby brokendowncar » Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:46 am

Comes with the Kaplan materials, I assumed similar prep guides would provide the same thing. Maybe I was just lucky to have picked Kaplan.

nondescriptuser
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Joined: Wed Jul 04, 2007 2:09 pm

Postby nondescriptuser » Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:37 pm

kayos, LSAC SuperPrep




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