The Official June 2018 Study Thread

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ThaBlackLord

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby ThaBlackLord » Wed Dec 20, 2017 11:20 pm

olympia wrote:
ThaBlackLord wrote:Here is the recap then:

LR: Manhattan & LSAT Trainer
LG: 7Sage
It seems kinda hard to get better at RC. It seems like there is no consensus regarding one book or online course

Yes, perfect. Yeah, getting better at RC is definitely a personal journey. I’m dreading it.

By the way - great username and avatar. :)


And I've heard the RC section has been getting hella hard too :(

PS: Thanks mate :wink:

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olympia

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby olympia » Wed Dec 20, 2017 11:29 pm

ThaBlackLord wrote:
olympia wrote:
ThaBlackLord wrote:Here is the recap then:

LR: Manhattan & LSAT Trainer
LG: 7Sage
It seems kinda hard to get better at RC. It seems like there is no consensus regarding one book or online course

Yes, perfect. Yeah, getting better at RC is definitely a personal journey. I’m dreading it.

By the way - great username and avatar. :)


And I've heard the RC section has been getting hella hard too :(

PS: Thanks mate :wink:


That’s what I’ve heard about RC, too, which is why I’m trying to perfect LG and LR. If I have to miss points, it better be in just RC (because it will be).

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby vwhorley » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:21 pm

Is anyone taking a prep class? I'm leaning towards taking one from a local place here in DC since I haven't been in school for 3 years. Also is there a book that is a good intro to studying?

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby caropie » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:35 pm

Checking in! I see some people looking for materials/plan guidance; here's what I'm planning:

I bought all three Manhattan Prep books (I had Powerscore in my cart up until the day I was ready to purchase, but reviews finally convinced me that Manhattan is geared toward high-scorers, doesn't dwell on obvious basics too much, etc). First things first I took a full diagnostic LSAT (June 2007 is online) and identified weaknesses (LG set-up, RC answer choice navigation, and time management) to inform my study plan.

I plan to work through each book semi quickly (4-5 evenings a week, mixing it up but mostly focusing on getting through LG first, will finish them all by the end of January or mid-Feb probably) then begin taking TIMED PT sections (I subscribe to the notion that it's a waste of time to practice untimed) with 7sage blind review method and thorough review of any mistakes (again, 4-5 evenings a week for a couple hours). Reading the New Yorker each night, playing Sudoku and listening to Thinking LSAT Podcast (highly recommend) when I'm bored. :D

If I am not consistently hitting my target score range by April, I'll consider a course or tutor. Feeling good since we'll have plenty of time for retakes if needed!

Feedback is welcome :)

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby caropie » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:37 pm

vwhorley wrote:Is anyone taking a prep class? I'm leaning towards taking one from a local place here in DC since I haven't been in school for 3 years. Also is there a book that is a good intro to studying?


I stumbled upon the Thinking LSAT Podcast, and one of the host's prep course is called Strategy Prep, based in DC. There is a free Day 1 of class on the site/youtube, but I really like his teaching method. I've heard Kaplan is garbage in case you're considering that.

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby vwhorley » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:43 pm

caropie wrote:
vwhorley wrote:Is anyone taking a prep class? I'm leaning towards taking one from a local place here in DC since I haven't been in school for 3 years. Also is there a book that is a good intro to studying?


I stumbled upon the Thinking LSAT Podcast, and one of the host's prep course is called Strategy Prep, based in DC. There is a free Day 1 of class on the site/youtube, but I really like his teaching method. I've heard Kaplan is garbage in case you're considering that.


Thanks- I have heard Strategy Prep is good and so is Griffon which is another one here. I wasn't planning on Kaplan, but I think I need a class to get me really focused since I have been out of school a little bit

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby caropie » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:43 pm

olympia wrote:
ThaBlackLord wrote:
olympia wrote:
ThaBlackLord wrote:
That’s what I’ve heard about RC, too, which is why I’m trying to perfect LG and LR. If I have to miss points, it better be in just RC (because it will be).


Glad I'm not the only one! I think most of my RC-bombing came from time management freaking me out. Here are some tips I've gather for RC strategies:


Reading Comp Strategies -
•Don’t read sentence if don’t yet fully understand previous sentence, esp in beginning of passage
•Make a prediction about what author’s main point is as you read, to help pay attention
•Once have figured out main point, only then can you skim, but not in the beginning of passage

•Don't get bogged down in trying to understand what the author is saying. Know where the author makes specific claims/arguments, but don't worry too much about understanding them up front. Track the viewpoints and where people agree/disagree. 7Sage approach (Memory Method) of pausing after each paragraph to note the conclusion of that paragraph, then after the passage, skim it and note the overall conclusion.

•Trap wrong answers are typically too strong. Once narrowed it down, going with the weaker answer (especially in inference questions) almost always pays off.

•When you're reading the passage, try to get to a point where you read the whole thing in 1:15-1:30 with 50-60% comprehension.

•If the first question about the passage is a "Main point" question, leave it for last. At that point you will have digested many different aspects of the entire passage via the other Qs

•When the questions direct you to a specific line (as most do), read the three lines above and below that selection to answer it.

•Try taking more time on the passage. Make sure you really understand the tone, logical structure and main point of the paragraph before moving on to the next one. If you want, scribble a 5-7 words next to the para to help you explain to you what the function of the paragraph is. Then, once you hit the questions, try to back-read as little as possible. Obviously don't do it if you have to re-read something, but try to force yourself to eliminate the first 2-3 answers based off your memory and then if you have to, go back and double check/skim to select the correct answer.

•Whenever there's a viewpoint changed, put a big > mark on the left side of the passage.

•slow down and read critically. You should be inquisitive about the passage as you read--for each sentence, you should be asking yourself "why does this matter?"

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Re: June 2018 Prep

Postby caropie » Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:48 pm

Logic wrote:Hi guys,

Since there's a lot of time left before the test date, I'm considering taking a tunneled vision approach to studying. The aim is to focus on mastering a section before moving on to the next. For example, my best and favorite section of the test is the logic games. I see a lot of potential for improvement here, so I've decided to focus solely on the logic games section for the next few weeks. I plan on reading through the entire logic games bible so as to learn the fundamentals before taking on drills. I have a pretty solid logic background and I think it would help me cement the foundation before moving on to the next sections.

I chose to take this approach because I noticed that whenever I take a LG section untimed, I usually get no more than 3 wrong. This led me to conclude that, the time constraint is what I am struggling with. If I can train myself to increase my speed without giving up my accuracy, I am confident that I would do really well on LG.

What are everyone's thought on this approach? Could this lead to burnout? Any suggestions on how to do this efficiently?


Have you looked into 7Sage's Blind Review Method? (https://7sage.com/the-blind-review-how- ... at-part-1/)... This way, you are seeing what your real timed score is, but also your score when you have all the time in the world (then, you can pinpoint whether it's just a timing issue or if you truly are not understanding a certain concept). My thinking is that with this way you are working on both speed and accuracy, and this should of course be paired with thorough AF review of the ones you weren't sure of, got wrong, or worse - the ones you WERE 100% sure of but got wrong.

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olympia

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby olympia » Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:17 pm

caropie wrote:(I subscribe to the notion that it's a waste of time to practice untimed)

Why is this? I’ve only been drilling LG for now both timed and untimed; doing LG problems untimed has made me more intimate with how the games work and I’ve caught nuances that I don’t when I do the games timed and under a rushed setting. I’ve even come up with new and unique methods of solving the games that I wouldn’t have otherwise if I only drilled the games timed. I’m planning to drill both LR and RC untimed for a couple of months before beginning timed drills (and then timed PTs after).

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olympia

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby olympia » Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:56 pm

caropie wrote:
olympia wrote:
ThaBlackLord wrote:
olympia wrote:
ThaBlackLord wrote:
That’s what I’ve heard about RC, too, which is why I’m trying to perfect LG and LR. If I have to miss points, it better be in just RC (because it will be).


Glad I'm not the only one! I think most of my RC-bombing came from time management freaking me out. Here are some tips I've gather for RC strategies:


Reading Comp Strategies -
•Don’t read sentence if don’t yet fully understand previous sentence, esp in beginning of passage
•Make a prediction about what author’s main point is as you read, to help pay attention
•Once have figured out main point, only then can you skim, but not in the beginning of passage

•Don't get bogged down in trying to understand what the author is saying. Know where the author makes specific claims/arguments, but don't worry too much about understanding them up front. Track the viewpoints and where people agree/disagree. 7Sage approach (Memory Method) of pausing after each paragraph to note the conclusion of that paragraph, then after the passage, skim it and note the overall conclusion.

•Trap wrong answers are typically too strong. Once narrowed it down, going with the weaker answer (especially in inference questions) almost always pays off.

•When you're reading the passage, try to get to a point where you read the whole thing in 1:15-1:30 with 50-60% comprehension.

•If the first question about the passage is a "Main point" question, leave it for last. At that point you will have digested many different aspects of the entire passage via the other Qs

•When the questions direct you to a specific line (as most do), read the three lines above and below that selection to answer it.

•Try taking more time on the passage. Make sure you really understand the tone, logical structure and main point of the paragraph before moving on to the next one. If you want, scribble a 5-7 words next to the para to help you explain to you what the function of the paragraph is. Then, once you hit the questions, try to back-read as little as possible. Obviously don't do it if you have to re-read something, but try to force yourself to eliminate the first 2-3 answers based off your memory and then if you have to, go back and double check/skim to select the correct answer.

•Whenever there's a viewpoint changed, put a big > mark on the left side of the passage.

•slow down and read critically. You should be inquisitive about the passage as you read--for each sentence, you should be asking yourself "why does this matter?"

These are great tips. Thank you. I will definitely keep all of these points in mind when I begin drilling RC.

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby caropie » Thu Dec 21, 2017 3:02 pm

olympia wrote:
caropie wrote:(I subscribe to the notion that it's a waste of time to practice untimed)

Why is this? I’ve only been drilling LG for now both timed and untimed; doing LG problems untimed has made me more intimate with how the games work and I’ve caught nuances that I don’t when I do the games timed and under a rushed setting. I’ve even come up with new and unique methods of solving the games that I wouldn’t have otherwise if I only drilled the games timed. I’m planning to drill both LR and RC untimed for a couple of months before beginning timed drills (and then timed PTs after).


I've heard it from a few trusted LSAT experts. It just seems that there a lot of strategies you need to learn to do well on that section that go out the window if time is not an issue (e.g. finding the answer first instead of testing out each answer choice; creating worlds in games so the 3 possible orders are right there and you can whip through the questions). I am definitely going through the books at my own pace to learn how to do each type of game or question before starting timed sections, and plan to do the 7sage blind review method, so you're seeing how you do both timed and if you had all the time in the world (this shows you where your understanding of the question/game wasn't the issue, just time, or, even going back to it with unlimited time you got it wrong, so you still aren't fully understanding it). Whatever works best for you, I just know I'll need to train myself to work within the 35 minutes from the get go.

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby caropie » Thu Dec 21, 2017 3:13 pm

Asst2theRegManager wrote:Checking in! Hopefully.. this will be my first take. I have the PS bibles, the trainer, and a Manhattan book or 2. Not going to lie, my test anxiety is something that I struggle with the most. Anyways, I’m planning on taking my diagnostic this week to see where I’m at.

How are all of you? Plans for the holidays?


Hope you had a good diagnostic!? I have an unsolicited recommendation for you - the Thinking LSAT Podcast. Not only does it keep me in the LSAT/law school admissions mindset instead of some other podcast or music, but they are both LSAT tutors so their familiarity and confidence in mastering the test (and teaching you to master it and jump 15 points) is encouraging/relaxing. They are incredibly jaded about the existence of law school however, so it makes for some entertaining convos. If you can still want to go to law school after hearing them crap all over it, that's a good sign :)

Happy holidays! My wish list was chock full of Practice Test booklets and ready to destroy the next 6 months!

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby cnick » Fri Dec 22, 2017 7:28 pm

Checking in!

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby NotLawDog » Fri Dec 22, 2017 9:01 pm

checkin in! I just went around and had "the talk" with all my friends about how thin my time will be stretched this semester/cycle. The LSAT subreddit reads super high on the PS bibles but here the attitude is very different. Any explanation? My rough study plan is to finish the 3 PS bibles this winter break, then finish the LSAT Trainer and the basics by the end of January before moving to more drill/test based study. Bad idea?

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby annalisekeating » Fri Dec 22, 2017 9:27 pm

Hey everyone, this is my first TLS post! I'm just wondering if anyone here is worried about "burn out" for the June test. I'm currently in my last year of undergrad and planned to start studying for the test over winter break, but I keep seeing posts warning people that if you start studying too early your score may peak weeks before the actual test and/or when the actual test day comes up you may end up doing worse than your past PTs. As I look at study plans online it seems like a lot of people are taking 3-4 months to study for the test, and since I have a full course load, work and a senior thesis to do next semester I don't want to end up over working myself to the point that it lowers my score.

Does anyone else have concerns about this? To people that have taken the LSAT before - did anyone start to feel burnt out leading up to test day?

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Re: June 2018 Prep

Postby Chaimthegreat » Fri Dec 22, 2017 10:55 pm

caropie wrote:
Logic wrote:Hi guys,

Since there's a lot of time left before the test date, I'm considering taking a tunneled vision approach to studying. The aim is to focus on mastering a section before moving on to the next. For example, my best and favorite section of the test is the logic games. I see a lot of potential for improvement here, so I've decided to focus solely on the logic games section for the next few weeks. I plan on reading through the entire logic games bible so as to learn the fundamentals before taking on drills. I have a pretty solid logic background and I think it would help me cement the foundation before moving on to the next sections.

I chose to take this approach because I noticed that whenever I take a LG section untimed, I usually get no more than 3 wrong. This led me to conclude that, the time constraint is what I am struggling with. If I can train myself to increase my speed without giving up my accuracy, I am confident that I would do really well on LG.

What are everyone's thought on this approach? Could this lead to burnout? Any suggestions on how to do this efficiently?


Have you looked into 7Sage's Blind Review Method? (https://7sage.com/the-blind-review-how- ... at-part-1/)... This way, you are seeing what your real timed score is, but also your score when you have all the time in the world (then, you can pinpoint whether it's just a timing issue or if you truly are not understanding a certain concept). My thinking is that with this way you are working on both speed and accuracy, and this should of course be paired with thorough AF review of the ones you weren't sure of, got wrong, or worse - the ones you WERE 100% sure of but got wrong.


Really have to second this- the Blind Review Method is the way to go. It helps you determine whether speed is your issue or if there is flaw in your logical reasoning that you have to brush up on.

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby NotLawDog » Sat Dec 23, 2017 2:23 pm

annalisekeating wrote:Hey everyone, this is my first TLS post! I'm just wondering if anyone here is worried about "burn out" for the June test. I'm currently in my last year of undergrad and planned to start studying for the test over winter break, but I keep seeing posts warning people that if you start studying too early your score may peak weeks before the actual test and/or when the actual test day comes up you may end up doing worse than your past PTs. As I look at study plans online it seems like a lot of people are taking 3-4 months to study for the test, and since I have a full course load, work and a senior thesis to do next semester I don't want to end up over working myself to the point that it lowers my score.

Does anyone else have concerns about this? To people that have taken the LSAT before - did anyone start to feel burnt out leading up to test day?


Its a big fear of mine as well, so I'm also curious what peoples thoughts on this are. Then again, the premature peak thing kinda doesn't make sense to me.

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby Vertigo » Sat Dec 23, 2017 2:25 pm

Checking in! (+ first post) Excited for this adventure~ :lol:

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby vwhorley » Wed Dec 27, 2017 11:01 am

Hi all,

I hope everyone who celebrates had a Merry Christmas and that everyone is enjoying their holiday season :) I received the newest Princeton review "Cracking the LSAT" prep book as a gift and was wondering if anyone has any experience or tips with this? I am still anticipating on taking a class starting in February, but am jump-starting my prep this week while I am off from work.

Secondly, I am also debating between and in-person class and an online class. Does anyone have a recommendation? I have been out of school for 3 years so I'm not sold on either version yet. The online seems more appealing simply because it is about $400 cheaper and still allows me to attend extra help sessions and practice LSATs.

Also, does anyone know the best time to register to take the actual LSAT and how the accommodation process works? Due to a long story, I have never taken a national standardized test before and therefore have not had accommodations in the system. I know I am eligible and received them in undergrad, but any guidance would be appreciated.

Sorry for all the questions, I am VERY new at the LSAT/Law School world and have around a 3.1 GPA from undergrad (various reasons including a different major and personal illness) so I need to do well in order to get some scholarships.

Thank you all and good luck studying!

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olympia

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby olympia » Wed Dec 27, 2017 12:10 pm

I’ll start drilling LG timed next week (PTs 21-40). I’ve been drilling LG games from PTs 1-20 untimed for about a month now. I completely bombed Pure Sequencing games last night (I blame it on my migraine :roll: ).

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Rupert Pupkin

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby Rupert Pupkin » Wed Dec 27, 2017 1:06 pm

olympia wrote:
caropie wrote:(I subscribe to the notion that it's a waste of time to practice untimed)

Why is this? I’ve only been drilling LG for now both timed and untimed; doing LG problems untimed has made me more intimate with how the games work and I’ve caught nuances that I don’t when I do the games timed and under a rushed setting. I’ve even come up with new and unique methods of solving the games that I wouldn’t have otherwise if I only drilled the games timed. I’m planning to drill both LR and RC untimed for a couple of months before beginning timed drills (and then timed PTs after).


Def not worthless in the beginning. I agree with Olympia. Best way to get your accuracy up is untimed.

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby Mikey » Wed Dec 27, 2017 1:19 pm

practicing untimed at first is kind of what you should do..

who cares what your real score is timed if you're just starting out? you need to learn and dissect the test when you first start, and untimed practice is the way to do it. blind review is to be done after you've already practiced a shit ton and are doing PT's, and then once you blind review after a PT you see where your weaknesses still are and you practice untimed for those specific weaknesses.

untimed drilling is definitely not a waste of time unless you're a god and are already practicing in the 170's right off the bat.. I would say most (I'd even go as far as saying all) of the people I know who got a 170+ all did untimed drilling. def not a waste.

e: and of course people should time themselves eventually, but the point of untimed practice is to see the patterns of the test so you can get faster at doing it when you actually do end up timing yourself.

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby ancienthistory » Wed Dec 27, 2017 8:40 pm

Checking in! I'm scared since it is 175+ or bust for me since my gpa is pure shit. Bye bye social life. :shock:

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby olympia » Thu Dec 28, 2017 11:57 am

Mikey wrote:practicing untimed at first is kind of what you should do..

who cares what your real score is timed if you're just starting out? you need to learn and dissect the test when you first start, and untimed practice is the way to do it. blind review is to be done after you've already practiced a shit ton and are doing PT's, and then once you blind review after a PT you see where your weaknesses still are and you practice untimed for those specific weaknesses.

untimed drilling is definitely not a waste of time unless you're a god and are already practicing in the 170's right off the bat.. I would say most (I'd even go as far as saying all) of the people I know who got a 170+ all did untimed drilling. def not a waste.

e: and of course people should time themselves eventually, but the point of untimed practice is to see the patterns of the test so you can get faster at doing it when you actually do end up timing yourself.

This 100%. I was baffled by the user saying that untimed drilling is a waste. A statement like that screams of laziness and ignorance. Or someone who scored 175+ on their diagnostic. I’m leaning towards the former.

And, yes: I never understood the weight TLSers placed on a diagnostic score. I never took a diagnostic test because I knew I would do horribly: prior to studying for the test, I had no idea what conditional logic was nor was I familiar with doing logic games or reading for structure. A diagnostic score can only be useful and somewhat accurate if the test taker has experience with conditional logic and reading for structure.

Mikey

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Re: The Official June 2018 Study Thread

Postby Mikey » Thu Dec 28, 2017 12:18 pm

olympia wrote:
Mikey wrote:practicing untimed at first is kind of what you should do..

who cares what your real score is timed if you're just starting out? you need to learn and dissect the test when you first start, and untimed practice is the way to do it. blind review is to be done after you've already practiced a shit ton and are doing PT's, and then once you blind review after a PT you see where your weaknesses still are and you practice untimed for those specific weaknesses.

untimed drilling is definitely not a waste of time unless you're a god and are already practicing in the 170's right off the bat.. I would say most (I'd even go as far as saying all) of the people I know who got a 170+ all did untimed drilling. def not a waste.

e: and of course people should time themselves eventually, but the point of untimed practice is to see the patterns of the test so you can get faster at doing it when you actually do end up timing yourself.

This 100%. I was baffled by the user saying that untimed drilling is a waste. A statement like that screams of laziness and ignorance. Or someone who scored 175+ on their diagnostic. I’m leaning towards the former.

And, yes: I never understood the weight TLSers placed on a diagnostic score. I never took a diagnostic test because I knew I would do horribly: prior to studying for the test, I had no idea what conditional logic was nor was I familiar with doing logic games or reading for structure. A diagnostic score can only be useful and somewhat accurate if the test taker has experience with conditional logic and reading for structure.

yeah, diagnostics for most people are a waste of a PT and waste of time, imo. for some it is helpful though. I knew someone last year who scored a 164 on their diagnostic and had trouble mostly with LG. and guess what he did :mrgreen: :mrgreen: untimed drilling for LG :mrgreen: :mrgreen: haha he got a mid 170's score and ended up with a full tuition ride in the T13.

I know his exp is just an anecdote, along with everyone else I know, but I know.. A LOT of people who have taken this test, and not one of them didn't do drilling.. haha

for the most part though, for most people, a diagnostic literally just says "HEY YOU NEED TO STUDY" which you already freakin knew.

but idk, everyone is different I guess? there's def a select few who truly don't need to drill as hard and only take PTs and BR because they're already decent at the test right off the bat. and to those individuals, I kneel and give them my first born.



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