Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Praxity
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Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:39 pm

Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Postby Praxity » Wed Sep 06, 2017 9:54 am

Hey TLS Fam,

Can someone share their approach to most strongly supported LR questions? I am following 7sage lessons, currently coming off of main point questions. 7sage states that the conclusion is essentially relocated to the answer choice area and we need to sniff it out.

I'm having some trouble on the harder difficulty MSS questions and just want to have a bit more of structured approach to these questions.

Thanks!

Praxity
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:39 pm

Re: Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Postby Praxity » Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:18 pm

Praxity wrote:Hey TLS Fam,

Can someone share their approach to most strongly supported LR questions? I am following 7sage lessons, currently coming off of main point questions. 7sage states that the conclusion is essentially relocated to the answer choice area and we need to sniff it out.

I'm having some trouble on the harder difficulty MSS questions and just want to have a bit more of structured approach to these questions.

Thanks!


Maybe this post is confusing. Basically:

How do you approach MSS questions?

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MercW07
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Re: Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Postby MercW07 » Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:50 pm

In my head I say "therefore" before I read every AC (after reading the stim of course). Id say about 95% of the time this approach highlights 4 ACs as being clearly unsupported, and one as being supported. Its super easy and quite effective for me at least.

Edit: You can use any conclusion indicator you like, I just prefer therefore

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Platopus
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Re: Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Postby Platopus » Thu Sep 07, 2017 8:36 pm

MercW07 wrote:In my head I say "therefore" before I read every AC (after reading the stim of course). Id say about 95% of the time this approach highlights 4 ACs as being clearly unsupported, and one as being supported. Its super easy and quite effective for me at least.

Edit: You can use any conclusion indicator you like, I just prefer therefore


Be careful with "therefore", though. "Therefore" implies logical certainty. But as a mental trick, I would agree that it can work pretty well to approach them this way.

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Mikey
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Re: Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Postby Mikey » Thu Sep 07, 2017 9:24 pm

MSS answers can be like a conclusion that connects things together, as mentioned above.

But I'd just add that keeping in mind the fact that the right answer could be some random BS line in the middle of the stimulus. It's definitely supported, it's right in the stimulus, they just chose to ignore the other parts and give you a subtle line as the right AC instead.

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twiix
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Re: Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Postby twiix » Fri Sep 08, 2017 7:59 am

Mikey wrote:MSS answers can be like a conclusion that connects things together, as mentioned above.

But I'd just add that keeping in mind the fact that the right answer could be some random BS line in the middle of the stimulus. It's definitely supported, it's right in the stimulus, they just chose to ignore the other parts and give you a subtle line as the right AC instead.


This is a common trend with more difficult MSS questions. There will be a trap answer choice that will (likely) match your prephrase pretty closely, but will either be factually inaccurate or have some other flaw, whereas the correct answer will be a very irrelevant and minor reach, from a single line in the stimulus.

jsulli24
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Re: Consistent Approach to MSS Questions?

Postby jsulli24 » Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:42 am

Try asking yourself upon reading a specific answer choice if you can prove it.

"Can I prove this statement?"

I initially didn't like this approach because it usually required me to refer back to the stimulus to see if I could prove an answer choice. I thought I was wasting time because of this, but I've found that returning back to the stimulus is imperative for my success with these question types, and it's surprisingly faster then just trying to keep the evidence in my head. Try it out. I think it'll be a nice way to reduce silly mistakes during an anxiety-inducing test because anyone that is remotely literate, can prove a statement given a few previously stated sentences of support, and that's essentially how this question type is constructed.

(For the sake of my argument, let's assume that tasks that can be performed by literate people can be performed during anxiety-causing situations with little to no mistakes ;)




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