The Official September 2017 Study Group

Prepare for the LSAT or discuss it with others in this forum.

Are you ready for tomorrow?!?!?!

FUCK YES
20
43%
Yeah, kind of
8
17%
Ehh, hoping for the best
7
15%
Not prepared but screw it
3
6%
HAHAHA I'M NOT EVEN TAKING THE LSAT, SUCKS FOR YOU GUYS
9
19%
 
Total votes: 47

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:07 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:Whoever wrote Berk's PS advice absolutely slayed it:

[+] Spoiler
“I felt the cold, sharp edge of a knife at my neck.” “ ‘You rich Americans are all alike,’ she screamed.” “I’ve never been so scared in my life.” “The child’s belly was swollen and scabbed.” You get the picture. Starting the essay with a dramatic, unexplained sentence designed to grab the startled reader’s attention. (In fact, what it does to the reader is produce a dismayed feeling of, “Oh no, not another one of these.”). Continuing this dramatic episode for a short paragraph without tipping off its relevance to the application. Beginning the next paragraph by switching to expository style and informing us of what you were doing in this dire situation and how it was part of the background that makes you a special applicant to law school. Developing why you are so special in the rest of the statement. Then concluding with a touching statement returning to the opening gambit, about how now, after law school, you can really help that little girl in rags.

It is very clear that many applicants have been coached by someone that this is how to write a compelling personal statement. This format is transparently manipulative, formulaic, and coached. Except for the occasional novelist we admit, none of our students or graduates is going to write in this style again; none, thank goodness, is going to begin a brief with, “He stood frozen in fear as the gunman appeared out of the darkness.” So, this artifice is irrelevant to law and counter-productive: Once it ceases to surprise – and it did so more than 10 years ago – it just becomes a cliché…. Not only using clichés, but also having been coached ought to, in an ideal world, discount an application. Needless to say, however, I did not hold these statements against the writers. Often the bulk of the statement does report on impressive activities that are relevant to admission. But it is transparent when essay formulas have been coached, and we (should) strongly advise applicants to write in their own voice and style and without trying to dramatize what they have to say in order to attract our attention.”

HAIL STANNYBERK. The Bay is the way!

My alma mater makin' me proud. 8)

So many PS's really do follow this formula though. Happy to read this because I thought they often sound a bit canned.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:10 pm

Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:Whoever wrote Berk's PS advice absolutely slayed it:

[+] Spoiler
“I felt the cold, sharp edge of a knife at my neck.” “ ‘You rich Americans are all alike,’ she screamed.” “I’ve never been so scared in my life.” “The child’s belly was swollen and scabbed.” You get the picture. Starting the essay with a dramatic, unexplained sentence designed to grab the startled reader’s attention. (In fact, what it does to the reader is produce a dismayed feeling of, “Oh no, not another one of these.”). Continuing this dramatic episode for a short paragraph without tipping off its relevance to the application. Beginning the next paragraph by switching to expository style and informing us of what you were doing in this dire situation and how it was part of the background that makes you a special applicant to law school. Developing why you are so special in the rest of the statement. Then concluding with a touching statement returning to the opening gambit, about how now, after law school, you can really help that little girl in rags.

It is very clear that many applicants have been coached by someone that this is how to write a compelling personal statement. This format is transparently manipulative, formulaic, and coached. Except for the occasional novelist we admit, none of our students or graduates is going to write in this style again; none, thank goodness, is going to begin a brief with, “He stood frozen in fear as the gunman appeared out of the darkness.” So, this artifice is irrelevant to law and counter-productive: Once it ceases to surprise – and it did so more than 10 years ago – it just becomes a cliché…. Not only using clichés, but also having been coached ought to, in an ideal world, discount an application. Needless to say, however, I did not hold these statements against the writers. Often the bulk of the statement does report on impressive activities that are relevant to admission. But it is transparent when essay formulas have been coached, and we (should) strongly advise applicants to write in their own voice and style and without trying to dramatize what they have to say in order to attract our attention.”

HAIL STANNYBERK. The Bay is the way!

My alma mater makin' me proud. 8)

So many PS's really do follow this formula though. Happy to read this because I thought they often sound a bit canned.

They really do. I'd like to think a good writer can grab the reader's attention and form an interesting narrative without resorting to things like that. I may just be biased though, because I don't have anything dramatic to write about, lol.

User avatar
dm1683

Silver
Posts: 744
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2016 9:57 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby dm1683 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:15 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:Whoever wrote Berk's PS advice absolutely slayed it:

[+] Spoiler
“I felt the cold, sharp edge of a knife at my neck.” “ ‘You rich Americans are all alike,’ she screamed.” “I’ve never been so scared in my life.” “The child’s belly was swollen and scabbed.” You get the picture. Starting the essay with a dramatic, unexplained sentence designed to grab the startled reader’s attention. (In fact, what it does to the reader is produce a dismayed feeling of, “Oh no, not another one of these.”). Continuing this dramatic episode for a short paragraph without tipping off its relevance to the application. Beginning the next paragraph by switching to expository style and informing us of what you were doing in this dire situation and how it was part of the background that makes you a special applicant to law school. Developing why you are so special in the rest of the statement. Then concluding with a touching statement returning to the opening gambit, about how now, after law school, you can really help that little girl in rags.

It is very clear that many applicants have been coached by someone that this is how to write a compelling personal statement. This format is transparently manipulative, formulaic, and coached. Except for the occasional novelist we admit, none of our students or graduates is going to write in this style again; none, thank goodness, is going to begin a brief with, “He stood frozen in fear as the gunman appeared out of the darkness.” So, this artifice is irrelevant to law and counter-productive: Once it ceases to surprise – and it did so more than 10 years ago – it just becomes a cliché…. Not only using clichés, but also having been coached ought to, in an ideal world, discount an application. Needless to say, however, I did not hold these statements against the writers. Often the bulk of the statement does report on impressive activities that are relevant to admission. But it is transparent when essay formulas have been coached, and we (should) strongly advise applicants to write in their own voice and style and without trying to dramatize what they have to say in order to attract our attention.”

HAIL STANNYBERK. The Bay is the way!

My alma mater makin' me proud. 8)

So many PS's really do follow this formula though. Happy to read this because I thought they often sound a bit canned.

They really do. I'd like to think a good writer can grab the reader's attention and form an interesting narrative without resorting to things like that. I may just be biased though, because I don't have anything dramatic to write about, lol.

Yep yep yep...many of the PS on here sound like they're ripped out of dime store novels, quite frankly. I mean, if you're a rape survivor or something you cant just treat it like it's nbd, but don't start with like "as he ripped my bra off I felt my innocence being torn away like [insert simile of your choice]."

I disagree that being coached ought to discount an application though. Would it be better if you had the innate writing abilities of Toni Morrison? Yeah, but the fact that you're going to that length (getting coached) to perfect your application deserves some credit IMO.

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:16 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:Whoever wrote Berk's PS advice absolutely slayed it:

[+] Spoiler
“I felt the cold, sharp edge of a knife at my neck.” “ ‘You rich Americans are all alike,’ she screamed.” “I’ve never been so scared in my life.” “The child’s belly was swollen and scabbed.” You get the picture. Starting the essay with a dramatic, unexplained sentence designed to grab the startled reader’s attention. (In fact, what it does to the reader is produce a dismayed feeling of, “Oh no, not another one of these.”). Continuing this dramatic episode for a short paragraph without tipping off its relevance to the application. Beginning the next paragraph by switching to expository style and informing us of what you were doing in this dire situation and how it was part of the background that makes you a special applicant to law school. Developing why you are so special in the rest of the statement. Then concluding with a touching statement returning to the opening gambit, about how now, after law school, you can really help that little girl in rags.

It is very clear that many applicants have been coached by someone that this is how to write a compelling personal statement. This format is transparently manipulative, formulaic, and coached. Except for the occasional novelist we admit, none of our students or graduates is going to write in this style again; none, thank goodness, is going to begin a brief with, “He stood frozen in fear as the gunman appeared out of the darkness.” So, this artifice is irrelevant to law and counter-productive: Once it ceases to surprise – and it did so more than 10 years ago – it just becomes a cliché…. Not only using clichés, but also having been coached ought to, in an ideal world, discount an application. Needless to say, however, I did not hold these statements against the writers. Often the bulk of the statement does report on impressive activities that are relevant to admission. But it is transparent when essay formulas have been coached, and we (should) strongly advise applicants to write in their own voice and style and without trying to dramatize what they have to say in order to attract our attention.”

HAIL STANNYBERK. The Bay is the way!

My alma mater makin' me proud. 8)

So many PS's really do follow this formula though. Happy to read this because I thought they often sound a bit canned.

They really do. I'd like to think a good writer can grab the reader's attention and form an interesting narrative without resorting to things like that. I may just be biased though, because I don't have anything dramatic to write about, lol.

Yes.
And ugh same.

People go and dramatize really small things too, I guess to "grab attention". I dunno like what is the point? It's great to have a creative slant and be able to write fluidly, but, like, this is a law school application.

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:20 pm

dm1683 wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:Whoever wrote Berk's PS advice absolutely slayed it:

[+] Spoiler
“I felt the cold, sharp edge of a knife at my neck.” “ ‘You rich Americans are all alike,’ she screamed.” “I’ve never been so scared in my life.” “The child’s belly was swollen and scabbed.” You get the picture. Starting the essay with a dramatic, unexplained sentence designed to grab the startled reader’s attention. (In fact, what it does to the reader is produce a dismayed feeling of, “Oh no, not another one of these.”). Continuing this dramatic episode for a short paragraph without tipping off its relevance to the application. Beginning the next paragraph by switching to expository style and informing us of what you were doing in this dire situation and how it was part of the background that makes you a special applicant to law school. Developing why you are so special in the rest of the statement. Then concluding with a touching statement returning to the opening gambit, about how now, after law school, you can really help that little girl in rags.

It is very clear that many applicants have been coached by someone that this is how to write a compelling personal statement. This format is transparently manipulative, formulaic, and coached. Except for the occasional novelist we admit, none of our students or graduates is going to write in this style again; none, thank goodness, is going to begin a brief with, “He stood frozen in fear as the gunman appeared out of the darkness.” So, this artifice is irrelevant to law and counter-productive: Once it ceases to surprise – and it did so more than 10 years ago – it just becomes a cliché…. Not only using clichés, but also having been coached ought to, in an ideal world, discount an application. Needless to say, however, I did not hold these statements against the writers. Often the bulk of the statement does report on impressive activities that are relevant to admission. But it is transparent when essay formulas have been coached, and we (should) strongly advise applicants to write in their own voice and style and without trying to dramatize what they have to say in order to attract our attention.”

HAIL STANNYBERK. The Bay is the way!

My alma mater makin' me proud. 8)

So many PS's really do follow this formula though. Happy to read this because I thought they often sound a bit canned.

They really do. I'd like to think a good writer can grab the reader's attention and form an interesting narrative without resorting to things like that. I may just be biased though, because I don't have anything dramatic to write about, lol.

Yep yep yep...many of the PS on here sound like they're ripped out of dime store novels, quite frankly. I mean, if you're a rape survivor or something you cant just treat it like it's nbd, but don't start with like "as he ripped my bra off I felt my innocence being torn away like [insert simile of your choice]."

I disagree that being coached ought to discount an application though. Would it be better if you had the innate writing abilities of Toni Morrison? Yeah, but the fact that you're going to that length (getting coached) to perfect your application deserves some credit IMO.

I think getting feedback and guidance is fine and commendable. I think what Berk is referring to is getting told how to formulate it, what to write about, etc. to the extent that it no longer sounds genuine.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:25 pm

Alexandros wrote:
dm1683 wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:Whoever wrote Berk's PS advice absolutely slayed it:

[+] Spoiler
“I felt the cold, sharp edge of a knife at my neck.” “ ‘You rich Americans are all alike,’ she screamed.” “I’ve never been so scared in my life.” “The child’s belly was swollen and scabbed.” You get the picture. Starting the essay with a dramatic, unexplained sentence designed to grab the startled reader’s attention. (In fact, what it does to the reader is produce a dismayed feeling of, “Oh no, not another one of these.”). Continuing this dramatic episode for a short paragraph without tipping off its relevance to the application. Beginning the next paragraph by switching to expository style and informing us of what you were doing in this dire situation and how it was part of the background that makes you a special applicant to law school. Developing why you are so special in the rest of the statement. Then concluding with a touching statement returning to the opening gambit, about how now, after law school, you can really help that little girl in rags.

It is very clear that many applicants have been coached by someone that this is how to write a compelling personal statement. This format is transparently manipulative, formulaic, and coached. Except for the occasional novelist we admit, none of our students or graduates is going to write in this style again; none, thank goodness, is going to begin a brief with, “He stood frozen in fear as the gunman appeared out of the darkness.” So, this artifice is irrelevant to law and counter-productive: Once it ceases to surprise – and it did so more than 10 years ago – it just becomes a cliché…. Not only using clichés, but also having been coached ought to, in an ideal world, discount an application. Needless to say, however, I did not hold these statements against the writers. Often the bulk of the statement does report on impressive activities that are relevant to admission. But it is transparent when essay formulas have been coached, and we (should) strongly advise applicants to write in their own voice and style and without trying to dramatize what they have to say in order to attract our attention.”

HAIL STANNYBERK. The Bay is the way!

My alma mater makin' me proud. 8)

So many PS's really do follow this formula though. Happy to read this because I thought they often sound a bit canned.

They really do. I'd like to think a good writer can grab the reader's attention and form an interesting narrative without resorting to things like that. I may just be biased though, because I don't have anything dramatic to write about, lol.

Yep yep yep...many of the PS on here sound like they're ripped out of dime store novels, quite frankly. I mean, if you're a rape survivor or something you cant just treat it like it's nbd, but don't start with like "as he ripped my bra off I felt my innocence being torn away like [insert simile of your choice]."

I disagree that being coached ought to discount an application though. Would it be better if you had the innate writing abilities of Toni Morrison? Yeah, but the fact that you're going to that length (getting coached) to perfect your application deserves some credit IMO.

I think getting feedback and guidance is fine and commendable. I think what Berk is referring to is getting told how to formulate it, what to write about, etc. to the extent that it no longer sounds genuine.

"We (should) strongly advise applicants to write in their own voice and style..."

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:20 pm


User avatar
presidentspivey

Bronze
Posts: 177
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:34 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby presidentspivey » Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:24 pm

Alexandros wrote:http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/inside-minds-rubenstein-scholars-featuring-class-2017
Clerkship numbers. :shock:

To me this strengthens the feeling I've always had that Ruby>YS.

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:26 pm

presidentspivey wrote:
Alexandros wrote:http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/inside-minds-rubenstein-scholars-featuring-class-2017
Clerkship numbers. :shock:

To me this strengthens the feeling I've always had that Ruby>YS.

That clerkship rate is ... just under twice Yale's. Damn.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:30 pm

Alexandros wrote:
presidentspivey wrote:
Alexandros wrote:http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/inside-minds-rubenstein-scholars-featuring-class-2017
Clerkship numbers. :shock:

To me this strengthens the feeling I've always had that Ruby>YS.

That clerkship rate is ... just under twice Yale's. Damn.

Yup. As someone said in other thread, getting the Ruby is winning LS. You just can't say no to that.

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:40 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
presidentspivey wrote:
Alexandros wrote:http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/inside-minds-rubenstein-scholars-featuring-class-2017
Clerkship numbers. :shock:

To me this strengthens the feeling I've always had that Ruby>YS.

That clerkship rate is ... just under twice Yale's. Damn.

Yup. As someone said in other thread, getting the Ruby is winning LS. You just can't say no to that.

I'd love to see numbers for the Hamilton.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:49 pm

Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
presidentspivey wrote:
Alexandros wrote:http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/inside-minds-rubenstein-scholars-featuring-class-2017
Clerkship numbers. :shock:

To me this strengthens the feeling I've always had that Ruby>YS.

That clerkship rate is ... just under twice Yale's. Damn.

Yup. As someone said in other thread, getting the Ruby is winning LS. You just can't say no to that.

I'd love to see numbers for the Hamilton.

Yeah, it'd be interesting to see what the clerkship numbers are like, given Columbia's weakness in the area. Regardless, every day that goes by I'm convinced more and more that $$$ > everything. Use the HYS acceptances as leverage for more $$ and to tell your friends you got in, then take the fucking $, pursue whatever career you want, and be happy. It's so clear to me now.

User avatar
presidentspivey

Bronze
Posts: 177
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:34 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby presidentspivey » Fri Apr 28, 2017 8:57 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
presidentspivey wrote:
Alexandros wrote:http://www.law.uchicago.edu/news/inside-minds-rubenstein-scholars-featuring-class-2017
Clerkship numbers. :shock:

To me this strengthens the feeling I've always had that Ruby>YS.

That clerkship rate is ... just under twice Yale's. Damn.

Yup. As someone said in other thread, getting the Ruby is winning LS. You just can't say no to that.

I'd love to see numbers for the Hamilton.

Yeah, it'd be interesting to see what the clerkship numbers are like, given Columbia's weakness in the area. Regardless, every day that goes by I'm convinced more and more that $$$ > everything. Use the HYS acceptances as leverage for more $$ and to tell your friends you got in, then take the fucking $, pursue whatever career you want, and be happy. It's so clear to me now.

I think plenty of people just can't imagine saying no to Harvard Law. That gets reinforced by parents, undergrad professors, etc.

User avatar
presidentspivey

Bronze
Posts: 177
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:34 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby presidentspivey » Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:00 pm

They're making the wrong decision obviously. But I totally see why it happens.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:10 pm

presidentspivey wrote:They're making the wrong decision obviously. But I totally see why it happens.

I get why it happens as well. If I was ever lucky enough to get a Stanny or Yale acceptance, I'd agonise over the decision for a long time. I imagine I'd try to manipulate the calculus anyway I could to try to justify attending one of them, lol. The fact is though, as someone who is not exceptionally wealthy and who won't get money from family, it's unlikely that I could justify it. Oh boy, would I ever try though.

User avatar
presidentspivey

Bronze
Posts: 177
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:34 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby presidentspivey » Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:13 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
presidentspivey wrote:They're making the wrong decision obviously. But I totally see why it happens.

I get why it happens as well. If I was ever lucky enough to get a Stanny or Yale acceptance, I'd agonise over the decision for a long time. I imagine I'd try to manipulate the calculus anyway I could to try to justify attending one of them, lol. The fact is though, as someone who is not exceptionally wealthy and who won't get money from family, it's unlikely that I could justify it. Oh boy, would I ever try though.

Can't put a price on that amazing facebook flex post, though.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:17 pm

presidentspivey wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
presidentspivey wrote:They're making the wrong decision obviously. But I totally see why it happens.

I get why it happens as well. If I was ever lucky enough to get a Stanny or Yale acceptance, I'd agonise over the decision for a long time. I imagine I'd try to manipulate the calculus anyway I could to try to justify attending one of them, lol. The fact is though, as someone who is not exceptionally wealthy and who won't get money from family, it's unlikely that I could justify it. Oh boy, would I ever try though.

Can't put a price on that amazing facebook flex post, though.

I mean, you can flex on the acceptance without actually going. :lol:

ETA: Is that the correct expression, "flex on"? :oops:

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:56 pm

I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

User avatar
presidentspivey

Bronze
Posts: 177
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:34 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby presidentspivey » Fri Apr 28, 2017 9:57 pm

Alexandros wrote:I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

That's true.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:01 pm

Alexandros wrote:I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

Yeah, of course. I was just more speaking from my perspective as someone who probably wouldn't get much financial aid or help from parents. That being said, if my parents were willing to help with COL, then the situation would be completely different, and YS would be much more viable and sexy. Or to put it simply, if debt < 100k, I'd be for it.

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:22 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

Yeah, of course. I was just more speaking from my perspective as someone who probably wouldn't get much financial aid or help from parents. That being said, if my parents were willing to help with COL, then the situation would be completely different, and YS would be much more viable and sexy. Or to put it simply, if debt < 100k, I'd be for it.

Yeah the finaid calculations can definitely screw people over. Of course don't know your situation but I've heard Y is pretty good with keeping debt at the base-loan level. 100k limit would be tricky though.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:28 pm

Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

Yeah, of course. I was just more speaking from my perspective as someone who probably wouldn't get much financial aid or help from parents. That being said, if my parents were willing to help with COL, then the situation would be completely different, and YS would be much more viable and sexy. Or to put it simply, if debt < 100k, I'd be for it.

Yeah the finaid calculations can definitely screw people over. Of course don't know your situation but I've heard Y is pretty good with keeping debt at the base-loan level. 100k limit would be tricky though.

Yeah, from what I've seen YS are both quite generous. I don't want to say 100k is a hard limit, it's more just what I'd feel comfortable with because of where I could get that much money from. After that it would become much more of a debate.

User avatar
presidentspivey

Bronze
Posts: 177
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 3:34 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby presidentspivey » Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:31 pm

oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

Yeah, of course. I was just more speaking from my perspective as someone who probably wouldn't get much financial aid or help from parents. That being said, if my parents were willing to help with COL, then the situation would be completely different, and YS would be much more viable and sexy. Or to put it simply, if debt < 100k, I'd be for it.

Yeah the finaid calculations can definitely screw people over. Of course don't know your situation but I've heard Y is pretty good with keeping debt at the base-loan level. 100k limit would be tricky though.

Yeah, from what I've seen YS are both quite generous. I don't want to say 100k is a hard limit, it's more just what I'd feel comfortable with because of where I could get that much money from. After that it would become much more of a debate.

Depends on goals too. If you're really passionate about the possibility of academia Y might be worth it. Or you're trying to be president lol.

Alexandros

Platinum
Posts: 6478
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2016 4:46 am

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby Alexandros » Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:41 pm

presidentspivey wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

Yeah, of course. I was just more speaking from my perspective as someone who probably wouldn't get much financial aid or help from parents. That being said, if my parents were willing to help with COL, then the situation would be completely different, and YS would be much more viable and sexy. Or to put it simply, if debt < 100k, I'd be for it.

Yeah the finaid calculations can definitely screw people over. Of course don't know your situation but I've heard Y is pretty good with keeping debt at the base-loan level. 100k limit would be tricky though.

Yeah, from what I've seen YS are both quite generous. I don't want to say 100k is a hard limit, it's more just what I'd feel comfortable with because of where I could get that much money from. After that it would become much more of a debate.

Depends on goals too. If you're really passionate about the possibility of academia Y might be worth it. Or you're trying to be president lol.

Yeah, totally agree. Like I feel like I'd be willing to handle a few years of having to pay off debt if I felt like it would substantially increase my chances of being where I want in ten or fifteen years. But if your goals are generic BL or something, def take the money.

User avatar
oopsu812

Silver
Posts: 881
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 pm

Re: The Official September 2017 Study Group

Postby oopsu812 » Fri Apr 28, 2017 10:44 pm

Alexandros wrote:
presidentspivey wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:
oopsu812 wrote:
Alexandros wrote:I think it depends on the individual/situation/goals, tbh. YS (especially Y) can be quite generous with need-based aid.

Yeah, of course. I was just more speaking from my perspective as someone who probably wouldn't get much financial aid or help from parents. That being said, if my parents were willing to help with COL, then the situation would be completely different, and YS would be much more viable and sexy. Or to put it simply, if debt < 100k, I'd be for it.

Yeah the finaid calculations can definitely screw people over. Of course don't know your situation but I've heard Y is pretty good with keeping debt at the base-loan level. 100k limit would be tricky though.

Yeah, from what I've seen YS are both quite generous. I don't want to say 100k is a hard limit, it's more just what I'd feel comfortable with because of where I could get that much money from. After that it would become much more of a debate.

Depends on goals too. If you're really passionate about the possibility of academia Y might be worth it. Or you're trying to be president lol.

Yeah, totally agree. Like I feel like I'd be willing to handle a few years of having to pay off debt if I felt like it would substantially increase my chances of being where I want in ten or fifteen years. But if your goals are generic BL or something, def take the money.

Decisions would be easier if we weren't trying to be unicorns, eh? :mrgreen:



Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum?

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 16 guests