Prepping for June test, should I quit my job to maximize studying time?

Prepare for the LSAT or discuss it with others in this forum.
gmerch15

New
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 1:48 am

Prepping for June test, should I quit my job to maximize studying time?

Postby gmerch15 » Tue Feb 28, 2017 9:32 pm

Right out of college I began working for Oracle doing software sales, fast forward to now I'm 24 and have been here a little over 1.5 years. By living at home the entire time I've been able to save a very solid amount and have no expenses such as rent, groceries, etc.

The job itself is miserable but isn't overly stressful, I'm able to put in about 2 hours of studying every night after working 7am-4pm and about 10 hours+ over the weekend. But since I have no financial obligations tying me to work I wonder if it's worth it to quit and fully take the next 3 months to study my ass off and fully maximize preparation. I'm fairly self-motivated so I think I would be able to hit the books pretty aggressively if I were to quit. My bachelors is in History (GPA is about 3.3) with minimal softs and I'm looking to get into a top 40 school, so I'm aiming for a 165+ to get me over the 75th percentile mark.

Does it make sense to quit in order to fully maximize studying and risk getting an unsatisfactory score and being jobless come July?

If I do quit, is there anything I can do to supplement studying that could make me a more attractive candidate? Volunteering perhaps?

Also, I'm interested in Tech/IP Law, so if I do achieve a satisfactory score would it strengthen my application to be currently employed by a tech company during the admissions process?

Any advice would be much appreciated!

User avatar
Platopus

Silver
Posts: 1482
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2017 11:20 pm

Re: Prepping for June test, should I quit my job to maximize studying time?

Postby Platopus » Tue Feb 28, 2017 10:51 pm

gmerch15 wrote:Right out of college I began working for Oracle doing software sales, fast forward to now I'm 24 and have been here a little over 1.5 years. By living at home the entire time I've been able to save a very solid amount and have no expenses such as rent, groceries, etc.

The job itself is miserable but isn't overly stressful, I'm able to put in about 2 hours of studying every night after working 7am-4pm and about 10 hours+ over the weekend. But since I have no financial obligations tying me to work I wonder if it's worth it to quit and fully take the next 3 months to study my ass off and fully maximize preparation. I'm fairly self-motivated so I think I would be able to hit the books pretty aggressively if I were to quit. My bachelors is in History (GPA is about 3.3) with minimal softs and I'm looking to get into a top 40 school, so I'm aiming for a 165+ to get me over the 75th percentile mark.

Does it make sense to quit in order to fully maximize studying and risk getting an unsatisfactory score and being jobless come July?

If I do quit, is there anything I can do to supplement studying that could make me a more attractive candidate? Volunteering perhaps?

Also, I'm interested in Tech/IP Law, so if I do achieve a satisfactory score would it strengthen my application to be currently employed by a tech company during the admissions process?

Any advice would be much appreciated!


It's hard to say without knowing what your diagnostic score is. For example, if you scored a 155 on your diagnostic and you are only looking for a 165+ come test day I wouldn't quit. Jumping from the low to mid 150 into the mid 160's can be achieved by your current study schedule. Also, how long have you currently been studying, and what kind of improvement have you noticed? What are your weakest sections? Significant gains, especially in Logic Games can be achieved by almost anybody, which is easily 5+ points in your scaled score.

I would first try studying more on your current work schedule. Perhaps you can put in an additional hour or two every night, or at the least, every other night. If you feel that you are falling behind or not making the progress you'd like to see, you can always post-pone to September.

If you're dead set on quitting, then you have the right frame of mind, in that you need to be doing something else non-LSAT related, such a volunteering. Not only will that help soften the blow of a 3 month gap on your resume, but it will keep you sane. Generally speaking, working in a sales position for a tech company will give you no appreciably boost in admissions, and probably no boost come OCI either. Those with Phd's in engineering or computer science see the benefits for IP/Tech law.

It sounds like the job is miserable, which I can relate to, but I think you should stick it out and save money.

gmerch15

New
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 1:48 am

Re: Prepping for June test, should I quit my job to maximize studying time?

Postby gmerch15 » Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:06 pm

On my initial diagnostic I scored a 147. I haven't taken a full PT since, but on individual LR PT sections I've so far gone from averaging about -7 to more like -4 and also I've improved on LR so I think as of now I could potential break at least 155 pretty consistently.

I do think you're correct in that I could probable achieve my goal of 165 while working full-time, but a part of me thinks that if I had enough time I can really blow it out of the water and score in the low 170s and make me competitive for top 30 schools. That's the part of me that wants to quit.

somedeadman

Bronze
Posts: 436
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2016 5:42 pm

Re: Prepping for June test, should I quit my job to maximize studying time?

Postby somedeadman » Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:51 pm

Do what makes you happy/feels comfortable. I did quit my job to study full-time, and was able to secure another job fairly quickly after the test.

Edit - a higher LSAT score means more than an employment gap, so I'm in the "go for it and quit" camp. Plenty of people will disagree with me though

User avatar
Platopus

Silver
Posts: 1482
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2017 11:20 pm

Re: Prepping for June test, should I quit my job to maximize studying time?

Postby Platopus » Wed Mar 01, 2017 1:11 am

gmerch15 wrote:On my initial diagnostic I scored a 147. I haven't taken a full PT since, but on individual LR PT sections I've so far gone from averaging about -7 to more like -4 and also I've improved on LR so I think as of now I could potential break at least 155 pretty consistently.

I do think you're correct in that I could probable achieve my goal of 165 while working full-time, but a part of me thinks that if I had enough time I can really blow it out of the water and score in the low 170s and make me competitive for top 30 schools. That's the part of me that wants to quit.


If you're already at the point where you can go -4 per section on LR TIMED, you're really sitting in a good place. I'm not sure where you're at with LG, but its reasonable to assume that you can go -0/-1 come test day. Assuming you can make slow but steady gains with LR, you can easily hit that 165+. I think a 165 might be aiming too low. A 170+ puts you in contention at the half of the T-14 (thinking Northwestern here). Definitely shoot for a 170+.

With that said, I think my earlier advice still holds. I would continue to study for a couple more weeks, and see if you are able to make more time. Schedule a PT for a weekend coming up and see how you do, and then re-evaluate. If you surprise yourself and score in the mid-upper 160's quitting would be more justified, since much more time is needed to crack 170 than 165. Honestly, you probably don't have much to lose by quitting, and you certainly may see the score increase you want, but you're going to feel stupid if you quit, study your ass off and score a 163.

Whamper

New
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 5:20 pm

Re: Prepping for June test, should I quit my job to maximize studying time?

Postby Whamper » Wed Mar 01, 2017 12:08 pm

You actually have options, it could be much worse. I graduated last summer and have been struggling to find a job since (and I graduated from a really good school with a decent subject). Although to be fair, I had a major health complication which threw me off until around November and didn't really start searching until then. Things are picking up now, getting lots of interviews, but that gap is going to look really nasty for me and I have only just started studying for the LSAT. I can't afford to be out of work for a year, so I really have no option but to work (soon hopefully) and study LSAT at the same time.

Since you already have a significant amount of post graduation working experience, I would say you're in a very comfortable position to leave and just study LSAT. Make sure you do some volunteering on the side: will look good when you need new employment, looks good to law schools, will keep you sane with all that studying! Good luck.



Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum�

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests