Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

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SunDevil14

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Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Sun Jan 22, 2017 2:01 am

Long story short, I did horrible on my retake. A combination of burnout, stress, test anxiety, bad luck, etc. etc. lead to a performance of 159 (160 on first attempt with little studying) whereas I was averaging in high 160's to low 170's in months leading up to the test. I decided to apply to a handful of schools, though I am not too optimistic about admissions and scholarship offers. There is a good chance I will take the test a third time. If I go that route then I will likely take the exam in September and apply early.

My problem is that I have taken nearly all of the practice tests, reviewed all logic games by type PT's 1-60, and addressed most problematic question types PT's 1-60. Additionally, I have already worked through the power-score trilogy and workbooks along with the Manhattan trilogy. I am not too sure the best way to proceed studying for a 3rd attempt, anyone with similar experience or solid recommendations please chime in.

Money is not an issue, but do want to speed needlessly. Currently I own clean copies of all LR questions by type PT 1-60 and all LG by type PT 1-60. As of now, I'd likely pick up clean copies of most if not all the PTs along with RC passages by type. If there is any company that offers PDF copies of PTs that would be ideal, though I do not know of one. I am not too sure how much I'd benefit from it since my fundamentals are pretty solid, but perhaps get a 7sage class subscription.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby somedeadman » Mon Jan 23, 2017 7:15 pm

I am currently in an extremely similiar situation. Have you taken 61-79?

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby Voyager » Mon Jan 23, 2017 7:57 pm

Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby ZVBXRPL » Tue Jan 24, 2017 12:49 am

Google LSAC India. Also MCAT reading comp is harder.

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SunDevil14

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 12:05 pm

somedeadman wrote:I am currently in an extremely similiar situation. Have you taken 61-79?


Yes I have.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby marryJLP92 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 12:08 pm

How long have you been studying overall? from start to finish?
I ask because perhaps you could re-use material that is not so fresh. It'll be a fine line between understanding the mechanisms of logic and memory...my bet is that the material is still very useful in the former.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 12:31 pm

Voyager wrote:Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.


I checked out the approach, which was similar to what I had been been doing. In the last 6 weeks or so before the test I was constantly addressing my weakest sections/question types. I improved my average from the high 160's to the low 170's with a handful of 173+ plus scores. I was studying 40 hours a week and reviewing 2 to 3 tests along with drilling.

I believe my issue was stress, burn out, and anxiety. In what way would you modify my approach?

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 12:39 pm

marryJLP92 wrote:How long have you been studying overall? from start to finish?
I ask because perhaps you could re-use material that is not so fresh. It'll be a fine line between understanding the mechanisms of logic and memory...my bet is that the material is still very useful in the former.


1 month for my first attempt (160) and 6 months for my second (159) so in total 7 months.

During my most recent attempt, I saved the more recent prep tests for last. You are likely right, after a few months I likely won't remember many if any of the specific questions. If anything, recalling certain passages or games may give me slightly inflate my score.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby marryJLP92 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 12:50 pm

Timed conditions will help you with in-test anxiety.
From experience, working 4 hours per day (not weekends) with an entire week off at the end of the month was a great balance and very manageable.
If you burn out it's a long process to rejuvenate...the old adage holds true in this regard: slow and steady wins the race!
If you were indeed PT'ing at high-160's low 170's i'd suggest rejuvenating first, followed by periodic attempts to maintain a score...in conjunction with timed test should do the trick.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby Voyager » Tue Jan 24, 2017 1:12 pm

SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.


I checked out the approach, which was similar to what I had been been doing. In the last 6 weeks or so before the test I was constantly addressing my weakest sections/question types. I improved my average from the high 160's to the low 170's with a handful of 173+ plus scores. I was studying 40 hours a week and reviewing 2 to 3 tests along with drilling.

I believe my issue was stress, burn out, and anxiety. In what way would you modify my approach?


Well... studying 40 hours a week is pretty intense.

I was working 40 hours a week and studying 20 hours a week.

Also, realize that you will likely score 5 pts less on the real thing vs. your practice test average.

I don't know how to fix anxiety outside of taking loads of practice tests.

I also don't know how you studied, exactly. You are the better judge of what you did and what to change.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 1:15 pm

marryJLP92 wrote:Timed conditions will help you with in-test anxiety.
From experience, working 4 hours per day (not weekends) with an entire week off at the end of the month was a great balance and very manageable.
If you burn out it's a long process to rejuvenate...the old adage holds true in this regard: slow and steady wins the race!
If you were indeed PT'ing at high-160's low 170's i'd suggest rejuvenating first, followed by periodic attempts to maintain a score...in conjunction with timed test should do the trick.


Timed conditions as in the normal 35 minute sections or more stringent time conditions < 35 minutes? The vast majority of my prep was timed.

How many hours did you study a week?

Currently, I have not touched the material since test day (December3rd) and will likely start studying again in a week or two. I put in 10 hours a week working for a law firm, and am currently search for another part time job in the 12-20 hour a week range. This time around, I am planning on a less aggressive study schedule 20 hours a week max with more frequent breaks of a few days up to a week or two. In the end, take the test in September or June if I feel that I am ready.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 1:17 pm

Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.


I checked out the approach, which was similar to what I had been been doing. In the last 6 weeks or so before the test I was constantly addressing my weakest sections/question types. I improved my average from the high 160's to the low 170's with a handful of 173+ plus scores. I was studying 40 hours a week and reviewing 2 to 3 tests along with drilling.

I believe my issue was stress, burn out, and anxiety. In what way would you modify my approach?


Well... studying 40 hours a week is pretty intense.

I was working 40 hours a week and studying 20 hours a week.

Also, realize that you will likely score 5 pts less on the real thing vs. your practice test average.

I don't know how to fix anxiety outside of taking loads of practice tests.

I also don't know how you studied, exactly. You are the better judge of what you did and what to change.


Thanks for the input, I will likely just focus on not burning myself out and using a more conservative study schedule. In the end, I took about 50 timed practice tests. The first attempt I did not take seriously, and ended up getting 160. I've never really had to study much or long for anything before, so hours and hours of prep was likely weighing me down during test day.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby Voyager » Tue Jan 24, 2017 1:49 pm

SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.


I checked out the approach, which was similar to what I had been been doing. In the last 6 weeks or so before the test I was constantly addressing my weakest sections/question types. I improved my average from the high 160's to the low 170's with a handful of 173+ plus scores. I was studying 40 hours a week and reviewing 2 to 3 tests along with drilling.

I believe my issue was stress, burn out, and anxiety. In what way would you modify my approach?


Well... studying 40 hours a week is pretty intense.

I was working 40 hours a week and studying 20 hours a week.

Also, realize that you will likely score 5 pts less on the real thing vs. your practice test average.

I don't know how to fix anxiety outside of taking loads of practice tests.

I also don't know how you studied, exactly. You are the better judge of what you did and what to change.


Thanks for the input, I will likely just focus on not burning myself out and using a more conservative study schedule. In the end, I took about 50 timed practice tests. The first attempt I did not take seriously, and ended up getting 160. I've never really had to study much or long for anything before, so hours and hours of prep was likely weighing me down during test day.


If it's helpful, my study experience was after 3 hours straight of LSAT I needed a break or I started to practice my mistakes, if you see what I mean.

A really intense Saturday might be 3 hours in the morning and 3 more in the evening... or maybe 1 full length test with review.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 8:17 pm

Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.


I checked out the approach, which was similar to what I had been been doing. In the last 6 weeks or so before the test I was constantly addressing my weakest sections/question types. I improved my average from the high 160's to the low 170's with a handful of 173+ plus scores. I was studying 40 hours a week and reviewing 2 to 3 tests along with drilling.

I believe my issue was stress, burn out, and anxiety. In what way would you modify my approach?


Well... studying 40 hours a week is pretty intense.

I was working 40 hours a week and studying 20 hours a week.

Also, realize that you will likely score 5 pts less on the real thing vs. your practice test average.

I don't know how to fix anxiety outside of taking loads of practice tests.

I also don't know how you studied, exactly. You are the better judge of what you did and what to change.


Thanks for the input, I will likely just focus on not burning myself out and using a more conservative study schedule. In the end, I took about 50 timed practice tests. The first attempt I did not take seriously, and ended up getting 160. I've never really had to study much or long for anything before, so hours and hours of prep was likely weighing me down during test day.


If it's helpful, my study experience was after 3 hours straight of LSAT I needed a break or I started to practice my mistakes, if you see what I mean.

A really intense Saturday might be 3 hours in the morning and 3 more in the evening... or maybe 1 full length test with review.


Thanks that helps, just a bit odd coming up with a plan for a 3rd take. It was much easier the first and second time around.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby Voyager » Tue Jan 24, 2017 8:29 pm

SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.


I checked out the approach, which was similar to what I had been been doing. In the last 6 weeks or so before the test I was constantly addressing my weakest sections/question types. I improved my average from the high 160's to the low 170's with a handful of 173+ plus scores. I was studying 40 hours a week and reviewing 2 to 3 tests along with drilling.

I believe my issue was stress, burn out, and anxiety. In what way would you modify my approach?


Well... studying 40 hours a week is pretty intense.

I was working 40 hours a week and studying 20 hours a week.

Also, realize that you will likely score 5 pts less on the real thing vs. your practice test average.

I don't know how to fix anxiety outside of taking loads of practice tests.

I also don't know how you studied, exactly. You are the better judge of what you did and what to change.


Thanks for the input, I will likely just focus on not burning myself out and using a more conservative study schedule. In the end, I took about 50 timed practice tests. The first attempt I did not take seriously, and ended up getting 160. I've never really had to study much or long for anything before, so hours and hours of prep was likely weighing me down during test day.


If it's helpful, my study experience was after 3 hours straight of LSAT I needed a break or I started to practice my mistakes, if you see what I mean.

A really intense Saturday might be 3 hours in the morning and 3 more in the evening... or maybe 1 full length test with review.


Thanks that helps, just a bit odd coming up with a plan for a 3rd take. It was much easier the first and second time around.


Yeah, man, I get it. It would be psychologically very difficult to throw myself at this LSAT prep wall for a 3rd time... part of the reason I made the point I made in that other thread regarding time and diminishing returns.

As I said in that other thread, odds are, increasing your score after all of this work and prep tests and 2 real tests is going to be a tall order. At minimum you really need to do something differently or I can assure you your score won't change.

Good luck, man. In fairness to you, there are dudes on this site that have managed a material improvement on try 3... but they tend to be a rare breed probably due to burn out and the fact that they have not demonstrated a capacity to adjust their study approach.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby somedeadman » Tue Jan 24, 2017 8:38 pm

I don't know what can be done other than to br effectively and drill weak areas. One thing I'm doing differently is 6-8 section tests.

One user (grades??) did every single prep test twice for his third take (I believe he had already done all of them at least once for his first two takes), and managed to get a 175+ score.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:05 pm

Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
Voyager wrote:Check out the recursive study plan in the attached link (about 4 posts in or so):

http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7241&p=136016#p136016

You can reuse material for drills no problem... but that isn't your issue. Your issue is you need to modify your study approach.


I checked out the approach, which was similar to what I had been been doing. In the last 6 weeks or so before the test I was constantly addressing my weakest sections/question types. I improved my average from the high 160's to the low 170's with a handful of 173+ plus scores. I was studying 40 hours a week and reviewing 2 to 3 tests along with drilling.

I believe my issue was stress, burn out, and anxiety. In what way would you modify my approach?


Well... studying 40 hours a week is pretty intense.

I was working 40 hours a week and studying 20 hours a week.

Also, realize that you will likely score 5 pts less on the real thing vs. your practice test average.

I don't know how to fix anxiety outside of taking loads of practice tests.

I also don't know how you studied, exactly. You are the better judge of what you did and what to change.


Thanks for the input, I will likely just focus on not burning myself out and using a more conservative study schedule. In the end, I took about 50 timed practice tests. The first attempt I did not take seriously, and ended up getting 160. I've never really had to study much or long for anything before, so hours and hours of prep was likely weighing me down during test day.


If it's helpful, my study experience was after 3 hours straight of LSAT I needed a break or I started to practice my mistakes, if you see what I mean.

A really intense Saturday might be 3 hours in the morning and 3 more in the evening... or maybe 1 full length test with review.


Thanks that helps, just a bit odd coming up with a plan for a 3rd take. It was much easier the first and second time around.


Yeah, man, I get it. It would be psychologically very difficult to throw myself at this LSAT prep wall for a 3rd time... part of the reason I made the point I made in that other thread regarding time and diminishing returns.

As I said in that other thread, odds are, increasing your score after all of this work and prep tests and 2 real tests is going to be a tall order. At minimum you really need to do something differently or I can assure you your score won't change.

Good luck, man. In fairness to you, there are dudes on this site that have managed a material improvement on try 3... but they tend to be a rare breed probably due to burn out and the fact that they have not demonstrated a capacity to adjust their study approach.


Yeah, I hear you thanks for all the input. Had I improved even slightly on my second attempt then I would have put this whole thing behind me. My issue is that the scores are no where near an indication of my ability. It just seems like I'd be selling out if I did not give it another go (barring an exceptionally good admissions offer). Despite the fact that they were hard fought diminishing returns I was starting to creep into the mid 170's during the final stages of my studying. So, a 159 just seems like a slap in the face especially considering a 3.80+ GPA and intensely studying logic as a philosophy major.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:17 pm

somedeadman wrote:I don't know what can be done other than to br effectively and drill weak areas. One thing I'm doing differently is 6-8 section tests.

One user (grades??) did every single prep test twice for his third take (I believe he had already done all of them at least once for his first two takes), and managed to get a 175+ score.


^ I would be in the same boat, already took every test along with 8 sections (two tests back to back). I tend to agree that once you start hitting the 170's that there is not too much to be done besides focusing on specific weakness, hence my confusion and need for advice on a 3rd take.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby somedeadman » Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:25 pm

SunDevil14 wrote:
somedeadman wrote:I don't know what can be done other than to br effectively and drill weak areas. One thing I'm doing differently is 6-8 section tests.

One user (grades??) did every single prep test twice for his third take (I believe he had already done all of them at least once for his first two takes), and managed to get a 175+ score.


^ I would be in the same boat, already took every test along with 8 sections (two tests back to back). I tend to agree that once you start hitting the 170's that there is not too much to be done besides focusing on specific weakness, hence my confusion and need for advice on a 3rd take.

Guh damn. I'm very tempted to throw in the towel, but the upside of a score increase is huge.

Anyways, I think you'll hit your mark next time. Sounds like you had a bad day.

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Re: Exhausted all fresh material, what is a good study plan for a 3rd attempt?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:29 pm

somedeadman wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:
somedeadman wrote:I don't know what can be done other than to br effectively and drill weak areas. One thing I'm doing differently is 6-8 section tests.

One user (grades??) did every single prep test twice for his third take (I believe he had already done all of them at least once for his first two takes), and managed to get a 175+ score.


^ I would be in the same boat, already took every test along with 8 sections (two tests back to back). I tend to agree that once you start hitting the 170's that there is not too much to be done besides focusing on specific weakness, hence my confusion and need for advice on a 3rd take.

Guh damn. I'm very tempted to throw in the towel, but the upside of a score increase is huge.

Anyways, I think you'll hit your mark next time. Sounds like you had a bad day.


Bad day is an understatement haha, I was tempted to cancel. Anyways you will be fine, just do not burn out.



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