Pacing on RC

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New_Spice180

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Pacing on RC

Postby New_Spice180 » Thu Nov 17, 2016 4:44 pm

Hey guys I'm finding a bit of trouble getting too finish all the questions under timed conditions. I find this section especially difficult when the last passage has large amounts of inference and strengthen/weaken questions. All you guys' vast knowledge is appreciated!

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SunDevil14

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Re: Pacing on RC

Postby SunDevil14 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:16 am

Worth noting these are my personal ideas and approach.

Don't be afraid to rely on your memory, unfortunately you do not have enough time to look back to the passage every time to check you answers. Also, some questions you may have to narrow it down to 2 answers and give it your best guess. A 50% shot is much better than using up and additional minute or two and therefore resorting to a skim read vs a thorough read of the last passage.

Generally you want to spend less time on easier passages than harder passages. Likewise more time on passages containing more questions. Personally, I see how many questions each passage has and then go from there. I do 8 question passages first, followed by 7, 6, and 5. That way if you have to resort to speed reading on the last passage, then the damage is minimized. Ideally, you want to be as thorough as time permits on each passage. I'd much rather be thorough on the first 3 and speed reading the passage with 5 questions than given less then adequate amount of time to each passage.

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Tazewell

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Re: Pacing on RC

Postby Tazewell » Fri Nov 18, 2016 9:09 am

SunDevil14 wrote:Worth noting these are my personal ideas and approach.

Don't be afraid to rely on your memory, unfortunately you do not have enough time to look back to the passage every time to check you answers. Also, some questions you may have to narrow it down to 2 answers and give it your best guess. A 50% shot is much better than using up and additional minute or two and therefore resorting to a skim read vs a thorough read of the last passage.

Generally you want to spend less time on easier passages than harder passages. Likewise more time on passages containing more questions. Personally, I see how many questions each passage has and then go from there. I do 8 question passages first, followed by 7, 6, and 5. That way if you have to resort to speed reading on the last passage, then the damage is minimized. Ideally, you want to be as thorough as time permits on each passage. I'd much rather be thorough on the first 3 and speed reading the passage with 5 questions than given less then adequate amount of time to each passage.


I agree with everything here but just wanted to expand a little more on the "don't be afraid to rely on memory".

I go into every question with the mindset to not refer back to the passage. If you read it carefully the first time through, you won't have to. So a slower, more careful read saves time in the long run. Now that's not to say that I don't ever refer back to the passage. If it provides me with a line number or asks about a specific paragraph, I quickly skim the relevant section, then answer the question. The less you have to refer back to the question, the more time you'll save.

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SunDevil14

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Re: Pacing on RC

Postby SunDevil14 » Fri Nov 18, 2016 11:48 am

Tazewell wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:Worth noting these are my personal ideas and approach.

Don't be afraid to rely on your memory, unfortunately you do not have enough time to look back to the passage every time to check you answers. Also, some questions you may have to narrow it down to 2 answers and give it your best guess. A 50% shot is much better than using up and additional minute or two and therefore resorting to a skim read vs a thorough read of the last passage.

Generally you want to spend less time on easier passages than harder passages. Likewise more time on passages containing more questions. Personally, I see how many questions each passage has and then go from there. I do 8 question passages first, followed by 7, 6, and 5. That way if you have to resort to speed reading on the last passage, then the damage is minimized. Ideally, you want to be as thorough as time permits on each passage. I'd much rather be thorough on the first 3 and speed reading the passage with 5 questions than given less then adequate amount of time to each passage.


I agree with everything here but just wanted to expand a little more on the "don't be afraid to rely on memory".

I go into every question with the mindset to not refer back to the passage. If you read it carefully the first time through, you won't have to. So a slower, more careful read saves time in the long run. Now that's not to say that I don't ever refer back to the passage. If it provides me with a line number or asks about a specific paragraph, I quickly skim the relevant section, then answer the question. The less you have to refer back to the question, the more time you'll save.


Agreed. You really should not be referring back to the passage about questions regarding most main point, viewpoints, most likely agree/degree, and inference questions if you can help it. Sometimes you do not have the luxury and have to look back, though these are the sorts of questions that will allow you to pick up the pace and thoroughly read each passage.

The type of questions that are more likely to warrant a another look at the passage are: line reference questions, paragraph reference questions, the passage states, all of these are mentioned except, and occasionally questions that compare and contrast the two comparative reading sections (at times these questions can be pretty nuanced).

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Greenteachurro

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Re: Pacing on RC

Postby Greenteachurro » Fri Nov 18, 2016 5:59 pm

New_Spice180 wrote:Hey guys I'm finding a bit of trouble getting too finish all the questions under timed conditions. I find this section especially difficult when the last passage has large amounts of inference and strengthen/weaken questions. All you guys' vast knowledge is appreciated!


Well this is a difficult section for a lot of people so don't feel bad or anything! I think the best way to do this is find a good strategy like, 7sage's , LSAT hacks, voyager, blueprint, manhattan or any really solid strategy. Go through 3 or 4 of them and get a good feeling for which feels the best for you, there's not a straight up best answer for this so you'll need to experiment a little. After that, do a bunch of RC sections with your chosen strategy and make using that strategy like second nature, once you've done that your timing will improve as you become more comfortable with your strategy. Additionally, if you're just a slow reader you might want to work on speed reading just to train your eyes to move faster a long the page. It should take like 2:30 to read a passage on average and then like 3:30 to read it super thoroughly for reference.

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New_Spice180

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Re: Pacing on RC

Postby New_Spice180 » Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:55 pm

Greenteachurro wrote:
New_Spice180 wrote:Hey guys I'm finding a bit of trouble getting too finish all the questions under timed conditions. I find this section especially difficult when the last passage has large amounts of inference and strengthen/weaken questions. All you guys' vast knowledge is appreciated!


Well this is a difficult section for a lot of people so don't feel bad or anything! I think the best way to do this is find a good strategy like, 7sage's , LSAT hacks, voyager, blueprint, manhattan or any really solid strategy. Go through 3 or 4 of them and get a good feeling for which feels the best for you, there's not a straight up best answer for this so you'll need to experiment a little. After that, do a bunch of RC sections with your chosen strategy and make using that strategy like second nature, once you've done that your timing will improve as you become more comfortable with your strategy. Additionally, if you're just a slow reader you might want to work on speed reading just to train your eyes to move faster a long the page. It should take like 2:30 to read a passage on average and then like 3:30 to read it super thoroughly for reference.



So interestingly, I've chosen to adapt more of the blueprint method but with less notation, it's actually very similar to what they suggest at 7sage. I guess my problem is retention although I've started doing some more dense articles trying to get a "snapshot" of each paragraph before moving on to the next one, and on my last practice test I was noticeably more able to refer less on text and more on memory!

Moreover on inference questions, I feel as though it's hard to not reference back to text. I noticed that I struggled between pinpointing if I should be inferring based on a particular statement which more closely references the particular idea or I should extrapolate from the total big picture from the author.

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New_Spice180

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Re: Pacing on RC

Postby New_Spice180 » Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:57 pm

Tazewell wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:Worth noting these are my personal ideas and approach.

Don't be afraid to rely on your memory, unfortunately you do not have enough time to look back to the passage every time to check you answers. Also, some questions you may have to narrow it down to 2 answers and give it your best guess. A 50% shot is much better than using up and additional minute or two and therefore resorting to a skim read vs a thorough read of the last passage.

Generally you want to spend less time on easier passages than harder passages. Likewise more time on passages containing more questions. Personally, I see how many questions each passage has and then go from there. I do 8 question passages first, followed by 7, 6, and 5. That way if you have to resort to speed reading on the last passage, then the damage is minimized. Ideally, you want to be as thorough as time permits on each passage. I'd much rather be thorough on the first 3 and speed reading the passage with 5 questions than given less then adequate amount of time to each passage.


I agree with everything here but just wanted to expand a little more on the "don't be afraid to rely on memory".

I go into every question with the mindset to not refer back to the passage. If you read it carefully the first time through, you won't have to. So a slower, more careful read saves time in the long run. Now that's not to say that I don't ever refer back to the passage. If it provides me with a line number or asks about a specific paragraph, I quickly skim the relevant section, then answer the question. The less you have to refer back to the question, the more time you'll save.


I'm the type of person that would run with this info and take my sweet time on a passage, I guess that's another problem: how does one gauge what's "too fast" for reasonable comprehension and retention. I find myself saying, "okay I really need to slow down" then I'll check my watch and realize I've spent 3 minutes on the passage alone...

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SunDevil14

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Re: Pacing on RC

Postby SunDevil14 » Sat Nov 19, 2016 5:33 pm

New_Spice180 wrote:
Tazewell wrote:
SunDevil14 wrote:Worth noting these are my personal ideas and approach.

Don't be afraid to rely on your memory, unfortunately you do not have enough time to look back to the passage every time to check you answers. Also, some questions you may have to narrow it down to 2 answers and give it your best guess. A 50% shot is much better than using up and additional minute or two and therefore resorting to a skim read vs a thorough read of the last passage.

Generally you want to spend less time on easier passages than harder passages. Likewise more time on passages containing more questions. Personally, I see how many questions each passage has and then go from there. I do 8 question passages first, followed by 7, 6, and 5. That way if you have to resort to speed reading on the last passage, then the damage is minimized. Ideally, you want to be as thorough as time permits on each passage. I'd much rather be thorough on the first 3 and speed reading the passage with 5 questions than given less then adequate amount of time to each passage.


I agree with everything here but just wanted to expand a little more on the "don't be afraid to rely on memory".

I go into every question with the mindset to not refer back to the passage. If you read it carefully the first time through, you won't have to. So a slower, more careful read saves time in the long run. Now that's not to say that I don't ever refer back to the passage. If it provides me with a line number or asks about a specific paragraph, I quickly skim the relevant section, then answer the question. The less you have to refer back to the question, the more time you'll save.


I'm the type of person that would run with this info and take my sweet time on a passage, I guess that's another problem: how does one gauge what's "too fast" for reasonable comprehension and retention. I find myself saying, "okay I really need to slow down" then I'll check my watch and realize I've spent 3 minutes on the passage alone...


3 minutes is not terrible, especially if you can quickly answer the question. Unfortunately the answer to your question not cut and dry. What is too little and to much time spent reading the passage tends to vary from person to person. Really monitor you progress and timing. Some people do well quickly reading the passage and spending the majority of the time on the questions, others do well spending a lot of time on the passage and then quickly answer the questions. Some find notating beneficial, and otherwise find it detrimental. Ultimately you need to find what works best for you, and stick to it. Even if you pick up a book like Manhattan Prep RC, the books explains several different approaches that have been successful, and leaves it up to you to choose the one that fits you best.



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