LG really good but lost other places?

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puppymeom

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LG really good but lost other places?

Postby puppymeom » Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:53 am

Hi all!

I'm taking the December LSAT and I have been studying for the past three weeks. Initial score was 158, best score thus far has been 163.

LG I usually get near perfect or perfect, but everything else is a mess. I have the PowerScore bibles and have read about 1/6 of each. I'm going to bump that up so I can finish getting through them within the next three weeks. I also take four practice tests a week.

I know studying is key, but I keep scoring around 158, except for the 163 I got this past weekend. Any advice? I'm starting to feel the pressure because I only have ten weeks left. I just don't know what a reasonable goal is at this point.

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kindofcanuck

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Re: LG really good but lost other places?

Postby kindofcanuck » Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:58 am

puppymeom wrote:Hi all!

I'm taking the December LSAT and I have been studying for the past three weeks. Initial score was 158, best score thus far has been 163.

LG I usually get near perfect or perfect, but everything else is a mess. I have the PowerScore bibles and have read about 1/6 of each. I'm going to bump that up so I can finish getting through them within the next three weeks. I also take four practice tests a week.

I know studying is key, but I keep scoring around 158, except for the 163 I got this past weekend. Any advice? I'm starting to feel the pressure because I only have ten weeks left. I just don't know what a reasonable goal is at this point.


"Everything else" from LG is RC and LR. Simply 'studying' isn't key. Understanding where you have a problem, and working to fix it is. LR hinges on short stimuluses, with single big problem/point, which then gets strengthened, weakened, manipulated somehow. RC is a larger text, with various factors playing into each other over the course of a page.

I'd call four full tests a week massive overkill at this point. You want to do individual sections of LR & RC, going through them afterwards to deconstruct every question one by one, working out why one answer is right, and four are wrong. Untimed first, because at around 158, you're still working on the basic underlying logic, you're getting around 10+ wrong per section, 30-45%. Once you can reliably identify them without time pressure, re-introduce the clock.

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Deardevil

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Re: LG really good but lost other places?

Postby Deardevil » Mon Sep 26, 2016 12:03 pm

You only studied for a few weeks and are already taking/wasting PTs?
The LSAT is not something to rush unless you have your sights set on Cooley.

Read through The LSAT Trainer and/or Manhattan Prep (LR/RC); much more useful than PowerScore, imo.
The former provides an overview of all three sections, though not so much RC (compared to LR and LG),
but you can skip the LG bits; the LR chapters helped me a lot, especially with assumptions and argument fallacies.

Next, with basics down, I drilled sets of question types to see where my weaknesses (and strengths) are.
I sucked at weakening and sufficient assumptions; heck, even inferences! I exceled at parallel questions lol.
Once you drill, you get more familiar with the QTs, ACs, stems, etc. All that jazz. Nowadays, I love doing MSS and NAs.

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SunDevil14

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Re: LG really good but lost other places?

Postby SunDevil14 » Tue Sep 27, 2016 11:14 am

Deardevil wrote:You only studied for a few weeks and are already taking/wasting PTs?
The LSAT is not something to rush unless you have your sights set on Cooley.

Read through The LSAT Trainer and/or Manhattan Prep (LR/RC); much more useful than PowerScore, imo.
The former provides an overview of all three sections, though not so much RC (compared to LR and LG),
but you can skip the LG bits; the LR chapters helped me a lot, especially with assumptions and argument fallacies.

Next, with basics down, I drilled sets of question types to see where my weaknesses (and strengths) are.
I sucked at weakening and sufficient assumptions; heck, even inferences! I exceled at parallel questions lol.
Once you drill, you get more familiar with the QTs, ACs, stems, etc. All that jazz. Nowadays, I love doing MSS and NAs.


Read Powerscore and Manhattan Prep, Personally I liked the latter. Most people overlook RC. Treat RC like LG and you will tend to do much better. Re-read/do sections after initially completing them up front. Make sure you map them out and realize were the information and inferences are coming from. Most people overlook the fact that like LG, if you do a lot of work upfront on RC you can blaze through the questions. Overall, the prep books on RC just offer different approaches and guidelines. You need to develop a very mechanical and routine approach that you use every time with ease (akin to LG).

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Blueprint Mithun

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Re: LG really good but lost other places?

Postby Blueprint Mithun » Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:45 pm

puppymeom wrote:Hi all!

I'm taking the December LSAT and I have been studying for the past three weeks. Initial score was 158, best score thus far has been 163.

LG I usually get near perfect or perfect, but everything else is a mess. I have the PowerScore bibles and have read about 1/6 of each. I'm going to bump that up so I can finish getting through them within the next three weeks. I also take four practice tests a week.

I know studying is key, but I keep scoring around 158, except for the 163 I got this past weekend. Any advice? I'm starting to feel the pressure because I only have ten weeks left. I just don't know what a reasonable goal is at this point.



Good job on getting your LG skills up there. But you're taking waaaaaay too many practice tests right now. You shouldn't be taking more than maybe an occasional practice test every other week or so if you haven't finish learning the material in each section. Stop doing PTs and focus on getting through your guides. Make sure you practice the strategies on lots of sample questions of each type after you learn how to approach them. Your goal should be to internalize the strategies - don't worry too much about how many questions you get right, and definitely don't worry about how long it takes you.

If you can internalize the methods, then your potential for improvement in accuracy and speed are much higher. Ten weeks isn't a huge amount of time, but don't feel like you need to do as many practice tests as possible. There are more effective ways to improve, and timed practice tests should mostly be reserved for the last stage of your prep, after you've internalized all the strategies and drilled plenty of questions.



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