Must be true question type

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Destiny0921

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Must be true question type

Postby Destiny0921 » Mon Sep 12, 2016 8:17 pm

So Must be true questions are kicking my ass! Any suggestions on how to best approach these types of questions??

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Barack O'Drama

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Re: Must be true question type

Postby Barack O'Drama » Mon Sep 12, 2016 9:44 pm

Destiny0921 wrote:So Must be true questions are kicking my ass! Any suggestions on how to best approach these types of questions??



Make sure you know your conditional logic and valid and invalid argument forms.

Manhattan LR is great for this as is 7Sage's lessons (Which I used and think are great)
Last edited by Barack O'Drama on Fri Jan 26, 2018 7:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

tskela

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Re: Must be true question type

Postby tskela » Mon Sep 12, 2016 9:47 pm

1) do the directive questions first (ie "If Harry performs third, when must Lisa perform?") and begin building a collection of acceptable situations (ie put Harry 3rd and see what happens) to go along with the acceptable situation you usually identify in the first question for a game
2) look at your MBT answer choices and eliminate those that don't occur in one or more of your acceptable situations
3) examine/test the remaining answer choices too see if they really MBT. usually i only end up having to really examine two, maybe three at max answer choices

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Deardevil

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Re: Must be true question type

Postby Deardevil » Mon Sep 12, 2016 11:09 pm

The question stem indicates a MBT/MSS question if it states that the information given in the stimulus is true.

Stick to the scope.
If the stimulus is all about farm animals, avoid answers that mention those in the wild, on the verge of extinction, etc.

Be wary of slight changes.
A stimulus can read "a lot of owners prefer some dogs," but an AC would not be right if it is something like "some owners prefer a lot of dogs."

Do not make assumptions.
Everything in the stimulus is taken at face value. The premise(s) and conclusion are all valid. Bringing in an assumption implies there's an error.

Watch out for "some" or "most."
No way an AC regarding most people (more than 50%) is correct if the stimulus only refers to some (at least one).
Make sure you know logical opposites; the reverse of "all" is "not all," not "none," and the reverse of "none" is "some."
"Typically" falls in the "most" category, as is "usually," whereas "many," though it may technically be more, essentially means "some."

Here is an example and my breakdown.

Wendy will make it to the birthday party if her boss gives her permission.
All friends of Irene will be attending her birthday party. She turned 26 today.
Irene had the best birthday with her best friend, Joy, and everyone who came, but Wendy was nowhere to be found.

If the statements above are true, which of the following can be inferred?

(A) Joy is 26 years old.
Says who? All we know about Joy is that she is Irene's bestie; it does not mean they knew each other since they were in kindergarten.
(B) If Wendy showed up, Irene still would've had the best birthday.
There's no way of knowing if the outcome is the same if Wendy appeared; perhaps she'd get drunk and cause a scene.
(C) Wendy is one of Irene's friends.
Definitely not; Irene's friends all went and, furthermore, her party is not stated to be exclusive to only people she knows.
(D) Irene ate a red velvet ice cream cake.
There is no information regarding any cake; heck, maybe Irene despises red velvet!
(E) Wendy's boss did not give her permission to go to the party.
This is the only piece of data that is inferable;
if her boss has given permission, Wendy would be guaranteed to go, but she didn't, which must mean her boss is being a jerk.

Mikey

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Re: Must be true question type

Postby Mikey » Tue Sep 13, 2016 11:38 am

[quote="Deardevil"

Wendy will make it to the birthday party if her boss gives her permission.
All friends of Irene will be attending her birthday party. She turned 26 today.
Irene had the best birthday with her best friend, Joy, and everyone who came, but Wendy was nowhere to be found.

If the statements above are true, which of the following can be inferred?

(A) Joy is 26 years old.
Says who? All we know about Joy is that she is Irene's bestie; it does not mean they knew each other since they were in kindergarten.
(B) If Wendy showed up, Irene still would've had the best birthday.
There's no way of knowing if the outcome is the same if Wendy appeared; perhaps she'd get drunk and cause a scene.
(C) Wendy is one of Irene's friends.
Definitely not; Irene's friends all went and, furthermore, her party is not stated to be exclusive to only people she knows.
(D) Irene ate a red velvet ice cream cake.
There is no information regarding any cake; heck, maybe Irene despises red velvet!
(E) Wendy's boss did not give her permission to go to the party.
This is the only piece of data that is inferable;
if her boss has given permission, Wendy would be guaranteed to go, but she didn't, which must mean her boss is being a jerk.[/quote]

would i be wrong to infer that wendy is NOT irene's best friend??



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