Should I withdraw my Sep 25th LSAT and take it in Dec?

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sanduo

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Should I withdraw my Sep 25th LSAT and take it in Dec?

Postby sanduo » Thu Sep 08, 2016 1:31 am

Hi Everyone,
I am currently scoring about 150-155 range and I aim at 165. I don't think I will get there before Sep 25th. Should I withdraw my test and register for the December one? Because I am afraid that if I score bad this time(like 150), that would leave a bad record on me when I apply even though I would score better in Dec.
Until now , I have read powerscore LG and LR bibles and other than that I just use official prep tests.
If I should start aim for the Dec LSAT, should I use more materials,or simply just focus on more prep tests? ( I have at hand 7sage ultimate videos and LSAT trainer , both of which I haven't used)
I think I need the greatest help on LG. What books are you guys suggesting for LG, besides LG bible?
Thank you so much
Last edited by sanduo on Thu Sep 08, 2016 11:00 am, edited 2 times in total.

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brinicolec

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Re: Should I withdraw from my Sep 25th LSAT?

Postby brinicolec » Thu Sep 08, 2016 5:59 am

sanduo wrote:Hi Everyone,
I am currently scoring about 150-155 range and I aim at 165. I don't think I will get there before Sep 25th. Should I withdraw my test and register for the December one? Because I am afraid that if I score bad this time(like 150), that would leave a bad record on me when I apply even though I would score better in Dec.
Until now , I have read powerscore LG and LR bibles and other than that I just use official prep tests.
If I should start aim for the Dec LSAT, should I use more materials,or simply just focus on more prep tests? ( I have at hand 7sage ultimate videos and LSAT trainer , both of which I haven't used)
Thank you so much


Most schools I've looked at seem to look at the higher of two scores, even the ones that say they look at both tend to mention they focus more on the higher score. However, I think I recall seeing something about averaging scores for some LS.... I think withdrawing is up to you. At this point, if you withdraw, you wasted your money registering, but also you're pretty far from your target score so I could see why you may want to hold off.

I don't know anything about the 7sage ultimate videos (but I do use their LG explanation videos), but I used the LSAT Trainer and would recommend it. I think the only section I didn't find it incredibly helpful for was RC, but I also think RC is something that's hard to "learn" and thus, hard to teach. The LR stuff is definitely useful and the LG stuff is pretty useful too (pretty similar to the LG Bible diagramming). I think the answer of whether you should focus on materials or PTs depends on where you are in your studying. Are you having difficulty understanding concepts? Missing a lot of the same kinds of questions? Etc. Based on your score, I'm going to assume that you could benefit from looking at more material because you're missing a fair amount of questions. I'd say try to get a really solid footing by working through the Trainer (and/or other materials) and then, once you're pretty comfortable with your knowledge, begin to take PTs.

TL;DR: Withdrawing makes sense because you're so far from your target score, LSs tend to look at the higher of two scores *though some DO average I think.* LSAT Trainer is a good book. Solidify your LSAT fundamentals before focusing on PTs by working through LSAT materials.

sanduo

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Re: Should I withdraw from my Sep 25th LSAT?

Postby sanduo » Thu Sep 08, 2016 6:07 am

brinicolec wrote:
sanduo wrote:Hi Everyone,
I am currently scoring about 150-155 range and I aim at 165. I don't think I will get there before Sep 25th. Should I withdraw my test and register for the December one? Because I am afraid that if I score bad this time(like 150), that would leave a bad record on me when I apply even though I would score better in Dec.
Until now , I have read powerscore LG and LR bibles and other than that I just use official prep tests.
If I should start aim for the Dec LSAT, should I use more materials,or simply just focus on more prep tests? ( I have at hand 7sage ultimate videos and LSAT trainer , both of which I haven't used)
Thank you so much


Most schools I've looked at seem to look at the higher of two scores, even the ones that say they look at both tend to mention they focus more on the higher score. However, I think I recall seeing something about averaging scores for some LS.... I think withdrawing is up to you. At this point, if you withdraw, you wasted your money registering, but also you're pretty far from your target score so I could see why you may want to hold off.

I don't know anything about the 7sage ultimate videos (but I do use their LG explanation videos), but I used the LSAT Trainer and would recommend it. I think the only section I didn't find it incredibly helpful for was RC, but I also think RC is something that's hard to "learn" and thus, hard to teach. The LR stuff is definitely useful and the LG stuff is pretty useful too (pretty similar to the LG Bible diagramming). I think the answer of whether you should focus on materials or PTs depends on where you are in your studying. Are you having difficulty understanding concepts? Missing a lot of the same kinds of questions? Etc. Based on your score, I'm going to assume that you could benefit from looking at more material because you're missing a fair amount of questions. I'd say try to get a really solid footing by working through the Trainer (and/or other materials) and then, once you're pretty comfortable with your knowledge, begin to take PTs.

TL;DR: Withdrawing makes sense because you're so far from your target score, LSs tend to look at the higher of two scores *though some DO average I think.* LSAT Trainer is a good book. Solidify your LSAT fundamentals before focusing on PTs by working through LSAT materials.



Thank you very much!

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dontsaywhatyoumean

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Re: Should I withdraw from my Sep 25th LSAT?

Postby dontsaywhatyoumean » Thu Sep 08, 2016 6:33 am

Withdrawing may also make sense from the perspective of not using a take.

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reasonable_man

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Re: Should I withdraw from my Sep 25th LSAT?

Postby reasonable_man » Thu Sep 08, 2016 8:26 am

Why are you aiming at a 165? If you are scoring between a 150 and 155 on practice tests, you may as well be aiming at a 178, because both are equally unrealistic right now. If what you would like to score is a 165 and you're scoring between a 150 and 155, what you need to do is absolutely scrap the September LSAT and not consider taking the LSAT until you are consistently testing at or about the 165 to 167 level. That may come before December and it may not. But don't sit for the LSAT until you are scoring consistently at or above the range you would like to score on the actual test. No miracles occur on the day of the LSAT - people don't magically do much better than their practice tests on the day of the exam (generally speaking - I'm sure their are exceptions to the rule - but its highly unlikely). The purpose of being able to take the test more than once and not be forced to average the scores is not to allow you one opportunity to bomb the thing and then fix it later. Its to give you a chance to do well, study harder and maybe do even better the next time around. Don't take the test until you're absolutely ready.

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proteinshake

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Re: Should I withdraw my Sep 25th LSAT and take it in Dec?

Postby proteinshake » Fri Sep 09, 2016 8:08 am

yup, definitely withdraw.

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Barack O'Drama

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Re: Should I withdraw from my Sep 25th LSAT?

Postby Barack O'Drama » Fri Sep 09, 2016 9:38 am

Double Poast
Last edited by Barack O'Drama on Fri Jan 26, 2018 7:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Barack O'Drama

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Re: Should I withdraw from my Sep 25th LSAT?

Postby Barack O'Drama » Fri Sep 09, 2016 9:38 am

reasonable_man wrote:Why are you aiming at a 165? If you are scoring between a 150 and 155 on practice tests, you may as well be aiming at a 178, because both are equally unrealistic right now. If what you would like to score is a 165 and you're scoring between a 150 and 155, what you need to do is absolutely scrap the September LSAT and not consider taking the LSAT until you are consistently testing at or about the 165 to 167 level. That may come before December and it may not. But don't sit for the LSAT until you are scoring consistently at or above the range you would like to score on the actual test. No miracles occur on the day of the LSAT - people don't magically do much better than their practice tests on the day of the exam (generally speaking - I'm sure their are exceptions to the rule - but its highly unlikely). The purpose of being able to take the test more than once and not be forced to average the scores is not to allow you one opportunity to bomb the thing and then fix it later. Its to give you a chance to do well, study harder and maybe do even better the next time around. Don't take the test until you're absolutely ready.



ReasonableMan always gives the best and most reasonable advice! OP, definitely listen to this. Every word!

Use the 7Sage Course to learn everything and use the Powerscore Books in Tandem.

The LSAT Trainer is also very good, I would recommend it highly as well. Maybe consider doing it after you are finished with the 7Sage course - that is my plan.

Don't sign up for the December LSAT until you are averaging your goal score. Going from 155-160 is exponentially easier than going from 160-165 consistently. And as you go up, I realized it gets so much harder. For god sakes, the jump from a 165-170 literally means you have to get TWICE as good as you are. I used to think of this test as linear. For example, if a 160 meant missing 27 questions and a 165 meant missing 20, I thought "OK - I just have to get 7 more right." This was true, but I had no idea how hard those 7 points would be to get when compared to when I sucked and could get low hanging fruit by getting better of games or something. There comes a point in your prep where you will realize the low-hanging fruit is gone and now the improvements only come with mastery and strategy. And I find that, in my experience, this is where most preppers will spend their time.

So make sure you don't sign up until you are ready, or close to it. It just creates undue stress and causes people to rush through important parts of prep in order to meet arbitrary deadlines from self-imposed test dates.
Last edited by Barack O'Drama on Fri Jan 26, 2018 7:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

sanduo

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Re: Should I withdraw from my Sep 25th LSAT?

Postby sanduo » Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:57 pm

reasonable_man wrote:Why are you aiming at a 165? If you are scoring between a 150 and 155 on practice tests, you may as well be aiming at a 178, because both are equally unrealistic right now. If what you would like to score is a 165 and you're scoring between a 150 and 155, what you need to do is absolutely scrap the September LSAT and not consider taking the LSAT until you are consistently testing at or about the 165 to 167 level. That may come before December and it may not. But don't sit for the LSAT until you are scoring consistently at or above the range you would like to score on the actual test. No miracles occur on the day of the LSAT - people don't magically do much better than their practice tests on the day of the exam (generally speaking - I'm sure their are exceptions to the rule - but its highly unlikely). The purpose of being able to take the test more than once and not be forced to average the scores is not to allow you one opportunity to bomb the thing and then fix it later. Its to give you a chance to do well, study harder and maybe do even better the next time around. Don't take the test until you're absolutely ready.


Thank you very much for your advice!



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