Conditional Logic in LR

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scalawag

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Conditional Logic in LR

Postby scalawag » Fri Aug 05, 2016 1:34 pm

So this post is concerned with conditional logic in instances where the average test taker needs to be aware of it to answer the question correctly.

What question types does it appear the most frequently in?

What is your strategy for answering the question? Do you start diagramming as soon as you see that it is conditional logic (it seems like this could eat up some time) or do you wait until you get to the answer choices and determine that you need to diagram to answer the question?

Thanks

Alexandros

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Re: Conditional Logic in LR

Postby Alexandros » Fri Aug 05, 2016 2:13 pm

I think the most common ones are Parallel flaw/reasoning, must be true, and some ID the flaw and assumption questions.
I only diagram conditional logic on parallel flaw/reasoning and the most challenging of the MBT, ID the flaw, and assumption questions. I find a lot of questions with conditional logic are pretty intuitive so diagramming isn't necessary.
My theory with diagramming is - if you can answer it intuitively, then do so. If it's got conditional logic and your eyes glaze over reading it, diagram immediately, because trying to think it out will be more of a time sink than diagramming on the most challenging ones.

eta: I usually diagram immediately on parallel questions when they have conditional logic, with the other questions I'll diagram if I see the stim is very complex or if none of the answers jump out as correct with one or two careful read-throughs.

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scalawag

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Re: Conditional Logic in LR

Postby scalawag » Fri Aug 05, 2016 5:50 pm

Alexandros wrote:I think the most common ones are Parallel flaw/reasoning, must be true, and some ID the flaw and assumption questions.
I only diagram conditional logic on parallel flaw/reasoning and the most challenging of the MBT, ID the flaw, and assumption questions. I find a lot of questions with conditional logic are pretty intuitive so diagramming isn't necessary.
My theory with diagramming is - if you can answer it intuitively, then do so. If it's got conditional logic and your eyes glaze over reading it, diagram immediately, because trying to think it out will be more of a time sink than diagramming on the most challenging ones.

eta: I usually diagram immediately on parallel questions when they have conditional logic, with the other questions I'll diagram if I see the stim is very complex or if none of the answers jump out as correct with one or two careful read-throughs.


Thank you sir

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SunDevil14

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Re: Conditional Logic in LR

Postby SunDevil14 » Fri Aug 05, 2016 6:29 pm

I'd diagram parallel reasoning questions with conditional logic. You are looking at 6 different arguments in a very short amount of time. The slightest lapse in memory can lead to an incorrect answer and or spending much more time on the question.

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Blueprint Mithun

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Re: Conditional Logic in LR

Postby Blueprint Mithun » Fri Aug 05, 2016 9:20 pm

scalawag wrote:So this post is concerned with conditional logic in instances where the average test taker needs to be aware of it to answer the question correctly.

What question types does it appear the most frequently in?

What is your strategy for answering the question? Do you start diagramming as soon as you see that it is conditional logic (it seems like this could eat up some time) or do you wait until you get to the answer choices and determine that you need to diagram to answer the question?

Thanks


The three most common question types to feature conditional logic are:

Must Be True (Inference) questions. This is especially true of the ones that explicitly ask for something that must be true, rather than the "most strongly supported." With MBTs, you'll want to diagram all the conditionals and see if you can make any inferences using contrapositives and the transitive property. Do this even before you look at the answer choices - if one of your inferences shows up in there, it's the correct answer.

Parallel/Parallel Flaw questions. If the stimulus features conditionals, then you can be sure that the correct answer will have the exact same conditional logic, just with different terms. So diagram the stimulus, try and eliminate any answers that obviously don't match up (not enough conditionals, not the same logical strength, etc.), and diagram out any answers that you think are viable in order to test them. This can be time-consuming, so once you've moved on to timed practice, be wary of the clock.

Sufficient Assumption questions. In this case, you're looking for something that bridges the gap. Diagram out the stimulus, but be sure to put the premises and conclusion in the correct place. Afterwards, try and come up with at least one conditional statement that would link the premises to the conclusion. So if your premise was "A --> C" and your conclusion was "A --> F," some valid answers would be "C--> F" and "Not F --> Not C." As with MBTs, you may have to play around with contrapositives to find the correct answer.

With each of these three question types, if I see conditional statements, I immediately begin diagramming the stimulus. With Parallel questions, I rarely diagram every answer because that's so time consuming, but I'd recommend doing that for practice, just not in a real testing situation.

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scalawag

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Re: Conditional Logic in LR

Postby scalawag » Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:06 pm

Blueprint Mithun wrote:
scalawag wrote:So this post is concerned with conditional logic in instances where the average test taker needs to be aware of it to answer the question correctly.

What question types does it appear the most frequently in?

What is your strategy for answering the question? Do you start diagramming as soon as you see that it is conditional logic (it seems like this could eat up some time) or do you wait until you get to the answer choices and determine that you need to diagram to answer the question?

Thanks


The three most common question types to feature conditional logic are:

Must Be True (Inference) questions. This is especially true of the ones that explicitly ask for something that must be true, rather than the "most strongly supported." With MBTs, you'll want to diagram all the conditionals and see if you can make any inferences using contrapositives and the transitive property. Do this even before you look at the answer choices - if one of your inferences shows up in there, it's the correct answer.

Parallel/Parallel Flaw questions. If the stimulus features conditionals, then you can be sure that the correct answer will have the exact same conditional logic, just with different terms. So diagram the stimulus, try and eliminate any answers that obviously don't match up (not enough conditionals, not the same logical strength, etc.), and diagram out any answers that you think are viable in order to test them. This can be time-consuming, so once you've moved on to timed practice, be wary of the clock.

Sufficient Assumption questions. In this case, you're looking for something that bridges the gap. Diagram out the stimulus, but be sure to put the premises and conclusion in the correct place. Afterwards, try and come up with at least one conditional statement that would link the premises to the conclusion. So if your premise was "A --> C" and your conclusion was "A --> F," some valid answers would be "C--> F" and "Not F --> Not C." As with MBTs, you may have to play around with contrapositives to find the correct answer.

With each of these three question types, if I see conditional statements, I immediately begin diagramming the stimulus. With Parallel questions, I rarely diagram every answer because that's so time consuming, but I'd recommend doing that for practice, just not in a real testing situation.


This is very helpful thanks



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