breaking down MBT's

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NigeranOU

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breaking down MBT's

Postby NigeranOU » Fri Jul 22, 2016 2:27 am

I don't have a specific method I use to attack these questions. I just read it closely and circle words that point out the scope (this enables me to eliminate many answer choices) from there I reread. It takes too much time! I need to attack each of them the same. Can someone give me a step by step method to use for breaking down must be trues?

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thepsychedelic

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Re: breaking down MBT's

Postby thepsychedelic » Fri Jul 22, 2016 2:51 am

So I just joined, but I figured I might be able to help a bit. First, you should know your conditional statements (If..., then) and how to take the contrapositive (switch and negate the conditional). If you recognize conditional statements in the stimulus, likely the answer choice will involve a combination of the sentences or the contrapositive of the statements. If there aren't conditional statements, look at what the stimulus is saying and especially focus in on strong statements, and then anticipate an answer choice that follows along those lines. Hope this helped, it might be kind of confusing haha
Last edited by thepsychedelic on Tue Jan 30, 2018 4:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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mwells56

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Re: breaking down MBT's

Postby mwells56 » Fri Jul 22, 2016 2:57 am

All you really gotta know for MBT's are how to properly identify your conditionals. From there on out it's usually mapping with maybe a sprinkle of intuition. If you're really having trouble, shoot me a PM with a specific question and I'll do my best to help you out.

Mikey

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Re: breaking down MBT's

Postby Mikey » Fri Jul 22, 2016 11:18 am

Basically what mwells said. Some MBT questions don't require conditional logic, but some do. The ones that don't require it, are based on intuition and careful reading. The ones that require conditional logic take practice and time to get familiar with but once you have it down, they're not so bad. Just know your conditional rules and indicators such as "unless" which indicates a necessary condition.

For example: "You will not do well on the LSAT unless you have studied"
As conditional logic, something that makes sense from this statement would look something like "DWOL--> S". If you do well on the LSAT, then you have studied.
But if you run the contrapositive it would be "S --> DWOL". If you have not studied, you will not do well on the LSAT

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Blueprint Mithun

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Re: breaking down MBT's

Postby Blueprint Mithun » Tue Jul 26, 2016 9:35 pm

NigeranOU wrote:I don't have a specific method I use to attack these questions. I just read it closely and circle words that point out the scope (this enables me to eliminate many answer choices) from there I reread. It takes too much time! I need to attack each of them the same. Can someone give me a step by step method to use for breaking down must be trues?


One of the interesting things about MBTs is that they're one of the few LR question types that don't present you with an argument - instead, they just give you a collection of facts, or premises. It's your job to see how these link together, and to find a conclusion that has to logically follow. So there's no argument analysis here.

Like everyone else has mentioned, it's really important to be solid on your understanding of conditional statements. That means you can identify conditionals and diagram them easily, and link together multiple conditional statements. If you can master this skill, you'll be getting most of these right.

It's important to be aware of the difference between MBT and their cousins: soft MBT questions. These are the ones that ask for the conclusion that is "most strongly supported." In this case, you don't need an answer that is a 100% foolproof conclusion, it just has to be the most likely of all the answers. So look for a link between the premises, and use the process of elimination to narrow down your choices. With soft MBTs, you won't be able to get the answer through diagramming quite as often, so it's important to read carefully and see how the facts fit together.



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