I do better at harder questions

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NigeranOU

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I do better at harder questions

Postby NigeranOU » Tue Jul 19, 2016 8:43 pm

than easier ones. I just missed a question that was first in a test and got one that was 22nd in a test right. I consistently see that in my prep. What does that mean?

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scalawag

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby scalawag » Wed Jul 20, 2016 10:57 am

It seems like the first and last groups of questions are the easiest. So in general the first and last game are the easiest and the first 10 and last 10 of LR are easiest.

Not sure what that means I definitely do better at easy LR questions. There are answer choices that are just dumb (sometimes intentionally humorous I think).

It means you need to read and pay attention because that's all those questions take.

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34iplaw

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby 34iplaw » Wed Jul 20, 2016 12:36 pm

As someone who fairly consistently gets the questions that 60% of people miss but still miss ones that 85% of people get.

It's either misreading or it's over thinking it.

For some reason, there is this japanese garden question that I just do not get.

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Blueprint Mithun

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby Blueprint Mithun » Wed Jul 20, 2016 5:29 pm

34iplaw wrote:As someone who fairly consistently gets the questions that 60% of people miss but still miss ones that 85% of people get.

It's either misreading or it's over thinking it.

For some reason, there is this japanese garden question that I just do not get.


Care to share it? Might be able to help explain it.

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34iplaw

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby 34iplaw » Wed Jul 20, 2016 5:55 pm

Blueprint Mithun wrote:
34iplaw wrote:As someone who fairly consistently gets the questions that 60% of people miss but still miss ones that 85% of people get.

It's either misreading or it's over thinking it.

For some reason, there is this japanese garden question that I just do not get.


Care to share it? Might be able to help explain it.


I appreciate it.

It was #5 from the first LR of June 2011.

NigeranOU

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby NigeranOU » Wed Jul 20, 2016 8:38 pm

34iplaw wrote:As someone who fairly consistently gets the questions that 60% of people miss but still miss ones that 85% of people get.

It's either misreading or it's over thinking it.

For some reason, there is this japanese garden question that I just do not get.


I could definitely see the overthinking explanation. I just feel like my entire livelihood rests on this tests and the pressure feels crushing somedays. I aim for 100% accuracy everytime. This test is literally eating me alive.

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Blueprint Mithun

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby Blueprint Mithun » Wed Jul 20, 2016 9:17 pm

34iplaw wrote:
Blueprint Mithun wrote:
34iplaw wrote:As someone who fairly consistently gets the questions that 60% of people miss but still miss ones that 85% of people get.

It's either misreading or it's over thinking it.

For some reason, there is this japanese garden question that I just do not get.


Care to share it? Might be able to help explain it.


I appreciate it.

It was #5 from the first LR of June 2011.


Ah, interesting. This is a necessary assumption question, so we need to find an answer that absolutely has to be true for the conclusion to follow. We can use the negation test as well - if the opposite of the assumption makes the conclusion invalid, then that answer works.

Premise: The design of Japanese gardens should reflect harmony with nature.

Conclusion: Rocks chosen for placement in these gardens should vary in appearance because rocks in nature vary in appearance.

So the leap here is that in order to display harmony with nature, things (or rocks, specifically) placed in the garden should be similar in appearance, or in some way mimic the way they are in nature.

(B) works as answer, because it says that that regarding rocks, the imitation of nature helps to achieve harmony in nature. If this were negated, it would tell us that the imitation of nature DOES NOT help to achieve harmony in nature, thus breaking the argument.

(C) is a tempting answer, is it the one you chose? It isn't quite a necessary assumption. It says that the only criterion for placement in these gardens is the expression of harmony with nature. But do we know that mimicking nature expresses harmony with it? Those aren't quite the same thing, so this doesn't fully bridge the gap. Also, be wary of strong statements, like ones that use the word "only," when looking for a necessary assumption. For this to be correct, what it mentioned would have to be the only criterion regarding placing the rocks. Even if it wasn't the only one, there could be other rules that force us to mimic the way rocks are placed in nature.

(E) is too strong because it says that "each" component of a genuine garden is varied. We don't need each component to be varied, just rocks.

(D) brings up being natural, which isn't the same as any of the things we're concerned with. It is perhaps a subtle term shift, but a significant one.

(A) We're not sure what the key values are, and even if harmony with nature is one of them, we don't need them all to be true.

Does that help?

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34iplaw

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby 34iplaw » Thu Jul 21, 2016 11:06 am

Blueprint Mithun wrote:
34iplaw wrote:
Blueprint Mithun wrote:
34iplaw wrote:As someone who fairly consistently gets the questions that 60% of people miss but still miss ones that 85% of people get.

It's either misreading or it's over thinking it.

For some reason, there is this japanese garden question that I just do not get.


Care to share it? Might be able to help explain it.


I appreciate it.

It was #5 from the first LR of June 2011.


Ah, interesting. This is a necessary assumption question, so we need to find an answer that absolutely has to be true for the conclusion to follow. We can use the negation test as well - if the opposite of the assumption makes the conclusion invalid, then that answer works.

Premise: The design of Japanese gardens should reflect harmony with nature.

Conclusion: Rocks chosen for placement in these gardens should vary in appearance because rocks in nature vary in appearance.

So the leap here is that in order to display harmony with nature, things (or rocks, specifically) placed in the garden should be similar in appearance, or in some way mimic the way they are in nature.

(B) works as answer, because it says that that regarding rocks, the imitation of nature helps to achieve harmony in nature. If this were negated, it would tell us that the imitation of nature DOES NOT help to achieve harmony in nature, thus breaking the argument.

(C) is a tempting answer, is it the one you chose? It isn't quite a necessary assumption. It says that the only criterion for placement in these gardens is the expression of harmony with nature. But do we know that mimicking nature expresses harmony with it? Those aren't quite the same thing, so this doesn't fully bridge the gap. Also, be wary of strong statements, like ones that use the word "only," when looking for a necessary assumption. For this to be correct, what it mentioned would have to be the only criterion regarding placing the rocks. Even if it wasn't the only one, there could be other rules that force us to mimic the way rocks are placed in nature.

(E) is too strong because it says that "each" component of a genuine garden is varied. We don't need each component to be varied, just rocks.

(D) brings up being natural, which isn't the same as any of the things we're concerned with. It is perhaps a subtle term shift, but a significant one.

(A) We're not sure what the key values are, and even if harmony with nature is one of them, we don't need them all to be true.

Does that help?


When I took the test, I picked D... although I flagged B as going through the questions. When I blind reviewed, I picked C. I had hesitation with (C) because of only... just didn't act on it. I eliminated (D) during BR for the reason that you pointed out.. During Blind Review, this is one of the four questions on the entire test that I had wrong after going over it. The other being #14 in that section (which I understand now but I still kind of want to contend that it's a terrible question.)

It does help. I think I sort of need to work on endurance and making sure that I'm firing on all cylinders before I go into the test...taking the test, I went -3 on the 2nd LR section and -9 on the first, granted I had to guess blindly on 5 questions on the first section (all of which I got wrong) but managed to finish the other LR section without guessing).

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RamTitan

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Re: I do better at harder questions

Postby RamTitan » Thu Jul 21, 2016 1:11 pm

NigeranOU wrote:
34iplaw wrote:As someone who fairly consistently gets the questions that 60% of people miss but still miss ones that 85% of people get.

It's either misreading or it's over thinking it.

For some reason, there is this japanese garden question that I just do not get.


I could definitely see the overthinking explanation. I just feel like my entire livelihood rests on this tests and the pressure feels crushing somedays. I aim for 100% accuracy everytime. This test is literally eating me alive.

Stop aiming for 100% accuracy. Once you shift your frame of mind to "wow, this test is easy; I get most of the questions right", not only will studying be more enjoyable and less stressful, but you'll find that you'll do better overall.

Perfection is highly variable. Getting more than 85 or 90 problems right every test? Not so much



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