Sudoku?

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brinicolec

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Sudoku?

Postby brinicolec » Tue Jul 19, 2016 3:59 pm

I've seen a couple posts of people recommending doing sudoku and was wondering if anyone felt strongly on this/if it's helped anyone improve. Also thinking about starting to read The Economist.

Basically, I don't want to do too much with drilling just yet since I've already gone through so much material (I'm retaking) but still want to be spending time everyday doing something that usually leads to score improvement.

I'm also currently reading through the LSAT Trainer again and following his study guide because I used a different study guide last time.
Last edited by brinicolec on Tue Jul 19, 2016 5:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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pretzeltime

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby pretzeltime » Tue Jul 19, 2016 4:03 pm

Helped me a little bit. When I was retaking I got a little obsessed with it and played on my phone a lot and it helped tune up my mind. Helps automate some inference making and some spacial thinking (for lack of a better word).

It's no substitute for........anything really. But it might help a bit. And it's kind of fun so why not.

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FayRays

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby FayRays » Tue Jul 19, 2016 4:29 pm

For me I find the Atlantic has more sophisticated words and articles.
one thing I advice though, try to go to your public library and get the older editions because they allow you to take them for 2 weeks better then subscribing and paying a lot of money.
My greedy school does not allow us to check out any magazine, but the public library allows us to check out the older editions, like what the difference between July and June editions, they are all good :D
Any brain games will help your brain, which is always a good thing. I just learned Sudoku a week ago, I am playing it from time to time and I find printing it on paper, then playing on a paper is much harder than playing it on your phone, because this way you get to write the numbers you gonna eliminate and your predictions.

I also use these app on my phone : Luminosity, Elevate ( I think it's really good to improve your reading habits and stuff), Brain trainer and Accelerate to help you read faster

of course many of them have free stuff, but you can a pro member too

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KissMyAxe

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby KissMyAxe » Tue Jul 19, 2016 4:39 pm

I didn't personally find the Atlantic or Economist helped me all that much in the reading comp department. I think it's much better to just do reading comp passages (I've heard you can use SAT, GMAT, MCAT, and GRE passages too) and develop a system for labeling where stuff is (like the author's opinion, theme, etc). I think you're wasting time reading the two of them in the hopes of it improving your score, though of course they have other value. I will say there is some creedence to reading Scientific American articles if you are a humanities guy and completely unschooled in science, as I was. I keeps you from being bogged down by scientific terms.

Sudoku is absolutely fantastic. Most logic puzzles are. If you want a little more variety, try this site. http://www.puzzle-nurikabe.com/
That's nurikabe, which is a lot of fun, but I also highly recommend light-up, bridges, and nonograms, which are all at the bottom of the page. I'm terrible at dominosa, but feel free to try that as well.

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KissMyAxe

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby KissMyAxe » Tue Jul 19, 2016 5:15 pm

FayRays wrote:I also use these app on my phone : Luminosity, Elevate ( I think it's really good to improve your reading habits and stuff), Brain trainer and Accelerate to help you read faster


I can't speak to Elevate, but I'd be very skeptical of any "brain training" game. Lumosity was launched with absolutely 0 evidence to back up their claims that their games improve brain function, and multiple scientific studies have shown it only makes you better at those games (as practice does with anything). That's why the FTC fined them $2 million a few years ago for fraud. If you enjoy the games of Lumosity, by all means play them, but definitely don't waste any money of it, and don't think it will help you at all with the LSAT.

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brinicolec

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby brinicolec » Tue Jul 19, 2016 5:15 pm

Thanks for the replies/resources!

I went to the bookstore and got The Economist and Scientific Amer. because I'm a psychology major and never really loved science so I, too, get a bit bogged down in scientific lang. Figured I could try The Economist this once since so many people tend to recommend it and if I don't like it, just stick to the Scientific American because science passages are my least favorite.

Also decided to get USA Today's Logic Puzzles instead of sudoku because some of the games reminded me of games I used to do when I was in gifted classes, which reminded me of LGs, so we'll see if I think they're of any use.

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mukol

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby mukol » Tue Jul 19, 2016 5:18 pm

brinicolec wrote:I'm also currently reading through the LSAT Trainer again and following his study guide because I used a different study guide last time.


What section do you need the most improvement in, and what question type in that section do you need the most improvement in?

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brinicolec

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby brinicolec » Tue Jul 19, 2016 5:30 pm

mukol wrote:
brinicolec wrote:I'm also currently reading through the LSAT Trainer again and following his study guide because I used a different study guide last time.


What section do you need the most improvement in, and what question type in that section do you need the most improvement in?


My June LSAT breakdown was LG -6, LR -7 (total), RC -7. LG was abnormal (hadn't missed that many in LG in at least a month) and I think it was because it was the first section and test nerves so I've been focusing more on LR and RC (which is why I've decided to try reading because I don't LOVE LSAT Trainer's RC stuff).

EDIT: Sorry, forgot to answer the second question.

Unfortunately, my mistakes are kind of all over the place and I think some of it had to do with timing. Even though I PT'd a lot, I never really got myself to speed up enough to be comfortable so towards the ends of sections, I was usually rushed.

Like I said, for LG, I know what happened. I froze up for no apparent reason and then ended up having to skip around and guess on more difficult questions for the sake of time.

LR: A couple I think I bubbled in backwards (dumb mistake, I know). Timing issues towards the end (so think similar reasoning questions). Also some issues with RA questions.

RC: I don't think it's so much about the questions as me needing to get stronger with passages. Also got destroyed by the clay tokens passage (4 of my misses in RC were from that one passage smh).

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FayRays

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby FayRays » Wed Jul 20, 2016 2:58 am

KissMyAxe wrote:
FayRays wrote:I also use these app on my phone : Luminosity, Elevate ( I think it's really good to improve your reading habits and stuff), Brain trainer and Accelerate to help you read faster


I can't speak to Elevate, but I'd be very skeptical of any "brain training" game. Lumosity was launched with absolutely 0 evidence to back up their claims that their games improve brain function, and multiple scientific studies have shown it only makes you better at those games (as practice does with anything). That's why the FTC fined them $2 million a few years ago for fraud. If you enjoy the games of Lumosity, by all means play them, but definitely don't waste any money of it, and don't think it will help you at all with the LSAT.


no I am playing them for the long run. I read a lot that brain games help your brain be active and delay potential diseases like Alzheimer and I play them because they are fun, but I am not gonna lie I guess I believe they will help me somehow or the other :mrgreen:
and yeah I am gonna unsubscribe from most of these games 2 months from now don't worry.

However, I didn't know about luminosity law suit. How can they prove it does not help 10 years from now or 30 years from now? They can't really know. Anyway, regardless of brain games, I think that if you truly believe any particular method will improve your abilities, it surprisingly will.

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FayRays

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby FayRays » Wed Jul 20, 2016 3:00 am

KissMyAxe wrote:I didn't personally find the Atlantic or Economist helped me all that much in the reading comp department. I think it's much better to just do reading comp passages (I've heard you can use SAT, GMAT, MCAT, and GRE passages too) and develop a system for labeling where stuff is (like the author's opinion, theme, etc). I think you're wasting time reading the two of them in the hopes of it improving your score, though of course they have other value. I will say there is some creedence to reading Scientific American articles if you are a humanities guy and completely unschooled in science, as I was. I keeps you from being bogged down by scientific terms.

Sudoku is absolutely fantastic. Most logic puzzles are. If you want a little more variety, try this site. http://www.puzzle-nurikabe.com/
That's nurikabe, which is a lot of fun, but I also highly recommend light-up, bridges, and nonograms, which are all at the bottom of the page. I'm terrible at dominosa, but feel free to try that as well.



This website have many cool puzzles, thank you!

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Walliums

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby Walliums » Wed Jul 20, 2016 3:45 pm

KissMyAxe wrote:I didn't personally find the Atlantic or Economist helped me all that much in the reading comp department. I think it's much better to just do reading comp passages (I've heard you can use SAT, GMAT, MCAT, and GRE passages too) and develop a system for labeling where stuff is (like the author's opinion, theme, etc). I think you're wasting time reading the two of them in the hopes of it improving your score, though of course they have other value. I will say there is some creedence to reading Scientific American articles if you are a humanities guy and completely unschooled in science, as I was. I keeps you from being bogged down by scientific terms.

Sudoku is absolutely fantastic. Most logic puzzles are. If you want a little more variety, try this site. http://www.puzzle-nurikabe.com/
That's nurikabe, which is a lot of fun, but I also highly recommend light-up, bridges, and nonograms, which are all at the bottom of the page. I'm terrible at dominosa, but feel free to try that as well.


Thank you for this website! I'm already a little addicted to Nurikabe... but is there a way to increase the difficulty?

CoGar

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Re: Sudoku?

Postby CoGar » Wed Jul 20, 2016 4:52 pm

From everything that ive heard, when it comes to RC there is no substitute or better practice method than doing RC passages. Its a specific kind of structured reading throughout almost every passage from test to test, master those and dont waste time on the Economist of WSJ. There are literally hundreds of RC passages out there for you to get your hands on

CoGar

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Re: Sudoku?

Postby CoGar » Wed Jul 20, 2016 4:53 pm

From everything that ive heard, when it comes to RC there is no substitute or better practice method than doing RC passages. Its a specific kind of structured reading throughout almost every passage from test to test, master those and dont waste time on the Economist of WSJ. There are literally hundreds of RC passages out there for you to get your hands on

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KissMyAxe

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby KissMyAxe » Wed Jul 20, 2016 5:58 pm

Walliums wrote:
KissMyAxe wrote:I didn't personally find the Atlantic or Economist helped me all that much in the reading comp department. I think it's much better to just do reading comp passages (I've heard you can use SAT, GMAT, MCAT, and GRE passages too) and develop a system for labeling where stuff is (like the author's opinion, theme, etc). I think you're wasting time reading the two of them in the hopes of it improving your score, though of course they have other value. I will say there is some creedence to reading Scientific American articles if you are a humanities guy and completely unschooled in science, as I was. I keeps you from being bogged down by scientific terms.

Sudoku is absolutely fantastic. Most logic puzzles are. If you want a little more variety, try this site. http://www.puzzle-nurikabe.com/
That's nurikabe, which is a lot of fun, but I also highly recommend light-up, bridges, and nonograms, which are all at the bottom of the page. I'm terrible at dominosa, but feel free to try that as well.


Thank you for this website! I'm already a little addicted to Nurikabe... but is there a way to increase the difficulty?


Outside of adding boxes, I don't believe so. The 20x20 is a pretty decent challenge while still being beatable in a decent amount of time though (12 minutes or so?). If you really want to get into a challenging one, then try slither link or shikaku at the higher difficulties (after learning how they work of course). There's another site with puzzles, the tic tac logic could be particularly helpful for LSAT logic game training.

http://www.conceptispuzzles.com/index.aspx

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Walliums

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Re: Sodoku?

Postby Walliums » Thu Jul 21, 2016 7:58 am

KissMyAxe wrote:Outside of adding boxes, I don't believe so. The 20x20 is a pretty decent challenge while still being beatable in a decent amount of time though (12 minutes or so?). If you really want to get into a challenging one, then try slither link or shikaku at the higher difficulties (after learning how they work of course). There's another site with puzzles, the tic tac logic could be particularly helpful for LSAT logic game training.

http://www.conceptispuzzles.com/index.aspx


Thanks - I realized last night that there is a sidebar on the left where you can add boxes. I just missed it before... derp.



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