core/conclusion focus ( revised question)

User avatar
ltowns1
Posts: 696
Joined: Mon May 26, 2014 1:13 am

core/conclusion focus ( revised question)

Postby ltowns1 » Sat Jun 27, 2015 9:13 pm

Let me put this question another way, does anyone find it easier to eliminate answers on the first round of cuts by just focusing on the answers that seem to make illogical statements, drastic scope ships, etc. and then on the two or three questions that me be left, you focus on the core to choose which one makes the most sense. I find it easier to eliminate wrong answers on the first go around almost solely on the conclusion. IM NOT SAYING YOU DONT PAY ATTENTION TO THE CORE...just that it's easier to cut off a few wrong answer by paying attention/ primarily focusing on the conclusion? Has any one else found this to be true??? Or am I just completely wrong?????
Last edited by ltowns1 on Mon Jun 29, 2015 7:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Oskosh
Posts: 1026
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2014 3:18 pm

Re: Balance between focusing on core/conclusion???

Postby Oskosh » Sat Jun 27, 2015 9:34 pm

ltowns1 wrote:At times it can be hard figuring out how the implicit assumptions,(premise (s) + conclusion) relate to the answer choices because you're tryin to keep both elements in your head at the same time.For anyone out there especially LSAT experts, and top scorers, is there a balance between sticking to the core and really just focusing on the conclusion?? Sometimes it seems hard to identify how an answer is related to the premise side of the core, but it's much easier to focus on solely the conclusion. I've been around here long enough to know that it's basically an LSAT felony not to solely focus on the core relationship in an argument, but what do you guys think? Is there a balance between how much one should focus on the core or solely on the conclusion when analyzing the answers wrong/right, and why does it seem easier to eliminate answers solely by focusing on the conclusion in some assumption family questions?

What do you mean? I'm confused.

You need the premises, because the premises tell you how the conclusion is being supported. Otherwise any of the answer choices for an assumption family question could be valid. You need to look at the premises and how they relate to the conclusion.

Think of a causality question.

A is always correlated with B. Therefore a causes b.

How would you weaken/strengthen this?

In order to select the best answer, you have to understand that the argument is saying that because a and b are correlated, there is a causal connection between the two of them.

That's just one example.

I don't understand if that's what you're asking, though. Retaining an understanding of the LR should not be too hard. It's just a small paragraph, and not a reading comp passage.

User avatar
ltowns1
Posts: 696
Joined: Mon May 26, 2014 1:13 am

Re: Balance between focusing on core/conclusion???

Postby ltowns1 » Sat Jun 27, 2015 10:38 pm

Oskosh wrote:
ltowns1 wrote:At times it can be hard figuring out how the implicit assumptions,(premise (s) + conclusion) relate to the answer choices because you're tryin to keep both elements in your head at the same time.For anyone out there especially LSAT experts, and top scorers, is there a balance between sticking to the core and really just focusing on the conclusion?? Sometimes it seems hard to identify how an answer is related to the premise side of the core, but it's much easier to focus on solely the conclusion. I've been around here long enough to know that it's basically an LSAT felony not to solely focus on the core relationship in an argument, but what do you guys think? Is there a balance between how much one should focus on the core or solely on the conclusion when analyzing the answers wrong/right, and why does it seem easier to eliminate answers solely by focusing on the conclusion in some assumption family questions?

What do you mean? I'm confused.

You need the premises, because the premises tell you how the conclusion is being supported. Otherwise any of the answer choices for an assumption family question could be valid. You need to look at the premises and how they relate to the conclusion.

Think of a causality question.

A is always correlated with B. Therefore a causes b.

How would you weaken/strengthen this?

In order to select the best answer, you have to understand that the argument is saying that because a and b are correlated, there is a causal connection between the two of them.

That's just one example.

I don't understand if that's what you're asking, though. Retaining an understanding of the LR should not be too hard. It's just a small paragraph, and not a reading comp passage.



I totally get that you need the premise, and I understand that the core of the argument is very important. But you don't find times when it's simply easier to just focus almost solely on the conclusion? Take for instance some streg/weaken questions, and some of the harder necessary assumption questionss. Again, I'm not saying all the time or even most, but for maybe three to four questions it seems like it helps.....no????

User avatar
ltowns1
Posts: 696
Joined: Mon May 26, 2014 1:13 am

Re: core/conclusion focus ( revised question)

Postby ltowns1 » Mon Jun 29, 2015 7:06 pm

ltowns1 wrote:Let me put this question another way, does anyone find it easier to eliminate answers on the first round of cuts by just focusing on the answers that seem to make illogical statements, drastic scope ships, etc. and then on the two or three questions that me be left, you focus on the core to choose which one makes the most sense. I find it easier to eliminate wrong answers on the first go around almost solely on the conclusion. IM NOT SAYING YOU DONT PAY ATTENTION TO THE CORE...just that it's easier to cut off a few wrong answer by paying attention/ primarily focusing on the conclusion? Has any one else found this to be true??? Or am I just completely wrong?????



Revised question...




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests