The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodations

tasmith
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The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodations

Postby tasmith » Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:54 pm

I probably should not even be thinking ahead or even consider the contingency, but if I end up taking it again after Monday I plan on acquiring the accommodations.

I am ADD and have been since I was diagnosed in elementary school. Currently I take 30mg XR Adderall daily for my condition. I received accommodations in my undergrad for extra time and course material, where only documented proof from a current physician was all that was needed to suffice.

I collected said documented proof, documentation of the undergrad accommodations for proof of prior granted accommodations, and was ready to submit request for the lsat accommodations months ago until I spoke with the most lovely and enthusiastic lsac rep on their phone line *sarcasm*. She said that only a current official diagnosis will be sufficient for granting of the accommodations, and that historical diagnosis from childhood is obsolete.

So I went to my doctor and was told that he doesn't administer the "CPT-II" or "TOVA" and that he did not have any suggestions or references on where to find an official who could. I went to an old shrink I had from pre-high school days who also could not administer such tests, but sent me to someone who could. What a surprise, that person who could did not accept my current insurance that I have from my job so I was at another dead end. I eventually said fuck it and will just go in unaccommodating guns hot.

Now if, God forbid, I have to take it again and knowing that extra time would provide nothing but pure beneficial gain since primarily the issue is not with difficulty or inability to answer, but doing so within the allotted time per question/section.

Anyone who has applied and was successfully granted the accommodations for the LSAT due to ADD. Please shed some light on the process and the resources you utilized in order to do so. If this applies to anyone in the DFW metroplex their input would be even better as that is currently where I reside, work, and will take future tests (if need be).

Acquiring an official current diagnosis just seems like such a pain in the ass because I am not aware of where to go to get it and how much time and money the process will consume.

Also I am bit worried that after a current diagnostic that it will result in data suggesting I am no longer ADD and should not be prescribed Adderall anymore indefinitely.

Sorry for the rant, thanks for any feedback, good luck to everyone else testing Monday.


tasmith
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby tasmith » Sun Jun 07, 2015 12:11 am

Probably the best idea, but I am still curious. Always have a back up plan.

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Jeffort
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby Jeffort » Sun Jun 07, 2015 3:35 am

tasmith wrote:Probably the best idea, but I am still curious. Always have a back up plan.


What range are you scoring in on your recent PT's taken under the standard time limit?

If you take the test on Monday under normal/non-accommodated timed conditions and achieve an above the median mid/high 150's or 160s range score, it could pretty much guarantee you'll never be granted special accommodations for extra time for a future administration. LSAC takes prior scores into account if you've taken it before when evaluating whether or not to grant extra time.

Although LSAC did recently enter into a consent decree with the DOJ after being sued about unfairly denying people special accommodations and making even just applying for them a royal and very expensive pain in the arse, most of the major changes and requirements imposed on LSAC by the agreement are related to and most benefit people that have received accommodations on other standardized tests before and/or have an extensive history of receiving special accommodations predating and through college that includes having had an IEP (individualized education plan or something like that) due to disability in grade school/middle school and/or high school. Many of the particulars about specifically how LSAC has to change the ways it evaluates special accoms requests due to the DOJ agreement aside from the automatic must approve rules for people that got extra time on certain specific standardized tests previously (including the SAT) are still being litigated, and the agreement doesn't say they have to grant extra time just because somebody got it for UG classes/exams. Did you get extra time for the SAT?

Unless you fall into one of the categories the consent decree mandates or whatever other particular situations that are still being debated and litigated end up finally being that LSAC must automatically grant extra-time for, achieving an above median score under standard time conditions will make it nearly impossible for you to get granted extra time for a later administration since it shows you're able to perform above average and above most of the regular pool of test takers that's presumed non-disabled without having extra time.

Just some food for thought. If you want to read the specifics about the consent decree with the DOJ and about the specific changes LSAC is supposed to make in reviewing spec. accoms requests that are still being litigated, there's a link on LSAC's home page to all of the information and documents.

GL

PodPeople
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby PodPeople » Sun Jun 07, 2015 7:22 am

GL/Jeff -

Is that just your hunch that LSAC would take prior test scores into consideration? Or did you find that in a document somewhere? Just curious as to whether or not that is written down...

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Jeffort
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby Jeffort » Sun Jun 07, 2015 3:09 pm

PodPeople wrote:GL/Jeff -

Is that just your hunch that LSAC would take prior test scores into consideration? Or did you find that in a document somewhere? Just curious as to whether or not that is written down...


Not a hunch. It's been written down as one of the explicit reasons LSAC cited for denying special accommodations in their response/request denied letter to some test takers I've worked with over the years that have applied for extra time.

PodPeople
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby PodPeople » Sun Jun 07, 2015 3:18 pm

Thanks for the response : )

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RZ5646
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby RZ5646 » Sun Jun 07, 2015 4:49 pm

This might open a can of worms, but why are people given accommodations for ADHD at all? Will you also get extra time on law school exams? Even if you do, once you become a lawyer your employer certainly won't give you extra time to do your work.

It just doesn't make sense to me to give some people extra time (and I believe it's a lot of extra time) if the LSAT is anything at all like law school / lawyering (which it's supposed to be, in essence at least). There's a point to having a time limit.

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A. Nony Mouse
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sun Jun 07, 2015 5:32 pm

RZ5646 wrote:This might open a can of worms, but why are people given accommodations for ADHD at all? Will you also get extra time on law school exams? Even if you do, once you become a lawyer your employer certainly won't give you extra time to do your work.

It just doesn't make sense to me to give some people extra time (and I believe it's a lot of extra time) if the LSAT is anything at all like law school / lawyering (which it's supposed to be, in essence at least). There's a point to having a time limit.

This keeps coming up AGAIN and AGAIN. Whether or not you think someone should get accommodations for ADHD, LSAC got smacked by the DOJ for failing to accommodate people with disabilities under the ADA, which includes ADHD and may under certain circumstances merit accommodations. Accordingly, they now need to offer accommodations, as do law schools (though obviously they're not handing them out like candy or the OP wouldn't be running into these problems). And taking the LSAT (and law school exams) is absolutely nothing like the practice of law (not saying neither tests relevant skills - although there are plenty of pertinent skills that don't get tested at all - I'm saying the conditions are nothing like the conditions of practicing law), so getting accommodations does not mean someone isn't capable of success as a lawyer.

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Jeffort
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby Jeffort » Sun Jun 07, 2015 5:33 pm

RZ5646 wrote:This might open a can of worms, but why are people given accommodations for ADHD at all? Will you also get extra time on law school exams? Even if you do, once you become a lawyer your employer certainly won't give you extra time to do your work.

It just doesn't make sense to me to give some people extra time (and I believe it's a lot of extra time) if the LSAT is anything at all like law school / lawyering (which it's supposed to be, in essence at least). There's a point to having a time limit.


That can of worms was busted wide open and things got really mean and nasty creepy crawly slimy recently in this thread in the law students forum:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=247101

I don't think it would be healthy for the forum or for any people with disabilities to rehash all that vitriol again, at least not here in the LSAT prep forum.

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RZ5646
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby RZ5646 » Sun Jun 07, 2015 6:11 pm

A. Nony Mouse wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:This might open a can of worms, but why are people given accommodations for ADHD at all? Will you also get extra time on law school exams? Even if you do, once you become a lawyer your employer certainly won't give you extra time to do your work.

It just doesn't make sense to me to give some people extra time (and I believe it's a lot of extra time) if the LSAT is anything at all like law school / lawyering (which it's supposed to be, in essence at least). There's a point to having a time limit.

This keeps coming up AGAIN and AGAIN. Whether or not you think someone should get accommodations for ADHD, LSAC got smacked by the DOJ for failing to accommodate people with disabilities under the ADA, which includes ADHD and may under certain circumstances merit accommodations. Accordingly, they now need to offer accommodations, as do law schools (though obviously they're not handing them out like candy or the OP wouldn't be running into these problems). And taking the LSAT (and law school exams) is absolutely nothing like the practice of law (not saying neither tests relevant skills - although there are plenty of pertinent skills that don't get tested at all - I'm saying the conditions are nothing like the conditions of practicing law), so getting accommodations does not mean someone isn't capable of success as a lawyer.


Oh okay so it's a legal thing. Didn't want to start a war, I just honestly did not understand the reasoning behind it.

tasmith
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Re: The underlying issue will always be time management so here are questions for those who have been granted accommodat

Postby tasmith » Mon Jun 08, 2015 8:53 am

@Jeffort
No nothing on an official standardized test. Just some high school and a good majority of undergrad classes. Either way I got 4.5 hours until test time, with no accommodations.




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