Since there are less people taking the exam, will the curve generally be more forgiving?

robertrulez
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Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2012 5:35 pm

Since there are less people taking the exam, will the curve generally be more forgiving?

Postby robertrulez » Mon May 11, 2015 6:12 pm

I ask this because I've consistently been PT at -20 on the entire test and that's been my goal since it usually leads to at least a 163 which is my ideal score. However, some exams I've noticed this hasn't always been the case and one test for example, December 2007, I scored a 161 but still got -20.

Now that the law school bubble has burst and there are less test takers/high scorers, will the curve generally be more forgiving? I've noticed on recent exams that a -20 led to a 164 which would be great!

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nlee10
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Re: Since there are less people taking the exam, will the curve generally be more forgiving?

Postby nlee10 » Mon May 11, 2015 6:25 pm

No, curve is predetermined.

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hairbear7
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Re: Since there are less people taking the exam, will the curve generally be more forgiving?

Postby hairbear7 » Mon May 11, 2015 6:28 pm

nlee10 wrote:No, curve is predetermined.


This. The amount of people taking the test has zero impact on what the curve is.

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leslieknope
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Re: Since there are less people taking the exam, will the curve generally be more forgiving?

Postby leslieknope » Mon May 11, 2015 6:33 pm

The LSAT is equated, not curved. It's designed so that tests of varying difficulty will yield the same score. That means that on an easier test, you'd need to get -9 for a 170, whereas on a more difficult test, you'd be able to go -13 to get that same 170. In theory, the same performance should get you the same score within a +/-3 point range on different tests. Like nlee said, the scale is predetermined based on how people do on the questions when they're the experimental section, so a change in the quality of the applicant pool simply means less people get the high scores.

I wouldn't focus on how many you can get wrong if I were you. Focus on your scaled score and make sure you're PTing comfortably above your goal before you take the LSAT, because test day drop is too real (personally dropped ~4 points off where I was PTing both times I took the LSAT).

robertrulez
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Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2012 5:35 pm

Re: Since there are less people taking the exam, will the curve generally be more forgiving?

Postby robertrulez » Mon May 11, 2015 6:57 pm

leslieknope wrote:The LSAT is equated, not curved. It's designed so that tests of varying difficulty will yield the same score. That means that on an easier test, you'd need to get -9 for a 170, whereas on a more difficult test, you'd be able to go -13 to get that same 170. In theory, the same performance should get you the same score within a +/-3 point range on different tests. Like nlee said, the scale is predetermined based on how people do on the questions when they're the experimental section, so a change in the quality of the applicant pool simply means less people get the high scores.

I wouldn't focus on how many you can get wrong if I were you. Focus on your scaled score and make sure you're PTing comfortably above your goal before you take the LSAT, because test day drop is too real (personally dropped ~4 points off where I was PTing both times I took the LSAT).


Hmm I see, makes sense! My scores seems to be all over the place honesty which is what worries me, though at least I've been consistently hitting above 160. Praying for no test day drop though :evil: :evil:




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