hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

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flash21
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hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby flash21 » Tue Apr 21, 2015 7:46 pm

This quote is from the book "mastery" by George Leonard. The point is that being a slower learner may turn out to be an advantage.. struggling LSAT studiers, continue to persevere!

"In his book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, Zen master Shunryu Suzuki approaches the question of fast and slow learners in terms of horses. “In our scriptures, it is said that there are four kinds of horses: excellent ones, good ones, poor ones, and bad ones. The best horse will run slow and fast, right and left, at the driver’s will, before it sees the shadow of the whip; the second best will run as well as the first one, just before the whip reaches its skin; the third one will run when it feels pain on its body; the fourth will run after the pain penetrates to the marrow of its bones. You can imagine how difficult it is for the fourth one to learn to run.

“When we hear this story, almost all of us want to be the best horse. If it is impossible to be the best one, we want to be the second best.” But this is a mistake, Master Suzuki says. When you learn too easily, you’re tempted not to work hard, not to penetrate to the marrow of a practice.

“If you study calligraphy, you will find that those who are not so clever usually become the best calligraphers. Those who are very clever with their hands often encounter great difficulty after they have reached a certain stage. This is also true in art, and in life.” The best horse, according to Suzuki, may be the worst horse. And the worse horse can be the best, for if it perseveres, it will have learned whatever it is practising all the way to the marrow of its bones.

Suzuki's parable of the four horses has haunted me ever since I first heard it. For one thing, it poses a clear challenge for the person with exceptional talent: to achieve his or her full potential, this person will have to work just as diligently as those with less innate ability." -- END QUOTE

Essentially, being worse at something or a slow learner forces us to break a practice down to the most fundamental and core parts, ultimately making us excel past the point we may have got to if we were more talented.

What do you guys think?

PoopNpants
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Re: hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby PoopNpants » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:15 pm

Horses aren't to be trusted

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Clyde Frog
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Re: hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby Clyde Frog » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:33 pm

PoopNpants wrote:Horses aren't to be trusted

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Big Red
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Re: hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby Big Red » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:35 pm

I would trust the mini-horse form Rob & Big

Does this book go into detail about the size of the horse?

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MarkinKansasCity
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Re: hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby MarkinKansasCity » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:36 pm

PoopNpants wrote:Horses aren't to be trusted


But they make great glue. Ask Boxer. Oh wait, you can't.

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Deleterious
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Re: hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby Deleterious » Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:14 pm

flash21 wrote:This quote is from the book "mastery" by George Leonard. The point is that being a slower learner may turn out to be an advantage.. struggling LSAT studiers, continue to persevere!

"In his book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, Zen master Shunryu Suzuki approaches the question of fast and slow learners in terms of horses. “In our scriptures, it is said that there are four kinds of horses: excellent ones, good ones, poor ones, and bad ones. The best horse will run slow and fast, right and left, at the driver’s will, before it sees the shadow of the whip; the second best will run as well as the first one, just before the whip reaches its skin; the third one will run when it feels pain on its body; the fourth will run after the pain penetrates to the marrow of its bones. You can imagine how difficult it is for the fourth one to learn to run.

“When we hear this story, almost all of us want to be the best horse. If it is impossible to be the best one, we want to be the second best.” But this is a mistake, Master Suzuki says. When you learn too easily, you’re tempted not to work hard, not to penetrate to the marrow of a practice.

“If you study calligraphy, you will find that those who are not so clever usually become the best calligraphers. Those who are very clever with their hands often encounter great difficulty after they have reached a certain stage. This is also true in art, and in life.” The best horse, according to Suzuki, may be the worst horse. And the worse horse can be the best, for if it perseveres, it will have learned whatever it is practising all the way to the marrow of its bones.

Suzuki's parable of the four horses has haunted me ever since I first heard it. For one thing, it poses a clear challenge for the person with exceptional talent: to achieve his or her full potential, this person will have to work just as diligently as those with less innate ability." -- END QUOTE

Essentially, being worse at something or a slow learner forces us to break a practice down to the most fundamental and core parts, ultimately making us excel past the point we may have got to if we were more talented.

What do you guys think?


i like this. Thanks for sharing.

jeech
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Nov 20, 2014 7:56 pm

Re: hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby jeech » Wed Apr 22, 2015 7:52 am

Thanks for sharing the quote. I needed to hear this....

KDLMaj
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 4:07 pm

Re: hi guys, wanted to share a quote in this book I was reading

Postby KDLMaj » Wed Apr 22, 2015 10:35 pm

jeech wrote:Thanks for sharing the quote. I needed to hear this....


You know Isaac Newton was so slow as a child that his family feared he would never be able to live on his own. People would ask him a question, and he would take FOREVER to respond. Turns out- young Newton was just so damn smart that even when faced with a seemingly simple question he would become overwhelmed with all of the possibilities. He wasn't slow because he couldn't think of an answer, he was slow because he had to sort through 10x the number of potential answers that most people do. Fast =/= Smart. It never has. The timing constraints on the LSAT are not only unfounded, they're counterproductive.

And the next time you find yourself feeling overwhelmed and questioning your own intelligence, I want you to make a list of the hardest things you've ever faced in your life. Deaths, Illness, Disability, Disease, Thesis, Marathons, Divorce?

Then you look at that stack of papers in front of you that you call a prep test or prep book and ask yourself, "Is this stack of papers really the thing that's finally going to do me in?".

I doubt it.




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