New to RC: question about PT6, #25

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StickerAdverse
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New to RC: question about PT6, #25

Postby StickerAdverse » Sat Apr 11, 2015 3:00 pm

I really hate #25 on PT6's RC. Can anyone help me figure it out?

It is an inference question asking how specialty-steel mills are different from producers because specialty steel mills do what?

The answer is (E), that they do not operate blast furnaces. However, the only validation for this is line 50-57: "specialty steel mills...have dispensed of...blast-furnace operation."

Now I know that this is obviously on point to show that SSM's don't operate blast furnaces. HOWEVER, why would this necessarily mean that this is how SSMs DIFFER from producers? It never said that producers do / don't operate blast furnaces!

This is pretty frustrating.

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Clyde Frog
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Joined: Sun May 26, 2013 2:27 am

Re: New to RC: question about PT6, #25

Postby Clyde Frog » Sat Apr 11, 2015 4:53 pm

StickerAdverse wrote:I really hate #25 on PT6's RC. Can anyone help me figure it out?

It is an inference question asking how specialty-steel mills are different from producers because specialty steel mills do what?

The answer is (E), that they do not operate blast furnaces. However, the only validation for this is line 50-57: "specialty steel mills...have dispensed of...blast-furnace operation."

Now I know that this is obviously on point to show that SSM's don't operate blast furnaces. HOWEVER, why would this necessarily mean that this is how SSMs DIFFER from producers? It never said that producers do / don't operate blast furnaces!

This is pretty frustrating.


This is a tough passage by the way. I even took a labor history class in college that was centered around all this stuff and I still remember it being tough.

Anyways

At the end of paragraph three it says that the common denominator of integrated producers is their inefficient process that is rooted in the 19th century.

Paragraph four continues this discussion and says that the integrated producers can't compete with minimills and speciality mills because they have dispensed almost entirely of the iron-smelting process, mining raw materials and blast furnace operations. It's basically saying that minimills and speciality mills have changed their processes but integrated producers haven't, thus they (integrated producers) still use blast furnaces.

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Jeffort
Posts: 1897
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: New to RC: question about PT6, #25

Postby Jeffort » Sat Apr 11, 2015 5:00 pm

StickerAdverse wrote:I really hate #25 on PT6's RC. Can anyone help me figure it out?

It is an inference question asking how specialty-steel mills are different from producers because specialty steel mills do what?

The answer is (E), that they do not operate blast furnaces. However, the only validation for this is line 50-57: "specialty steel mills...have dispensed of...blast-furnace operation."

Now I know that this is obviously on point to show that SSM's don't operate blast furnaces. HOWEVER, why would this necessarily mean that this is how SSMs DIFFER from producers? It never said that producers do / don't operate blast furnaces!

This is pretty frustrating.


Although the passage never explicitly states in a single sentence/phrase/place in the passage that "integrated producers operate blast furnaces", the passage does establish that they do. That fact about them is established by synthesis of multiple pieces of information given in a few different places in the passage. This means that several pieces of evidence/information given about integrated producers, when combined together (synthesized/synthesis), support the inference that they do in fact operate blast furnaces.

The scattered pieces of evidence that when synthesized together establish that integrated producers operate blast furnaces are:

Lines 6-7 (1st paragraph): 'The integrated producers start with iron ore and coal and produce a wide assortment of shaped steels.'

This tells you that they start with the raw materials and actually make steel from iron ore and that they use coal (fuel burned in furnaces to heat them up).

Lines 46-49 (last sentence of the 3rd paragraph):

'The fact is that the common technological denominator of integrated producers is an inherently inefficient process that is still rooted in the nineteenth century.'

combined with the first sentence of the 4th paragraph, lines 50-57:

'Integrated producers have been unable to compete successfully with minimills because the minimills, like specialty-steel mills, have dispensed almost entirely with the archaic energy- and capital-intensive front end of integrated steelmaking: the iron-smelting process, including the mining and preparation of the raw materials and the blast-furnace operation.'

Put together the facts given in lines 6-7 that they start with iron ore and coal with the end of the 3rd paragraph (the technology used by integrated producers is an old inefficient 'still rooted in the nineteenth century' process) and also with the beginning of the 4th paragraph which describes the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini-mills that, like specialty mills have dispensed almost entirely with the 'archaic' (referring back to what the last sentence of the 3rd paragraph said, 'nineteenth century') front end process establishes that integrated steel producers operate blast furnaces.

The info from lines 6-7 isn't essential for synthesizing the inference that most integrated steel producers do operate blast furnaces, but is helpful. You can make the inference needed to understand why (E) is correct for Q#25 just from the combination of the last sentence of the 3rd and first sentence of the 4th paragraphs or even just from the first sentence of the 4th paragraph alone.

The first sentence of the fourth paragraph is a comparative statement about integrated steel mills vs. mini mills and specialty steel mills that tells you the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini mills. The mini mills, like the specialty steel mills have 'dispensed almost entirely with the ... front end of integrated steel making...'. That comparative statement alone establishes that integrated producers have NOT stopped using the archaic nineteenth century energy and labor intensive front end processes including smelting and operating blast furnaces, and that that is the cause/reason why they haven't been able to compete successfully with the other types of mills that 'dispensed' with doing those 'front end integrated steel making' processes.

The described front end steel making processes integrated producers perform includes getting raw iron ore mined out of the ground and making it into steel before then making particular steel objects, and blast furnaces are part of the process to melt down the ore to make it into steel, hence the 'front end'/beginning of the entire process used to produce the end products, things made from steel.

Since you're new to RC, it's important to know that LSAT RC questions test you much more heavily about things that are established by the passage via inference/synthesis, meaning ideas that are established/that you can logically infer from synthesizing multiple explicitly given statements/facts/ideas together than it tests you about things that are explicitly stated. This means that only a small amount of RC questions per section are basic/low level difficulty 'regurgitate things explicitly stated in the passage' ones that simply test your low level basic reading skills about things that are explicitly stated. LSAT RC questions are designed to test your big picture structural analysis and synthesis/inference skills much more heavily than your short term memory/ability to memorize all the things and details explicitly stated.

Here's a link to an LSAC report about how they developed the RC question types that explains the different levels and types of reading comprehension skills the different question types are designed to test. The higher difficulty level questions typically test your synthesis/inference skills and your big picture/what are the bigger main important ideas in the passage (as opposed to the minutia supporting details) recognition skills.

http://www.testpublishers.org/assets/do ... l%2013.pdf

.

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ltowns1
Posts: 694
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Re: New to RC: question about PT6, #25

Postby ltowns1 » Sun Apr 12, 2015 11:49 am

Jeffort wrote:
StickerAdverse wrote:I really hate #25 on PT6's RC. Can anyone help me figure it out?

It is an inference question asking how specialty-steel mills are different from producers because specialty steel mills do what?

The answer is (E), that they do not operate blast furnaces. However, the only validation for this is line 50-57: "specialty steel mills...have dispensed of...blast-furnace operation."

Now I know that this is obviously on point to show that SSM's don't operate blast furnaces. HOWEVER, why would this necessarily mean that this is how SSMs DIFFER from producers? It never said that producers do / don't operate blast furnaces!

This is pretty frustrating.


Although the passage never explicitly states in a single sentence/phrase/place in the passage that "integrated producers operate blast furnaces", the passage does establish that they do. That fact about them is established by synthesis of multiple pieces of information given in a few different places in the passage. This means that several pieces of evidence/information given about integrated producers, when combined together (synthesized/synthesis), support the inference that they do in fact operate blast furnaces.

The scattered pieces of evidence that when synthesized together establish that integrated producers operate blast furnaces are:

Lines 6-7 (1st paragraph): 'The integrated producers start with iron ore and coal and produce a wide assortment of shaped steels.'

This tells you that they start with the raw materials and actually make steel from iron ore and that they use coal (fuel burned in furnaces to heat them up).

Lines 46-49 (last sentence of the 3rd paragraph):

'The fact is that the common technological denominator of integrated producers is an inherently inefficient process that is still rooted in the nineteenth century.'

combined with the first sentence of the 4th paragraph, lines 50-57:

'Integrated producers have been unable to compete successfully with minimills because the minimills, like specialty-steel mills, have dispensed almost entirely with the archaic energy- and capital-intensive front end of integrated steelmaking: the iron-smelting process, including the mining and preparation of the raw materials and the blast-furnace operation.'

Put together the facts given in lines 6-7 that they start with iron ore and coal with the end of the 3rd paragraph (the technology used by integrated producers is an old inefficient 'still rooted in the nineteenth century' process) and also with the beginning of the 4th paragraph which describes the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini-mills that, like specialty mills have dispensed almost entirely with the 'archaic' (referring back to what the last sentence of the 3rd paragraph said, 'nineteenth century') front end process establishes that integrated steel producers operate blast furnaces.

The info from lines 6-7 isn't essential for synthesizing the inference that most integrated steel producers do operate blast furnaces, but is helpful. You can make the inference needed to understand why (E) is correct for Q#25 just from the combination of the last sentence of the 3rd and first sentence of the 4th paragraphs or even just from the first sentence of the 4th paragraph alone.

The first sentence of the fourth paragraph is a comparative statement about integrated steel mills vs. mini mills and specialty steel mills that tells you the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini mills. The mini mills, like the specialty steel mills have 'dispensed almost entirely with the ... front end of integrated steel making...'. That comparative statement alone establishes that integrated producers have NOT stopped using the archaic nineteenth century energy and labor intensive front end processes including smelting and operating blast furnaces, and that that is the cause/reason why they haven't been able to compete successfully with the other types of mills that 'dispensed' with doing those 'front end integrated steel making' processes.

The described front end steel making processes integrated producers perform includes getting raw iron ore mined out of the ground and making it into steel before then making particular steel objects, and blast furnaces are part of the process to melt down the ore to make it into steel, hence the 'front end'/beginning of the entire process used to produce the end products, things made from steel.

Since you're new to RC, it's important to know that LSAT RC questions test you much more heavily about things that are established by the passage via inference/synthesis, meaning ideas that are established/that you can logically infer from synthesizing multiple explicitly given statements/facts/ideas together than it tests you about things that are explicitly stated. This means that only a small amount of RC questions per section are basic/low level difficulty 'regurgitate things explicitly stated in the passage' ones that simply test your low level basic reading skills about things that are explicitly stated. LSAT RC questions are designed to test your big picture structural analysis and synthesis/inference skills much more heavily than your short term memory/ability to memorize all the things and details explicitly stated.

Here's a link to an LSAC report about how they developed the RC question types that explains the different levels and types of reading comprehension skills the different question types are designed to test. The higher difficulty level questions typically test your synthesis/inference skills and your big picture/what are the bigger main important ideas in the passage (as opposed to the minutia supporting details) recognition skills.

http://www.testpublishers.org/assets/do ... l%2013.pdf

.


Hey Jeffort, just curious but do they have any similar discussions of the LR or LG Sections?

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Jeffort
Posts: 1897
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: New to RC: question about PT6, #25

Postby Jeffort » Wed Apr 15, 2015 1:25 am

ltowns1 wrote:
Jeffort wrote:
StickerAdverse wrote:I really hate #25 on PT6's RC. Can anyone help me figure it out?

It is an inference question asking how specialty-steel mills are different from producers because specialty steel mills do what?

The answer is (E), that they do not operate blast furnaces. However, the only validation for this is line 50-57: "specialty steel mills...have dispensed of...blast-furnace operation."

Now I know that this is obviously on point to show that SSM's don't operate blast furnaces. HOWEVER, why would this necessarily mean that this is how SSMs DIFFER from producers? It never said that producers do / don't operate blast furnaces!

This is pretty frustrating.


Although the passage never explicitly states in a single sentence/phrase/place in the passage that "integrated producers operate blast furnaces", the passage does establish that they do. That fact about them is established by synthesis of multiple pieces of information given in a few different places in the passage. This means that several pieces of evidence/information given about integrated producers, when combined together (synthesized/synthesis), support the inference that they do in fact operate blast furnaces.

The scattered pieces of evidence that when synthesized together establish that integrated producers operate blast furnaces are:

Lines 6-7 (1st paragraph): 'The integrated producers start with iron ore and coal and produce a wide assortment of shaped steels.'

This tells you that they start with the raw materials and actually make steel from iron ore and that they use coal (fuel burned in furnaces to heat them up).

Lines 46-49 (last sentence of the 3rd paragraph):

'The fact is that the common technological denominator of integrated producers is an inherently inefficient process that is still rooted in the nineteenth century.'

combined with the first sentence of the 4th paragraph, lines 50-57:

'Integrated producers have been unable to compete successfully with minimills because the minimills, like specialty-steel mills, have dispensed almost entirely with the archaic energy- and capital-intensive front end of integrated steelmaking: the iron-smelting process, including the mining and preparation of the raw materials and the blast-furnace operation.'

Put together the facts given in lines 6-7 that they start with iron ore and coal with the end of the 3rd paragraph (the technology used by integrated producers is an old inefficient 'still rooted in the nineteenth century' process) and also with the beginning of the 4th paragraph which describes the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini-mills that, like specialty mills have dispensed almost entirely with the 'archaic' (referring back to what the last sentence of the 3rd paragraph said, 'nineteenth century') front end process establishes that integrated steel producers operate blast furnaces.

The info from lines 6-7 isn't essential for synthesizing the inference that most integrated steel producers do operate blast furnaces, but is helpful. You can make the inference needed to understand why (E) is correct for Q#25 just from the combination of the last sentence of the 3rd and first sentence of the 4th paragraphs or even just from the first sentence of the 4th paragraph alone.

The first sentence of the fourth paragraph is a comparative statement about integrated steel mills vs. mini mills and specialty steel mills that tells you the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini mills. The mini mills, like the specialty steel mills have 'dispensed almost entirely with the ... front end of integrated steel making...'. That comparative statement alone establishes that integrated producers have NOT stopped using the archaic nineteenth century energy and labor intensive front end processes including smelting and operating blast furnaces, and that that is the cause/reason why they haven't been able to compete successfully with the other types of mills that 'dispensed' with doing those 'front end integrated steel making' processes.

The described front end steel making processes integrated producers perform includes getting raw iron ore mined out of the ground and making it into steel before then making particular steel objects, and blast furnaces are part of the process to melt down the ore to make it into steel, hence the 'front end'/beginning of the entire process used to produce the end products, things made from steel.

Since you're new to RC, it's important to know that LSAT RC questions test you much more heavily about things that are established by the passage via inference/synthesis, meaning ideas that are established/that you can logically infer from synthesizing multiple explicitly given statements/facts/ideas together than it tests you about things that are explicitly stated. This means that only a small amount of RC questions per section are basic/low level difficulty 'regurgitate things explicitly stated in the passage' ones that simply test your low level basic reading skills about things that are explicitly stated. LSAT RC questions are designed to test your big picture structural analysis and synthesis/inference skills much more heavily than your short term memory/ability to memorize all the things and details explicitly stated.

Here's a link to an LSAC report about how they developed the RC question types that explains the different levels and types of reading comprehension skills the different question types are designed to test. The higher difficulty level questions typically test your synthesis/inference skills and your big picture/what are the bigger main important ideas in the passage (as opposed to the minutia supporting details) recognition skills.

http://www.testpublishers.org/assets/do ... l%2013.pdf

.


Hey Jeffort, just curious but do they have any similar discussions of the LR or LG Sections?


None that are published for public consumption that I've found by looking through all the research and other reports LSAC has available on their site or through many google searches I've tried. :(

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ltowns1
Posts: 694
Joined: Mon May 26, 2014 1:13 am

Re: New to RC: question about PT6, #25

Postby ltowns1 » Wed Apr 15, 2015 10:49 am

Jeffort wrote:
ltowns1 wrote:
Jeffort wrote:
StickerAdverse wrote:I really hate #25 on PT6's RC. Can anyone help me figure it out?

It is an inference question asking how specialty-steel mills are different from producers because specialty steel mills do what?

The answer is (E), that they do not operate blast furnaces. However, the only validation for this is line 50-57: "specialty steel mills...have dispensed of...blast-furnace operation."

Now I know that this is obviously on point to show that SSM's don't operate blast furnaces. HOWEVER, why would this necessarily mean that this is how SSMs DIFFER from producers? It never said that producers do / don't operate blast furnaces!

This is pretty frustrating.


Although the passage never explicitly states in a single sentence/phrase/place in the passage that "integrated producers operate blast furnaces", the passage does establish that they do. That fact about them is established by synthesis of multiple pieces of information given in a few different places in the passage. This means that several pieces of evidence/information given about integrated producers, when combined together (synthesized/synthesis), support the inference that they do in fact operate blast furnaces.

The scattered pieces of evidence that when synthesized together establish that integrated producers operate blast furnaces are:

Lines 6-7 (1st paragraph): 'The integrated producers start with iron ore and coal and produce a wide assortment of shaped steels.'

This tells you that they start with the raw materials and actually make steel from iron ore and that they use coal (fuel burned in furnaces to heat them up).

Lines 46-49 (last sentence of the 3rd paragraph):

'The fact is that the common technological denominator of integrated producers is an inherently inefficient process that is still rooted in the nineteenth century.'

combined with the first sentence of the 4th paragraph, lines 50-57:

'Integrated producers have been unable to compete successfully with minimills because the minimills, like specialty-steel mills, have dispensed almost entirely with the archaic energy- and capital-intensive front end of integrated steelmaking: the iron-smelting process, including the mining and preparation of the raw materials and the blast-furnace operation.'

Put together the facts given in lines 6-7 that they start with iron ore and coal with the end of the 3rd paragraph (the technology used by integrated producers is an old inefficient 'still rooted in the nineteenth century' process) and also with the beginning of the 4th paragraph which describes the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini-mills that, like specialty mills have dispensed almost entirely with the 'archaic' (referring back to what the last sentence of the 3rd paragraph said, 'nineteenth century') front end process establishes that integrated steel producers operate blast furnaces.

The info from lines 6-7 isn't essential for synthesizing the inference that most integrated steel producers do operate blast furnaces, but is helpful. You can make the inference needed to understand why (E) is correct for Q#25 just from the combination of the last sentence of the 3rd and first sentence of the 4th paragraphs or even just from the first sentence of the 4th paragraph alone.

The first sentence of the fourth paragraph is a comparative statement about integrated steel mills vs. mini mills and specialty steel mills that tells you the cause/reason why integrated producers have been unable to successfully compete with mini mills. The mini mills, like the specialty steel mills have 'dispensed almost entirely with the ... front end of integrated steel making...'. That comparative statement alone establishes that integrated producers have NOT stopped using the archaic nineteenth century energy and labor intensive front end processes including smelting and operating blast furnaces, and that that is the cause/reason why they haven't been able to compete successfully with the other types of mills that 'dispensed' with doing those 'front end integrated steel making' processes.

The described front end steel making processes integrated producers perform includes getting raw iron ore mined out of the ground and making it into steel before then making particular steel objects, and blast furnaces are part of the process to melt down the ore to make it into steel, hence the 'front end'/beginning of the entire process used to produce the end products, things made from steel.

Since you're new to RC, it's important to know that LSAT RC questions test you much more heavily about things that are established by the passage via inference/synthesis, meaning ideas that are established/that you can logically infer from synthesizing multiple explicitly given statements/facts/ideas together than it tests you about things that are explicitly stated. This means that only a small amount of RC questions per section are basic/low level difficulty 'regurgitate things explicitly stated in the passage' ones that simply test your low level basic reading skills about things that are explicitly stated. LSAT RC questions are designed to test your big picture structural analysis and synthesis/inference skills much more heavily than your short term memory/ability to memorize all the things and details explicitly stated.

Here's a link to an LSAC report about how they developed the RC question types that explains the different levels and types of reading comprehension skills the different question types are designed to test. The higher difficulty level questions typically test your synthesis/inference skills and your big picture/what are the bigger main important ideas in the passage (as opposed to the minutia supporting details) recognition skills.

http://www.testpublishers.org/assets/do ... l%2013.pdf

.


Hey Jeffort, just curious but do they have any similar discussions of the LR or LG Sections?


None that are published for public consumption that I've found by looking through all the research and other reports LSAC has available on their site or through many google searches I've tried. :(


Bastards lol




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