The best way to articulate the gap in assumption family ques

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ltowns1
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The best way to articulate the gap in assumption family ques

Postby ltowns1 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 10:20 pm

Hey guys, I'm wondering about which way is the best way to articulate the assumption. Getting pretty good at figure out the gap between the argument, but I torn between two ways in regards to articulate the assumption in my head.

1. Just articulate the premise and conclusion without figuring any implicit assumptions.. I literally just take the core, recite it in my head, prephrase the answer and go about my business.

2. I actually figure out an implicit assumption, and then recite it in my head, prephrase the answer, and figure out the answer.

The problem. is, I feel like I need to stick to one way, I just don't know which way choose? Both ways seem to work well, although I haven't really done a comparison. if I get a question wrong, I doubt whether I used the right approach. (Even though my scores have gotten better)

I hope I'm making myself clear with this, but I just want to know if you guys have any suggestions, or what worked for you best?

(If anyone is confused on what I mean, I'll be glad to give an example)
Last edited by ltowns1 on Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:22 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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RZ5646
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Re: LR The best way to figure out the assumption

Postby RZ5646 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 10:51 pm

What kind of assumptions are you talking about?

Sufficient assumption - prephrasing is often easy

Necessary assumption - prephrasing is potentially detrimental because it can be almost impossible to guess the one assumption they are looking for.

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ltowns1
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Re: LR The best way to figure out the assumption

Postby ltowns1 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:03 pm

RZ5646 wrote:What kind of assumptions are you talking about?

Sufficient assumption - prephrasing is often easy

Necessary assumption - prephrasing is potentially detrimental because it can be almost impossible to guess the one assumption they are looking for.



No, just generally on assumption family questions. Weaken, stregthen, suff, necessary, flaw.

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RZ5646
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Re: LR The best way to figure out the assumption

Postby RZ5646 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:07 pm

ltowns1 wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:What kind of assumptions are you talking about?

Sufficient assumption - prephrasing is often easy

Necessary assumption - prephrasing is potentially detrimental because it can be almost impossible to guess the one assumption they are looking for.



No, just generally on assumption family questions. Weaken, stregthen, suff, necessary, flaw.


For sufficient and flaw, the issue usually jumps out at me as I read the stimulus, so I prephrase. For the rest I just go down the answer choices until I find TCR. Sometimes TCR will jump out at me and I'll just pick it and move on; other times I do the two-step method of first crossing out wrong answers and then deciding between what's left.

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ltowns1
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Re: LR The best way to figure out the assumption

Postby ltowns1 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:17 pm

RZ5646 wrote:
ltowns1 wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:What kind of assumptions are you talking about?

Sufficient assumption - prephrasing is often easy

Necessary assumption - prephrasing is potentially detrimental because it can be almost impossible to guess the one assumption they are looking for.



No, just generally on assumption family questions. Weaken, stregthen, suff, necessary, flaw.


For sufficient and flaw, the issue usually jumps out at me as I read the stimulus, so I prephrase. For the rest I just go down the answer choices until I find TCR. Sometimes TCR will jump out at me and I'll just pick it and move on; other times I do the two-step method of first crossing out wrong answers and then deciding between what's left.



But in the initial step of actually finding the assumption, how do you state it. Say I had a somehing like this premise: the shoe factory is on other side of town, therefore Joe will not go there.

Would you say to yourself in the intial step of figuring the assumption: 1. You're assuming that just because the factory is on the other side of town he will not go (no implicit assumption made here, you're essentially just goin with the core as stated)

Or do you say something like: you're assuming that the other side of town is far away, or something like that. (Implicit assumption)

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RZ5646
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Re: The best way to articulate assumption family questions

Postby RZ5646 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:30 pm

I make it as simple as possible. As I was reading that, I was just like, boom, "Joe can't go to the other side of town."

There are always many possible correct answers for assumption questions like that (example other sufficient assumptions: Joe is dead or otherwise incapable of "going" anywhere, Joe lives in Berlin during the Cold War and the KGB will prevent him from crossing to the other side of town, Joe has an anti-shoe-factory force field around him [note: this reveals the ambiguity in your "there"... do you mean he can't go to "other side of town" or to the "shoe factory"], etc.), but in general you should just think of the simplest possible assumption, since that's the one that is most likely to be TCR (that's just how LSAC writes questions).

Note then that for necessary, weaken, and strengthen, where TCR usually is "creative" and not easy to just hit upon by yourself, there's no point in prephrasing. Just read the answer choices.
Last edited by RZ5646 on Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ltowns1
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Re: The best way to articulate assumption family questions

Postby ltowns1 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:38 pm

RZ5646 wrote:I make it as simple as possible. As I was reading that, I was just like, boom, "Joe can't go to the other side of town."

There are always many possible correct answers for assumption questions like that (example other sufficient assumptions: Joe is dead or otherwise incapable of "going" anywhere, Joe lives in Berlin during the Cold War and the KGB will prevent him from crossing to the other side of town, Joe has an anti-shoe-factory force field around him [note: this reveals the ambiguity in your "there"... do you mean he can't go to "other side of town" or to the "shoe factory"], etc.), but in general you should just think of the simplest possible assumption, since that's the one that is most likely to be TCR (that's just how LSAC writes questions).



That's what I was looking for thanks.




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