Pt 24 section 3 # 15

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ltowns1
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Pt 24 section 3 # 15

Postby ltowns1 » Tue Feb 24, 2015 4:38 pm

I got this right,but I'm curious, would (E) have been correct if you traded "at least one" for the word "some"?Or is that the same thing? I thought you can't combine two some statements which is what I thought (E) did??

Jon McCarty
Posts: 87
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2014 12:39 pm

Re: Pt 24 section 3 # 15

Postby Jon McCarty » Wed Feb 25, 2015 12:11 am

ltowns1 wrote:I got this right,but I'm curious, would (E) have been correct if you traded "at least one" for the word "some"?Or is that the same thing? I thought you can't combine two some statements which is what I thought (E) did??


At least one is the definition of some and can be used interchangeably with it, so it would not change this answer choice nor any other statement to swap at least one for some or vice versa.

The prompt on this one actually contains a some (many) and an all statement which can be combined to get a some statement (answer choice E). The all statement is a little hidden though. When they say "such characterizations" it is like saying "all such characterizations." This is how they combine the two statements to reach the some statement in E.

Characterizations <-Some-> Imprecise
Imprecise -----> ~Adequate for criticism
_____________________________________

Inference: Characterizations <-Some-> ~Adequate for criticism (E)


hope this helps!

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ltowns1
Posts: 693
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Re: Pt 24 section 3 # 15

Postby ltowns1 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 12:21 am

Jon McCarty wrote:
ltowns1 wrote:I got this right,but I'm curious, would (E) have been correct if you traded "at least one" for the word "some"?Or is that the same thing? I thought you can't combine two some statements which is what I thought (E) did??


At least one is the definition of some and can be used interchangeably with it, so it would not change this answer choice nor any other statement to swap at least one for some or vice versa.

The prompt on this one actually contains a some (many) and an all statement which can be combined to get a some statement (answer choice E). The all statement is a little hidden though. When they say "such characterizations" it is like saying "all such characterizations." This is how they combine the two statements to reach the some statement in E.

Characterizations <-Some-> Imprecise
Imprecise -----> ~Adequate for criticism



_____________________________________

Inference: Characterizations <-Some-> ~Adequate for criticism (E)


hope this helps!


Those LSAT bastards lol, how am i supposed to know that!!! Lol thanks so much.

Jon McCarty
Posts: 87
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2014 12:39 pm

Re: Pt 24 section 3 # 15

Postby Jon McCarty » Wed Feb 25, 2015 12:00 pm

ltowns1 wrote:Those LSAT bastards lol, how am i supposed to know that!!! Lol thanks so much.


It's a tricky structure, but for the most part if a statement starts with a noun (characterizations in this case) you can read it as an all statement. There are a few exceptions, like if they qualify it later in the statement with something like "sometimes" or use some funky sentence structures but for your run of the mill statements this will work.

Examples:

(All) People who like pizza like soda.
(All) Dogs that have long hair shed fur.
(All) Characterizations of my work are wrong.

Throwing in the word "such" at the beginning of this statement makes it even more hidden, but I hope this helps!

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ltowns1
Posts: 693
Joined: Mon May 26, 2014 1:13 am

Re: Pt 24 section 3 # 15

Postby ltowns1 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:24 pm

Jon McCarty wrote:
ltowns1 wrote:Those LSAT bastards lol, how am i supposed to know that!!! Lol thanks so much.


It's a tricky structure, but for the most part if a statement starts with a noun (characterizations in this case) you can read it as an all statement. There are a few exceptions, like if they qualify it later in the statement with something like "sometimes" or use some funky sentence structures but for your run of the mill statements this will work.

Examples:

(All) People who like pizza like soda.
(All) Dogs that have long hair shed fur.
(All) Characterizations of my work are wrong.

Throwing in the word "such" at the beginning of this statement makes it even more hidden, but I hope this helps!



Thanks that helps a lot




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