Four Months to 173

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nothingtosee
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby nothingtosee » Tue Feb 17, 2015 1:40 pm

This thread can't be real. Nonetheless, I can't look away.

ongtexas
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby ongtexas » Tue Feb 17, 2015 1:43 pm

Pneumonia wrote:Diagnostic 151, test day 175+. My highest PT of all time was the 5th one I took (of 30); shit is unpredictable, but you can get there.


Seconding this. 154 diagnostic, 175 on test day, best PT was a 171. I'm not suggesting anyone expect this kind of outcome, but big jumps are possible.

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RZ5646
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby RZ5646 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:15 pm

Those of you who made large improvements on RC were probably making some huge, easily fixable mistakes in the beginning and then quickly learned how to do RC sections better, not how to read better. Other people are simply bad at reading and will not see major improvements no matter how many sections they do.

msp8
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby msp8 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:18 pm

RZ5646 wrote:Those of you who made large improvements on RC were probably making some huge, easily fixable mistakes in the beginning and then quickly learned how to do RC sections better, not how to read better. Other people are simply bad at reading and will not see major improvements no matter how many sections they do.


Nope. It actually took me awhile to make the improvements. I think you're just wrong. ;)

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schmelling
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Postby schmelling » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:22 pm

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foamborn
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby foamborn » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:31 pm

ilikebaseball wrote:This thread seems pretty obnoxious to me. I'm sorry. Wow though.

"Come join me on my journey so YOU can see what its like for ME to possibly maybe with a slight chance get a 173"

You're gonna get a 173 in 4 months? Where are you at right now? And you're gonna build your LSAT endurance by exercising? In 4 months you're gonna score in the 99th percentile? Okay


wutever u may think of the style of the OP's post i don't think OP's goal is obnoxious. their point is that threads talking about scoring high are lacking an important component: the psychology of the studier as they're going thru the process. yeah, maybe it's so different person to person that the thread won't amount to much, but still...the idea isn't so bad. also, if it happens to help the OP score better to post, then great.

also, i think exercising helps a lot with lsat endurance. it just gives u better concentration, makes u feel better, etc.

if u're trolling, i don't really see the point. for some people getting a 173 is a task.

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RZ5646
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby RZ5646 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:32 pm

schmelling wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:Those of you who made large improvements on RC were probably making some huge, easily fixable mistakes in the beginning and then quickly learned how to do RC sections better, not how to read better. Other people are simply bad at reading and will not see major improvements no matter how many sections they do.


What are you talking about? I am an LSAT tutor. I have helped people pick up in this section. A high school student can read well enough for this test. Its about learning to pick up on what is important, and expediting your process for selecting the right answer. That can be done by anyone who puts in the effort.


Why are you hanging out in the June LSAT study group if you're an LSAT tutor?

Also, adding that you're a tutor and thus have a vested interest in making people believe that they can improve if they have enough time (and money) doesn't really improve your credibility.

It's great that you guys improved, but there are many years worth of equally valid anecdotal evidence here on TLS saying that RC is by far the hardest to improve, so I stand by my statement.

msp8
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby msp8 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:34 pm

RZ5646 wrote:It's great that you guys improved, but there are many years worth of equally valid anecdotal evidence here on TLS saying that RC is by far the hardest to improve, so I stand by my statement.


Weren't you the one going on a tangent a few weeks ago about regurgitating things you've read on TLS?

ilikebaseball
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby ilikebaseball » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:36 pm

foamborn wrote:
ilikebaseball wrote:This thread seems pretty obnoxious to me. I'm sorry. Wow though.

"Come join me on my journey so YOU can see what its like for ME to possibly maybe with a slight chance get a 173"

You're gonna get a 173 in 4 months? Where are you at right now? And you're gonna build your LSAT endurance by exercising? In 4 months you're gonna score in the 99th percentile? Okay


wutever u may think of the style of the OP's post i don't think OP's goal is obnoxious. their point is that threads talking about scoring high are lacking an important component: the psychology of the studier as they're going thru the process. yeah, maybe it's so different person to person that the thread won't amount to much, but still...the idea isn't so bad. also, if it happens to help the OP score better to post, then great.

also, i think exercising helps a lot with lsat endurance. it just gives u better concentration, makes u feel better, etc.

if u're trolling, i don't really see the point. for some people getting a 173 is a task.


Uhh then post in the June LSAT thread. Not hard.

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nlee10
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby nlee10 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:37 pm

msp8 wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:It's great that you guys improved, but there are many years worth of equally valid anecdotal evidence here on TLS saying that RC is by far the hardest to improve, so I stand by my statement.


Weren't you the one going on a tangent a few weeks ago about regurgitating things you've read on TLS?

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foamborn
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby foamborn » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:44 pm

ilikebaseball wrote:
Uhh then post in the June LSAT thread. Not hard.


except that OP's point is to have a thread accessible after the fact for people who want to see the day to day concerns of a studier who makes it to a certain score threshold. it might be the case that browsing thru the june study threads is useful for someone in the same way that the OP is intending, but there's so much nonsense in those threads that i think OP's decision is reasonable. unfortunately, this thread may be suffering the same fate as those study threads.

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RZ5646
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby RZ5646 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 2:51 pm

msp8 wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:It's great that you guys improved, but there are many years worth of equally valid anecdotal evidence here on TLS saying that RC is by far the hardest to improve, so I stand by my statement.


Weren't you the one going on a tangent a few weeks ago about regurgitating things you've read on TLS?


I was, but there are several relevant distinctions that make this case different. First I'll say, if there is a consensus on something, I think we should acknowledge it... hundreds of people all saying the same thing must mean something. Sometimes—for example, when 0Ls are regurgitating third-hand claims about law school and legal employment—that consensus can be explained away and largely ignored. However, when people are discussing something they have direct experience with, like LSAT prep, we should probably take them more seriously. Furthermore, RC does seem much less gameable than the other sections, so the conventional wisdom is not in conflict with common sense. In short then, in this case, the conventional wisdom is both plausible and widely supported by people who have the experience to judge its validity, so I will accept it.

I'll admit that your anecdotal evidence is just as valid as everyone else's, but since you're in the minority I see no reason why we should elevate your opinion over the existing consensus and conventional wisdom.

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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby PeanutsNJam » Thu Feb 19, 2015 10:09 am

schmelling wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:
Why are you hanging out in the June LSAT study group if you're an LSAT tutor?


to keep up with what is and is not helping people improve, and continue to gain insight into the LSAT prep process. shitpoast

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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby RZ5646 » Thu Feb 19, 2015 10:24 am

PeanutsNJam wrote:
schmelling wrote:
RZ5646 wrote:
Why are you hanging out in the June LSAT study group if you're an LSAT tutor?


to keep up with what is and is not helping people improve, and continue to gain insight into the LSAT prep process. shitpoast

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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby PeanutsNJam » Thu Feb 19, 2015 7:58 pm

There is no shame in shitpoasting RZ

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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby JustShowingUp » Sun Feb 22, 2015 12:47 am

Week 3: The First Setback

Day 1

I took most of the day off from studying. This gave me a chance to catch up on my (almost nonexistent) social life.

Finished the Logic Reasoning Bible (LRB) chapter 7. Very informative chapter. The 5th question of the last question set was really hard. I fell for the “most attractive wrong answer” because it sounded so similar to the answer I wanted to see. I was also thrown off by the constant mention of “time” in the stimulus and assumed it was important to the question. Need to review this question in the future.

Day 2

Finished chapter 8. Causal reasoning is relatively intuitive. The correct answer to weakening questions almost always fall into the following categories:

    1. Alternative cause for effect

    2. When cause, no effect

    3. When effect, no cause

    4. Cause/effect relationship is reversed

    5. Data error

May need to review advanced causal reasoning in the future.

Day 3

Finished chapter 9. Strengthen questions seem pretty straight forward. Just focus on the conclusion and find the one answer that helps it.

Chapter 10 has great advice on a mechanical approach to justify questions. Using this strategy makes justify questions almost too simple. The chapter does mention that LSAC is adapting to this strategy but justify questions require such extreme answers that this question type shouldn’t pose too much trouble no matter what LSAC does.

Justify answers must rule out any weaknesses that can hurt the conclusion. It’s very easy to prephrase the missing conditional element.

Chapter 11’s section on the differences between supporter and defender assumptions is interesting. The supporter fills the logical gap, the defender says everything that weakens the conclusion is false. A correct answer can be a statement that says an alternative is impossible. This makes it difficult to prephrase the answer. Approach with an open mind.

Getting through the last half of chapter 11 took longer than the other two and a half chapters combined. My pacing slowed to a crawl, I had to reread everything over and over again because nothing was registering. My head felt “full”. In retrospect, I should have stopped halfway into chapter 11 because I pushed myself well into burnout territory when I tried finishing the rest. If I continue being this undisciplined, I will likely burn out.

Reaching the burnout point and then pushing just a little bit further is the way to develop endurance. But going too far past the burn out point is going to be counter productive. This preparation process is a marathon, not a sprint.

Finished chapter 11. Interesting that LSAC studies the mechanical strategies taught in prep materials and adapts to them. It’s clear that fluidity is crucial at the nosebleed level of performance. Can’t be too stiff and mechanical.

I took an involuntary cold shower when I got home because the hot water wasn’t running. This was just what I needed to work off some stress from my burnout study session. I used to take cold showers a few times a week for motivation but I haven’t needed one for the LSAT yet. This is a good opportunity for me to explain three great reasons for taking cold showers:

    1. To get used to discomfort. Growing as a person means stepping outside of your comfort zone. If you are lucky enough to be studying for the LSAT, you probably aren’t starving for food or cowering for safety. In other words, what’s keeping you from your potential isn’t some uncontrollable and dire outside circumstance. What’s keeping you from your potential is you. You are holding back because you’ve fallen into a comfort zone. You may be considered a hard worker relative to your peers, but you are still in your own comfort zone relative to your potential. The longer you stay there, the harder it will be to get out because you are continuously reinforcing this mental boundary. Taking a cold shower may seem like a strange remedy, but every time you take a cold shower, you are building the habit of voluntarily participating in discomfort. The stronger this habit becomes, the easier it will be to step outside of your comfort zone in other areas of your life.

    2. To create a Pavlovian response to doubts and fears. If you’ve never taken a cold shower before, then trust me, it takes a little bit of self-convincing at first. Before you actually enter the shower, you will feel the familiar emotions of doubt and fear. You really don't want to go through with it. But every time you recognize these emotions, take a small step towards the water. Do this until you are fully drenched. Repeat this ritual every day until you’ve developed a Pavlovian response of taking action when you feel doubts or fears. Don’t let doubts and fears paralyze you, let them be impetuses for initiative. Train yourself to respond with determined resolve.

    3. To get an adrenaline rush. When you first step into a cold shower, your entire body tenses up. Your muscles contract, your blood rushes to your vital organs, and your thoughts dissipate. You will likely scream like a little girl. This leaves you with a great hyped up feeling when you finish.

Day 4

Chapter 12 was a very quick read with only a few pages of texts. Resolve the paradox questions are very easy. Just need to read the questions carefully.

Chapter 13 was very dense. Hard to get through the materials because of how abstract everything is. I was constantly zoning out because I felt like I couldn’t retain anything. Get ready for a fight when you get to this chapter because it took me three hours to get through half of it.

Need to review the “Some Train Diagramming Mini Drills”. I stopped reading after the drill and skipped straight to the problem set. I wanted to see if I can solve the problems using intuition and then skip the rest of the chapter and strategies altogether. But holy cow, even after skipping a third of the reading, the core strategies were still immensely helpful. I sped through the questions. If I didn’t learn these strategies, I would have gotten a lot of these problems wrong on a test. But with the proper diagram, these questions became very straight forward.

This chapter alone is worth the price of the book in my opinion. Make sure to spend some time here.

Finished chapter 13!!! It took me over 4 hours but it’s done.

I really want to stop here but my goal is to get this book done by Day 6. Chapter 14 is only 15 pages of reading, not including the review. I will also try to finish this study session off with chapter 22 which is just a light reading section on timing. I’m going to watch a quick motivation video and then get back to studying.

Muscle Prodigy Motivation- Athlete Sports Inspiration
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzF468S1Cqc

Day 5

I couldn’t finish chapter 14 yesterday. I got half way through and had to stop before going too far into burnout territory.

Finished Chapter 14. This book progresses from concrete question types to abstract ones. I think it would be more efficient to spend time on the abstract chapters because 1) the harder questions will tend to be more abstract 2) mastering the abstract question types makes the concrete ones easy.

Took a break to watch:

Be Fearless (greatest motivational ever!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjjYVROiJIA

Finished chapter 15. Need to drill errors of reasoning questions. Being unfamiliar with abstract descriptions of errors costs time and accuracy, this is an easily improvable area. Made two mistakes in the problem set, #6 and #8 need to review.

Finished chapter 16. The section on “elements that must be parallel” is a must learn. It gives a great strategy for attacking this question type. Made a mistake on the question after the abstraction strategy, need to review here. Question 4 of the problem set was very hard, I was deciding between A and B and it turned out the answer was C!

Day 6

Finished chapter 17. This was a relatively straight forward chapter, good way to warm up for a study session. Is there a mistake in question 3 of the problem set? The conclusion states that the standard of living increased but the correct answer allows for a drop in EEC per capita GDP of $1000. If Country A’s gap with EEC increased from $5000 to $6000, and EEC decreased by $1000, then the per capita GDP of Country A remained the same. Therefore, the standard of living remained the same. This contradicts the conclusion. I trust the LSAC more than myself at the moment so I’m sure I made a mistake somewhere, but I can’t figure it out. I selected the “right” answer because it was still far better than the other choices.

Chapters 18, 19, and 20 are all short chapters with fewer than 10 pages of reading each. Should be easy and fast chapters to work through.

Finished chapter 18, variance test seems useful, won’t take long to master.

Finished chapter 19, really easy chapter to get through.

I stopped here and watched Muscle Prodigy’s video on mental toughness for motivation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nB9San2QtBI

Finished chapter 20.

I stopped for another break to watch Muscle Prodigy’s video on how to lead by example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxyehxte7g4

If you haven’t already, check out Muscle Prodigy TV’s channel. He posts daily motivation videos and they’re awesome. I usually spend my breaks browsing his channel and I’m just linking whatever I happen to watch, so these may not be the videos that speak to you the most. I watch a few of his videos every day, he’s very inspirational.

Finished chapter 21! Overall this was a pretty helpful chapter. I’ve gotten confused by principle related questions before and this chapter cleared a lot of that up. The chapter looked longer than the previous three but the 2 questions and explanations took up most of the length so it was a relatively fast read.

Done with the logical reasoning bible! I’m happy to have finished on Day 6 despite the Day 4 hiccup.

I’ve noticed a buildup of stress and fatigue this week. I am beginning to have trouble sleeping and would wake up a few times a night. I’m also seeing a slew of other symptoms of stress but I won’t bore you with the whole list. What’s important is to manage the stress and sustain the current pace of studies. Here’s a list of methods I’ve found to be helpful for managing stress:

    1. Exercising
    2. Meditating
    3. Praying
    4. Singing
    5. Sleeping/napping
    6. Engaging in social activities
    7. Getting a massage/stretching/foam rolling
    8. Taking deep breathes
    9. Taking cold showers

I’ve already gone over several of these methods in previous updates, I’ll explain the rest of them in coming updates. I’ll also share anything else I remember along the way.

Day 7 – The second timed practice test (PT32)

Woke up early and feel a little tired.

Breakfast: chicken biscuit sandwich and coffee

Tiredness, sickness, distractions, and anything else won’t really matter on the test day if I prepared properly. I’ll never be “100%” so using any of those excuses for underperformance is a waste of time and energy. Excuses in general are wastes of energy unless they’re done out of social etiquette for inconveniencing others.

I expect to do better on this test than the last one. From my experience with standardized tests, I experience a score drop right after the first read through of all the materials because I would spend too much time trying to use strategies I haven’t mastered. I don’t expect a score drop to happen this time because I think I’m already past the “dip” of the J curve. I think I have enough skills to score 170+.

Section 1: Logical Reasoning (-2)

http://i.imgur.com/3LjMbjM.png

I felt pretty good going through this section. I recognized a question or two from the LRB. I’m surprised I got -2 here because I thought I answered everything correctly. I can see myself conquering logical reasoning once I drill some of the strategies I learned during the week.

Section 2: Reading Comprehension (-8)

http://i.imgur.com/nYackRA.png

I thought last week was a fluke, but it clearly was not. I am having serious timing issues here and I once again ran out of time after the 3rd passage. Unlike last week, I didn’t skip any passages this time, so I did all my guessing on the 4th passage instead of the 3rd. I originally guessed D for every question in the last passage but the topic was interesting so I decided to skim the reading and change my answers on any questions I felt like I had a shot at. As you can see, if I had left everything as D, I would have gotten just 3 questions wrong on this passage. With my skimming strategy, I bumped that number up to 6. The lesson here is to just leave answers as guesses to ensure a 20% chance of choosing the correct one for each question. By skimming and choosing answers with incomplete comprehension, I fell for every trap answer there was and guaranteed myself a 0% chance of getting any correct answers.

Despite the score, I’m happy with my performance. I only missed two questions in the three passages I read and I had about 5 minutes left by the time I reached the last one. With another 3 minutes, I would easily be in the -3 to -4 range. Last week, I also answered two questions wrong in the three passages I had time to read. However, by the time I got to the last passage, I didn’t even have time to skim it. So my skill (accuracy) has remained constant but my timing has improved quite a bit. On my next test, I will probably still run out of time, but I should have time to answer at least half of the questions on the last passage I read.

Section 3: Logic Games (-3)

http://i.imgur.com/EcPteFH.png

My stamina is noticeably better. I was exhausted by the time I got to the third section last time but I felt pretty good today. I ran out of time again but I only had to guess on the last 4 questions. Aside from the two mistakes I made by guessing, I only got one other question wrong in the third game. That question was only a two star difficulty question so I’m assuming I made an easily fixable mistake there (haven’t had time to review yet). So although I haven’t had time to practice logic games in over a week and I still don’t feel confident or comfortable with them, LG is still quickly becoming my best section on the test. I mentioned last week that I will be very comfortable with sequencing games by the time I finish preparing. Well, three of the games on this test were sequencing games and the only wrong answer I didn’t guess on was in the non-sequencing game. So it looks like last week’s prediction is coming true. However, if I had gotten 3 grouping questions instead of sequencing ones, my score would be very different.

Section 4: Logical Reasoning (-3)

http://i.imgur.com/5ejwXFx.png

Again, I recognized a few questions from the LRB so my score is slightly inflated. It seems like LSAC removed question 22 here, so I had over 5 minutes left by the time I finished. I think my score here will improve once I drill some of the strategies. I’m already feeling a lot more comfortable with questions that use conditional logic.

Section 5 [Experimental]: Logical Reasoning (-2)

This is the second section of PT31.

Reported Score: 167

I felt positive I scored 170+ when I finished the test so needless to say, I was definitely not expecting to see my score decline from last week’s. Don’t forget that this score is inflated because I recognized a few of the questions from the LRB, so my actual score decline is understated.

Despite the setback, I’m glad this test confirmed my weakness on the RC section. I’m answering the questions very accurately, but I just need be a little faster. The good news is the remedy to this problem is very enjoyable. I just need to find (complex) academic papers in which ever subject I find interesting and practice reading them.

The reason why (complex) academic papers are good to practice with is because they are usually denser and harder to read than LSAT passages. Academic papers are often filled with jargons and complex sentence structures so once you get used to reading those, LSAT passages will read like a children’s book in comparison. The whole point of practice is to challenge yourself so much that the real test feels like a cakewalk. This is why I don’t plan on using a watch for the LSAT. If I prepare correctly, I should be finishing almost every section before the five minute warning. Instead of looking at my watch on the test, I should be looking at the questions. Instead of adjusting my watch during breaks, I should be meditating for a more effective mindset. This is the level of preparedness I hope to be by the test date.

However, I’m still not competent enough to really demonstrate what I mean by this but once I begin scoring -3 or better on every section I will talk more about maximizing the efficiency of study time. Speaking of study time, here’s a quick break down of what I’ll be working with until the test date:

I am planning on taking about 20 days off from studying between now and the test date so that leaves me with about 80 days to study on. Although I can sustain a schedule of studying 8 hours a day, I think I’ll be just as productive with 6 hours. I’d rather spend the other two hours working on activities that will have a “multiplier effect” on my studying efficiency such as exercising, meditating, and napping.

So this means I’ll have just under 500 hours of total study time to work with. That’s about 50 hours for each point I need to increase from my diagnostic to reach 178. Of course score progression is not linear, this is just to help break down the abstractness of the whole process.

With a total of 80 days to study on, I obviously won’t have time to do every single practice test. I won’t even have time to do a quarter of them. I’m going to use the practice tests as a pool of questions to drill with. I’ll also skip all the easy questions because it’s not efficient to spend any time on them unless you’re consistently getting them wrong or you have a full year to study.

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nothingtosee
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby nothingtosee » Sun Feb 22, 2015 7:39 am

IMO if you have 80 days you should take more than 20 PTs.

NonTradLawHopeful
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby NonTradLawHopeful » Sun Feb 22, 2015 11:07 am

Not sure I would call a 167 for your third PT a setback...do you blind review the tests afterwards? If not you are missing out on a critical part of improving.

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Clearly
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby Clearly » Sun Feb 22, 2015 7:29 pm

use a watch on test day. That's dumb.

Blueprint Ben
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby Blueprint Ben » Mon Feb 23, 2015 4:00 pm

JustShowingUp wrote:The whole point of practice is to challenge yourself so much that the real test feels like a cakewalk. This is why I don’t plan on using a watch for the LSAT. If I prepare correctly, I should be finishing almost every section before the five minute warning. Instead of looking at my watch on the test, I should be looking at the questions. Instead of adjusting my watch during breaks, I should be meditating for a more effective mindset. This is the level of preparedness I hope to be by the test date.

First of all, I love this thread. I think this is an amazing idea, despite the flak you've taken from some posters here. It's a great motivational tool for you, and regardless of how your test turns out, it will be a useful resource for newcomers. I wish I had done something like this when I was studying.

But yeah, let's talk about timing:

Not using a watch is a nice thought in theory. I get where you're coming from. The idea is that you should be so automatic with your internal sense of timing that you won't need it. Awesome. You should aspire to reach that level, and with enough practice, I have no doubt that you'll get there. But not using a watch a terrible idea in practice. On game day, your internal sense of timing is the first thing to go. Nerves will cause you to stumble at least a little bit, even if you're the coolest, calmest test taker in the universe. That doesn't mean you can't 180. But you're definitely going to want a watch, just to make sure you're on pace.

Also, the bolded: ABSOLUTELY NOT! You should never practice finishing the sections with a severe time handicap. Seriously, don't do this. Internalizing a 30 minute pace will cause you to sacrifice points on test day. As you get better with timing, your goal should be to finish as close to 35 as possible without going over. Even if you think you can go -0 in 30 minutes every time, you shouldn't. Aim to reallocate all of the time you save on the easy questions to the hard questions. Your remaining time at the end of the section is never as well spent as it would have been if you allotted it to working more slowly on the toughest questions the first time through. If you're finishing in 30 minutes with great accuracy, then you should finish in 34:59 with perfect accuracy. As you get faster, you earn the luxury of slowing down. Slowing down is the thing that makes you better. Don't be a hero. Use the full 35 every time, even if you don't think you need it.

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RZ5646
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby RZ5646 » Mon Feb 23, 2015 7:00 pm

Like the other guy said, use your full 35 minutes. I find that when I try to go super fast I make stupid mistakes, and then my extra 5+ minutes is useless because those stupid mistakes could be anywhere and you can't review the entire section in that time.

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Shakawkaw
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby Shakawkaw » Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:21 am

Re: slowing down: you definitely want to practice internalizing the 35 minute pace because you will certainly find yourself subconsciously speeding up on test day because you will probably be nervous. So, internalizing it in praxis makes it more natural to stick to it on the big day.

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Dog
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Re: Four Months to 173

Postby Dog » Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:27 pm

RZ5646 wrote:Like the other guy said, use your full 35 minutes. I find that when I try to go super fast I make stupid mistakes, and then my extra 5+ minutes is useless because those stupid mistakes could be anywhere and you can't review the entire section in that time.



To each his own. I always finished LR with around 5-10 minutes left and reviewed only my circled, uncertain answers at the end. Got -1 total in LR on the real test, which was not far off from my practice averages.

JFO1833
Posts: 261
Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:06 pm

Re: Four Months to 173

Postby JFO1833 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:54 pm

I would definitely bring a watch to the test, however I think it's a good idea to practice so you don't need it. During the test you could get completely thrown off on time and need to know to get readjusted.

The other use of a watch is to make sure you have all answers in before pencils down. Based on the five minute warning I tried to guesstimate the second that the section would end. Within roughly 20 seconds of that estimated end time I stopped all work because, assuming I was waffling between two answers at the very end, I would not want to be between erasure and bubbling when time was called.




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