Have you ever had your IQ tested?

JC17
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:47 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby JC17 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:23 am

RZ5646 wrote:
AReasonableMan wrote:you do realize your IQ may drastically change feom childhood into adulthood? your brain is still developing, and some people develop quicker or slower than others. a lot of the time a smart kid is just a mature kid.


Idk, it was my understanding that IQ isn't supposed to change much over time. It seems unlikely that I'd go from being just a pretty smart 9-year-old to a genius 17-year-old, but I guess it's possible.

In any case, I don't put much stock in IQ or really any other psychometric test. They're primitive tools in a very soft science.

I feel like OP is watching this thread with a bowl of popcorn because he knew TLS would have a field day with a topic like this.


Haha I did not expect a ton of arguments like this.

Anyways, do you mind telling me your IQ and lsat?

Life2good893
Posts: 133
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2014 8:22 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby Life2good893 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:27 am

Just retook an IQ test and scored 110 or "average." So my IQ dropped 6 pts after all this LSAT studying. LOL, proof there is no reliable indicator.

I'm pretty sure high LSAT does not equal high IQ. But does high IQ equal high LSAT?

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13918
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby rinkrat19 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:30 am

mmelittlechicken wrote:disappointed that we don't have any card carrying MENSA members ITT


That made me go search for this exchange in the Enlightened Politics thread
Gatriel wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
Gatriel wrote:
chup wrote:I know you're all special ed and everything, but if you read carefully you'll notice that all she said was that YOU are a moron. Which happens to be correct. The fact that you disagree with her is irrelevant.
Its why I missed Mensa by five points, but whatever. Total moron. You got me. Guilty. :roll:

Dude, you missed Mensa? I just looked it up and I qualify for Mensa with four different tests and I'm literally a potato next to chup.

I sat down and took some test when I was 14. Told I missed it by 5 points, but I am still "materially ahead of the average test taker." I am sure I could find the sheet of paper if I did some digging.

User avatar
fats provolone
Posts: 7125
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2014 4:44 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby fats provolone » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:36 am

that was actually the moment i started to feel bad for gatriel

User avatar
RZ5646
Posts: 2391
Joined: Fri May 30, 2014 1:31 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby RZ5646 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:39 am

JC17 wrote:
Haha I did not expect a ton of arguments like this.

Anyways, do you mind telling me your IQ and lsat?


My IQ was only 125 (supposedly the same as Richard Feynman's, which is some consolation I guess) on one of the SD 15 tests. Haven't taken the LSAT yet but my diagnostic was 164 and my last couple PTs were in the low-mid 170s. If I can get logic games down I'm confident I'll score in the mid 170s.

I've accepted that I'm bad at math but good with language, so my "intelligence" varies a lot depending on what exactly the test is measuring.

User avatar
fats provolone
Posts: 7125
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2014 4:44 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby fats provolone » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:40 am

according to buzzfeed my IQ is higher than tim tebow's

JC17
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:47 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby JC17 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:47 am

Life2good893 wrote:Just retook an IQ test and scored 110 or "average." So my IQ dropped 6 pts after all this LSAT studying. LOL, proof there is no reliable indicator.

I'm pretty sure high LSAT does not equal high IQ. But does high IQ equal high LSAT?


Have you taken a real LSAT or any practice tests?

JC17
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:47 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby JC17 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:50 am

RZ5646 wrote:
JC17 wrote:
Haha I did not expect a ton of arguments like this.

Anyways, do you mind telling me your IQ and lsat?


My IQ was only 125 (supposedly the same as Richard Feynman's, which is some consolation I guess) on one of the SD 15 tests. Haven't taken the LSAT yet but my diagnostic was 164 and my last couple PTs were in the low-mid 170s. If I can get logic games down I'm confident I'll score in the mid 170s.

I've accepted that I'm bad at math but good with language, so my "intelligence" varies a lot depending on what exactly the test is measuring.


Was it an online IQ test (there are good ones out there)?

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13918
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby rinkrat19 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:50 am

I've never taken a real IQ test but the free online ones seem to give me pretty consistent results in the 145-149 range (I assume we're not giving those a ton of credence). My LSAT was 171. So, within a couple of percentile points of each other.

JC17
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:47 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby JC17 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:51 am

JC17 wrote:
Life2good893 wrote:Just retook an IQ test and scored 110 or "average." So my IQ dropped 6 pts after all this LSAT studying. LOL, proof there is no reliable indicator.

I'm pretty sure high LSAT does not equal high IQ. But does high IQ equal high LSAT?


Have you taken a real LSAT or any practice tests?


Oh wait, you've already answered my bad lol

What IQ test did you use?

JC17
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:47 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby JC17 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:52 am

rinkrat19 wrote:I've never taken a real IQ test but the free online ones seem to give me pretty consistent results in the 145-149 range (I assume we're not giving those a ton of credence). My LSAT was 171. So, within a couple of percentile points of each other.



Have you tried this one?
http://www.iqtest.dk/main.swf

User avatar
RZ5646
Posts: 2391
Joined: Fri May 30, 2014 1:31 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby RZ5646 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:10 am

JC17 wrote:Was it an online IQ test (there are good ones out there)?


No it was a real test administered by a school psychologist.

I doubt that there are any good online IQ tests. They're just clickbait.

Seriously don't worry about IQ. If you want to achieve a high LSAT score—or really anything in life—a high IQ is neither necessary nor sufficient

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13918
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby rinkrat19 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:27 am

JC17 wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:I've never taken a real IQ test but the free online ones seem to give me pretty consistent results in the 145-149 range (I assume we're not giving those a ton of credence). My LSAT was 171. So, within a couple of percentile points of each other.



Have you tried this one?
http://www.iqtest.dk/main.swf

Nope, I'd never done that one. It's considerably harder than any others I've seen. 130. :?

Life2good893
Posts: 133
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2014 8:22 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby Life2good893 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:50 am

JC17 wrote:
JC17 wrote:
Life2good893 wrote:Just retook an IQ test and scored 110 or "average." So my IQ dropped 6 pts after all this LSAT studying. LOL, proof there is no reliable indicator.

I'm pretty sure high LSAT does not equal high IQ. But does high IQ equal high LSAT?


Have you taken a real LSAT or any practice tests?


Oh wait, you've already answered my bad lol

What IQ test did you use?


http://www.iqtest.dk/main.swf I'm not a fan of visual patterns....

User avatar
rinkrat19
Posts: 13918
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:35 am

Postby rinkrat19 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:56 am

Life2good893 wrote:
JC17 wrote:
JC17 wrote:
Life2good893 wrote:Just retook an IQ test and scored 110 or "average." So my IQ dropped 6 pts after all this LSAT studying. LOL, proof there is no reliable indicator.

I'm pretty sure high LSAT does not equal high IQ. But does high IQ equal high LSAT?


Have you taken a real LSAT or any practice tests?


Oh wait, you've already answered my bad lol

What IQ test did you use?


http://www.iqtest.dk/main.swf I'm not a fan of visual patterns....


What kind of questions are on a real IQ test? I have a hard time believing it would be 100% visual patterns.

JC17
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:47 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby JC17 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 4:04 am

Life2good893 wrote:
JC17 wrote:
JC17 wrote:
Life2good893 wrote:Just retook an IQ test and scored 110 or "average." So my IQ dropped 6 pts after all this LSAT studying. LOL, proof there is no reliable indicator.

I'm pretty sure high LSAT does not equal high IQ. But does high IQ equal high LSAT?


Have you taken a real LSAT or any practice tests?


Oh wait, you've already answered my bad lol

What IQ test did you use?


http://www.iqtest.dk/main.swf I'm not a fan of visual patterns....


Which iq test did you take?

User avatar
RZ5646
Posts: 2391
Joined: Fri May 30, 2014 1:31 pm

Re:

Postby RZ5646 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 4:05 am

rinkrat19 wrote:
What kind of questions are on a real IQ test? I have a hard time believing it would be 100% visual patterns.


There are like a dozen different IQ tests. The 100% pattern ones are supposed to be independent of culture and thus non-discriminatory.

I took a look at that link and I'm 100% sure that most people could make large gains on such a test through practice, just like LG.

Actually, 5 seconds of googling produced evidence in support of my hypothesis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2317294

JC17
Posts: 26
Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:47 am

Re: Re:

Postby JC17 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 4:16 am

RZ5646 wrote:
rinkrat19 wrote:
What kind of questions are on a real IQ test? I have a hard time believing it would be 100% visual patterns.


There are like a dozen different IQ tests. The 100% pattern ones are supposed to be independent of culture and thus non-discriminatory.

I took a look at that link and I'm 100% sure that most people could make large gains on such a test through practice, just like LG.

Actually, 5 seconds of googling produced evidence in support of my hypothesis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2317294


Would you try the test I posted?

It's kinda long though lol :p

musedreverie
Posts: 256
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2014 7:01 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby musedreverie » Sun Jan 18, 2015 8:11 am

I jumped 9 points between my first and best LSAT (in 6 months).

Does that mean somehow my IQ has grown by 14 points as according to this within the 6 month span?

I highly doubt IQs and LSATs are in any way correlated

User avatar
Nulli Secundus
Posts: 2625
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 7:19 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby Nulli Secundus » Sun Jan 18, 2015 8:55 am

downbeat14 wrote:
ilikebaseball wrote:Could you not literally guess like every question and get a 130

If you can't get through two RC passages in 35 minutes we're talkin dyslexia, not bad test takers.


Some people are English as a second language too. I have had a number of those, and it's a major challenge for them.


English as a second language is no excuse.

I know from some well documented cases.

ETA: Lulz

mmelittlechicken wrote:disappointed that we don't have any card carrying MENSA members ITT


Image

Life2good893
Posts: 133
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2014 8:22 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby Life2good893 » Sun Jan 18, 2015 2:42 pm

If I were a person whose primary language was not English, I couldn't even imagine taking the LSAT. Think about how many of the answers rests on some tiny differences in the interpretation of one word. There are countless examples. It makes such a difference if English is your primary language and you naturally know what certain words not only denote but also cannote.

There are many foreigners who do well on the LSAT. But that is testament to their remarkable commitment or incredible intelligence, not some universal accessibility that the LSAT has.

AReasonableMan
Posts: 1504
Joined: Sun Sep 21, 2014 9:32 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby AReasonableMan » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:04 pm

mmelittlechicken wrote:
downbeat14 wrote:
mmelittlechicken wrote:Why don't you tell them not to go to law school instead of stealing their money?


Not sure if you understand how money works. They sign up for the course and pay before I even meet them or see their score. My job is to improve their score from where they are starting. I'm very successful at that. Wouldn't exactly call that stealing...

Secondly, the ones that ask me, I tell them that it's not wise to go to law school unless there is a high chance that they will get a job as a lawyer (based on LST), or if they are going for free.

whatever helps u sleep at night

I wanted to bring this back, because this tutor was being unjustifiably attacked. I have tutored and worked with other tutors for a little over 4 years. The attacks against DownBeat 14 stem from two distinct logic patterns:

1.) Attack 1 - DownBeat14 is unethical, because those students starting with a score in the 120s or 130s probably don't belong in law school. By working with a tutor, one 3 things will result: (a) they won't make the 20 point improvement needed to go to law school and thus have wasted their time and money, (b) they will make the improvement and matriculate to a TTTT with a dismal employment outlook, or (c) they will improve 30+ points and go to a great school. (c) is the least likely outcome of the 3 choices so DownBeat14's tutoring is a negative.

less ethical because s/he is a cog on a chain that is likely to ultimate leave many of the clientele in a worse position. Either the clientele are too dumb to get into law school and are wasting their money, or worse they will wind up attending a school with poor job prospects. DownBeat14 contributes to this problem by directly or indirectly accepting money from the students.

2.) Attack 2- Because a majority of their students don't score a 163 or better, DownBeat14 is a bad tutor.

1.) Response to Attack 1 - You are right: it is likelier that anybody starting with a score in the 130s or 140s will be worse off by going to law school. Even pre-2008 most of the lower tiered schools struggled to place most graduates in high paying jobs, and these schools never justified the tuition costs. Your response is that we should put the burden on the people with the first opportunity to posit the truth to these poor souls: the LSAT tutors who "help" students get into these terrible schools.

You are operating under the logic that if an LSAT tutor told a student that law school is unlikely to be a good bet then they will research it for themselves and not go to law school. The tutor/company loses that particular student's business, and it's all done. The reality is not that simple.

Most people get an LSAT tutor with one goal in mind: Improve my LSAT score. They don't care about the tutor's career advice or anything like that. The reality is that many people below a certain baseline score don't view LSAT tutors as knowledgeable on law. They see the LSAT as a stupid gate in the way of their law school dream, and view the LSAT tutor as a higher paid cab driver or maid. They are not seeking their tutor's non-LSAT advice on law school or the legal profession.

The result of this is that prior to developing a level of friendship and trust, providing unsolicited advice pisses people off. From their perspective they came to you seeking help to get a higher LSAT score, and instead of helping them accomplish this have instead told them that their career goal is likely a poor choice. Now you have an angry client who may not have even paid you any money or even utilized your tutoring service in any meaningful capacity.

From a client's perspective an unsatisfactory relationship with a business results from 1 of 2 of the following: (1) they did not get "the benefit of their bargain"/were wronged/got the business' c-game or (2) they were not treated with respect. Even though law school wires us to associate (1) with a legal claim and (2) as fluff, the real world is really all about (2). It's incredible how forgiving people are about (1) as long as they are treated with respect. Anger, threats, poor word of mouth and bad reviews generally stem from (2). I would even go a step further and argue that 99% of bad reviews pertinent to (1) could all be avoided by upping (2). If you look at bad yelp reviews they almost always end discussing a subsequent conversation with the manager, and how the manager failed to provide (2).

I go off on this tangent simply to illustrate the importance of treating a client with respect. When you tell a client to not pursue law, a pursuit they have invested a large amount of their self-concept in, you're treading on deep water. You have to choose your words carefully, and there is a very specific speech you want to give. Otherwise you leave the customer very angry, and this customer will tell their friends and family, and may even post a bad review. You're risking the loss of future business, including future business from people who would do just fine in law.

With that said, because I always wanted to pursue law I didn't care as much about tutoring, and made poor business choices in the interest of ethics. I would constantly and I still do get literally 60% of my phone calls a month before a given LSAT. These people are desperate, and want to improve their score 30 points in a few weeks (from say a 135 to a 165). Just 2 weeks ago, I had a student call from Miami who's student visa ran out after this year, and needed to improve from the 120s or so on the December test. I gave my token, "We can work with you to improve your score as much as possible, but in the interest of full disclosure, you should realize that such a score increase is unlikely in such a short period." The response is generally, "Major Company YYY says they can help me make the 40 point improvement, and I only called you because you were cheaper. You're not capable of having students making a 40 point improvement?"

These calls just end in a loss of business, but even a legitimate act of kindness risks #2. In 2011, I commuted an hour each way to tutor one student. Frankly I could've made more tutoring others locally, but he was a good bro and I wanted to help him. He improved his score about 15 points on the December test, but this still only left him at about a 155. He saw this as a life saver, wanted to buy me a beer, invited me to the cool division-1 athlete parties I never would've gotten invited to in college, etc. Instead I informed him he needs a 165, and I'd be willing to tutor him for less money (basically cost) till he got there. Well, the social communication of this from his perspective was essentially, "I thought you were my friend, and now you're shaking me down." His parents called me (in LSAT tutoring the millenial generation, the parents are always actively involved), and boy were they pissed. Initially, many of his friends were contacting me for tutoring, and we were going to get classrooms going on. This all abruptly ended. From a business standpoint, if the popular kid at a college loves you then you can make $$ for years. Even after law school I would've probably been able to keep it going by just substituting another tutor in my place.

I credit all of this to the following: If a polished and tremendously successful TTT law school dean in a $2,000 suit parrots one speech and some regular joe in his 20s makes a contradictory speech, who is the consumer going to believe? Complicating matters further, the polished dean is also advocating what the consumer wants to hear. It's easier to believe that which tells you your perspective of seeing the world is correct and doesn't have to change.

2.) Response to Attack 2: Top 10% scores are top 10%, because 90% of people fail to achieve them. After doing this for a while, you can get a feel for a student's range in a few minutes. When you speak with a student through the questions you can generally get a feel for how they think. Sometimes, and this happened to me yesterday, a student gets the wrong answer but you can tell from how she reasoned her way to the wrong answer that she's brilliant and much smarter than the tutor but just needs some shaping. These students make a tutor look good because she'll probably start in the 150s and crack a 170 with a little bit of work. Financially, they are also a goldmine because you can advertise them, and ultimately have them a tutor a market you leave.

On the other end of the coin many students approach LSAT tutoring with the logic: I pay $, I get better score. They simply don't work b/w the lessons, and constantly reschedule lessons. LSAT prep is the least important variable in their lives, and takes a backseat to UGPA, greek life, internships, etc. Many of these students don't appreciate how important the LSAT is if they want to pursue a legal career, and going back to my final point in (1) assume the LSAT tutor is biased for $ and self-assurance reasons. It's like hearing a maid say cleanliness is godliness.

It is very hard to generate major score improvements if the student doesn't do what the tutor tells them to. It's like blaming a personal trainer for a client being fat if the client goes to McDonalds every night. The major obstacle I run into and most of the tutors I run into is the following: the best tutors in terms of teaching ability and expertise are young. They have recently taken the LSAT, still have a semblance of yet to be jaded charisma and are pleasant to be around. A person in their mid-30s with a 99th percentile LSAT score working for $30/hour part time will either be (1) socially inept or (2) deeply depressed in financial turmoil. The one exception to this are house-spouses who are generally great to work with, but are harder to find outside the suburbs.

The reason I went off on this tangent is to support the following: people are less likely to follow commands given their peers than an older person. I run into this a lot with 2 of the following: (1) giddy overly upbeat women and (2) alpha men. With the former, I'm just a nerdy guy spending 2 hours with them and interested in how they think. To desperate women, this may be misconstrued as a sign of interest, and you get invited to their social functions, which is horribly awkward. It also means they aren't following my orders because I'm their friend, which benefits nobody as I don't want to be their friend and they aren't benefiting from tutoring. With alpha men, they legitimately react combatively to orders from me or my suggestions on how they should change their thinking. They're nearly impossible to tutor outside of logic games, because when you tell them how to break down another reasoning pattern they see this as an attack on their masculinity. Most aren't even aware they're doing this, but they generally won't do what their tutor assigns.

Moreover, people naturally like doing what makes them feel good. A person who is naturally good at something will keep doing it, because it makes them feel confident. A person who is naturally weak at something won't do it as much, because it makes them feel insecure. We're all wired to crave security so generally try to avoid acknowledging and working on our weaknesses. This applies to LSAT prep. The people who start with higher scores also work harder so there's really a two-fold advantage in having a great starting score.

There are always exceptions. I once tutored a guy who after doing one session at his place, I looked around his walls and noticed they were almost entirely engulfed with post-its of random shit I said. Although most of it was just observations and useless crap I made up on the spot, it was all up there. He obviously had a 20 pt improvement, because he was motivated to the point of insanity. But this was mostly his own doing. He was naturally motivated when he first called me. Relating back to unjustifiable blame/credit, I got a lot of business from the Pakistani community because of him. He was brilliant, but the public school education system failed him. He had some quirks, and just needed someone who could keep him motivated and feel better about himself so he could neurotically master it on his own with slight shaping.

Lastly, personality fits matter more than most think. People on here and in the open market obsess over credentials: I want the 180 over the 170, the Harvard Law grad over the loser wannabe actor, 10 yrs. experience over 2 years. For most people this is largely all useless as most people start with in the 140-150 range. What is most important is having the right connection with their tutor. Some tutors naturally forge connections better than others and experience helps this, but it's really all about the personality quirks of both the student and the tutor.

On this front: You have both great students and lousy students. The latter are a detriment, because with the great students - they are serious, do their work, respectful and pleasant. If it wasn't for the latter, even a company that is much cheaper could further lower the price. The latter are a drain, and cost time and money. The truth is that those starting in the 130s also tend to be the likeliest to constantly reschedule and not complete work. They're also the reason we can't offer free lessons. Many will try to negotiate lower rates with our tutors independently, ask for a payment plan and not pay, and you even have some who try to get free lessons or several free lessons in specific areas from every tutoring company (the small companies tend to talk to each other). Also, with smaller companies many students only come after taking a Testmasters or Kaplan course so you wind up getting people with the 140 after prep, which makes it harder.
Last edited by AReasonableMan on Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
fats provolone
Posts: 7125
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2014 4:44 pm

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby fats provolone » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:04 pm

holy shit

Mal Reynolds
Posts: 12630
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2011 12:16 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby Mal Reynolds » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:10 pm

Very reasonable response.

ilikebaseball
Posts: 4103
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2014 3:04 am

Re: Have you ever had your IQ tested?

Postby ilikebaseball » Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:12 pm

Idk what all of that says but I believe you




Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 4 guests