"Most" in necessary assumption questions -reliable rule?

Prepare for the LSAT or discuss it with others in this forum.
User avatar
dlrkgml

New
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 12:51 am

"Most" in necessary assumption questions -reliable rule?

Postby dlrkgml » Sun Nov 30, 2014 10:10 pm

Hello,

So I know the LSAT doesn't really have 'guaranteed' rules that you can use (other than negation, etc), but has anyone come across a correct LR answer choice for a necessary assumption question that used the word "most"?

I know "most" is used generally for trap answer choices because the negation of 'most' is 'less than half' and there's really nothing too special about crossing/not crossing the 50% mark for a necessary assumption (unless the stimulus is based on this majority/minority issue). I just looked at a necessary assumption LR question in PT70, S1, #13 for instance and correctly eliminated three answers on the basis that they began with "most." Of course I went back to read the content, but still, seeing that word makes me less inclined to believe it is correct for NA questions.

I also realize precedents can be broken, but have there been any (correct with 'most') to anyone's knowledge?

User avatar
dlrkgml

New
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 12:51 am

Re: "Most" in necessary assumption questions -reliable rule?

Postby dlrkgml » Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:53 am

Answered my own question. There is a NA question with 'most' as a correct answer - it works in this case because the stimulus implied the necessity of that qualifier.

If anyone else is curious, take a look at PT70, S4 #6 :)

BP Robert

Bronze
Posts: 196
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 2:50 am

Re: "Most" in necessary assumption questions -reliable rule?

Postby BP Robert » Mon Dec 01, 2014 5:17 pm

Glad you got that all worked out :)

Most could necessarily be true. A relatively trivial example that illustrates how this could be so is below:


60 votes are required to override a filibuster.

The filibuster was overrode.

Thus, necessarily, "most" voted to override the filibuster.



Best luck,

Blueprint LSAT Prep



Return to “LSAT Prep and Discussion Forum�

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: BeeTeeZ and 13 guests