Logic games basic question help

nosleeptillsuccess
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Joined: Mon Jun 04, 2012 5:03 pm

Logic games basic question help

Postby nosleeptillsuccess » Wed Feb 05, 2014 2:58 pm

How do you know when to "master the possibilities" ... how do you know if its a waste of time or not to write them out

NavyOfficer23
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 2:44 pm

Re: Logic games basic question help

Postby NavyOfficer23 » Wed Feb 05, 2014 11:29 pm

nosleeptillsuccess wrote:How do you know when to "master the possibilities" ... how do you know if its a waste of time or not to write them out


If you can master with just 2 or 3 additional inferences, do it. Also, you can use shorthand to help. So if you are doing an ordering problem you might go like this:

1. A or B
2. C
3. A or B
4. D
5. E or F
6. E or F

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Christine (MLSAT)
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Joined: Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:41 pm

Re: Logic games basic question help

Postby Christine (MLSAT) » Thu Feb 06, 2014 3:02 am

nosleeptillsuccess wrote:How do you know when to "master the possibilities" ... how do you know if its a waste of time or not to write them out


I'm not entirely sure about the terminology, but it sounds like what Manhattan calls 'framing' - where you split the diagram into 2 or 3 diagrams that together cover ALL the possible outcomes.

If so, you want to look for divides that have consequences. A divide would be anything that splits into (ideally) two paths: Q can go 1st or 4th, the chunk XYZ can fit in 2-3-4 or 3-4-5, etc. The "consequences" part is important thought - that divide needs to make other things happen in the game. If you have a divide that doesn't impact any other rules, it's not worth drawing them both out. But if you find that Q going in slot 1 forces a bunch of cascading things to fall into place, and Q being in 4 causes a different cascade, that's something you want to draw both ways.

Just be careful! Make sure that your diagrams don't just represent some of the ways the game can play out, but rather together represent every way the game can play out.

All that being said, you'll just have to practice using this on games where you think it might be fruitful. After you've finished, ask yourself whether it helped. Or, if you decide not to use it, resolve the game using it - was it easier that way? Significantly so? Start to notice the hallmarks of games where framing the options really helped - what do those games have in common? Etc.

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PattyCake
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Re: Logic games basic question help

Postby PattyCake » Thu Feb 06, 2014 3:45 pm

nosleeptillsuccess wrote:How do you know when to "master the possibilities" ... how do you know if its a waste of time or not to write them out


If you're talking about limiting options (eg, there are only 2 ways a game can be worked out) then there are a few good ways to spot them. You can see it in blocs that can only fit in certain places, number limitations (which a lot of people miss, for some reason - make sure you're reading the opening paragraph really carefully and taking things like "TWO of 6 bakers are selected" or "A TOTAL OF 7 selected from 5 candlemakers and 4 butchers get on an escalator in single file" into consideration), and duplications of rules.

Also make sure you look for flips (or whatever you call them, that's just what I think of them as). If you have two sets of things, and two rules relating to opposite characteristics, you can find duplicates hidden there. For instance: if you have red hats and blue hats, worn by men and women, you might see two rules that address two different colored hats, but the contrapositives of their rules don't translate to "red, not red," they translate to "red, blue," because "not red" is blue. Any time you have a row/column in your diagram with only two options (male/female, round/square, new/used, etc.) check your rules to make sure you can't simplify your rules - "not female then red" is harder to remember than "males=red."

blackbirdfly
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2012 11:04 pm

Re: Logic games basic question help

Postby blackbirdfly » Thu Feb 06, 2014 4:00 pm

I began to get better at recognizing when to split the game board when I started watching the 7Sage videos FWIW.




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